Crossing the border : a free Black community in Canada /
Sharon A. Roger Hepburn.
imprint
Urbana [Ill.] : University of Illinois Press, c2007.
description
viii, 252 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780252031830 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Urbana [Ill.] : University of Illinois Press, c2007.
isbn
9780252031830 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6224307
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [229]-239) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-05-01:
In 1851, the Convention of Colored Freemen, meeting in Toronto, declared Canada to be "the best place in the world for black people to live." Hepburn (Radford Univ.) gives a succinct view of the first 10 years of one of those "best" places--Buxton, Ontario, or, as it also was known, the Elgin Settlement. The author gives appropriate attention to the Reverend William King, an ex-slave owner himself, who envisioned Buxton and provided leadership for the settlement after it was established. Unlike many whites at the time, King felt that blacks did not need charity. Rather, if they were landowners and if they experienced a Christian education and environment, they would flourish. The history of Buxton proved King was right. Hepburn concludes that while Buxton's economic performance was lackluster, the settlers generally achieved self-sufficiency, prided themselves on their community history, and in most cases were better off than they had previously been, whether in slavery or freedom. Photographs and a solid bibliography contribute to the work. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. P. T. Sherrill emeritus, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Crossing the Border is essential reading for all serious students of African American history."-- Journal of American History
"Crossing the Border is essential reading for all serious students of African American history."--Journal of American History
"Hepburn's book joins the ranks of the very best accounts of how thirty thousand runaway slaves fled Southern U.S. plantations in search of new lives in Canada, and once there, built viable settlements despite overwhelming odds against them. We are immensely grateful for this well-researched and well-written account."-- H-Canada
"Hepburn's book joins the ranks of the very best accounts of how thirty thousand runaway slaves fled Southern U.S. plantations in search of new lives in Canada, and once there, built viable settlements despite overwhelming odds against them. We are immensely grateful for this well-researched and well-written account."--H-Canada
"Neither a fairy tale of living happily ever after nor a litany of disappointments, Crossing the Border tells of real people who changed their lives and made new ones under the North Star." -- David I. Macleod
"Neither a fairy tale of living happily ever after nor a litany of disappointments, Crossing the Border tells of real people who changed their lives and made new ones under the North Star." David I. Macleod, professor of history, Central Michigan University
"Neither a fairy tale of living happily ever after nor a litany of disappointments,Crossing the Bordertells of real people who changed their lives and made new ones under the North Star." --David I. Macleod,professor of history, Central Michigan University
"Neither a fairy tale of living happily ever after nor a litany of disappointments,Crossing the Bordertells of real people who changed their lives and made new ones under the North Star." David I. Macleod, professor of history, Central Michigan University
" Neither a fairy tale of living happily ever after nor a litany of disappointments, "Crossing the Border" tells of real people who changed their lives and made new ones under the North Star." --David I. Macleod, professor of history, Central Michigan University
"Neither a fairy tale of living happily ever after nor a litany of disappointments, "Crossing the Border" tells of real people who changed their lives and made new ones under the North Star." --David I. Macleod, professor of history, Central Michigan University
"The book is a treasure trove of information. . . . Crossing the Border is recommended for students at both the high school and college levels, and the general reading public."-- Multicultural Review
"The book is a treasure trove of information. . . .Crossing the Borderis recommended for students at both the high school and college levels, and the general reading public."--Multicultural Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2008
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Summaries
Long Description
A story of freedom and flourishing in a community of former slaves In 1849, the Reverend William King and fifteen of his former slaves founded the Canadian settlement of Buxton on a 9,000-acre block of land in Ontario set aside for sale to blacks. Although initially opposed by some neighboring whites, their town grew steadily in population and stature with the backing of the Presbyterian Church of Canada and various philanthropics. A developed agricultural community that supported three schools, four churches, a hotel, and a post office, Buxton was home to almost seven hundred residents at its height. The settlement (which still exists today) remained all black until 1860, when its land was opened to purchase by whites. Sharon A. Roger Hepburn's "Crossing ""the Border" tells the story of Buxton's settlers, united in their determination to live free from slavery and legal repression. It is the most comprehensive study to address life in a black community in Canada.
Main Description
A story of freedom and flourishing in a community of former slaves In 1849, the Reverend William King and fifteen of his former slaves founded the Canadian settlement of Buxton on a 9,000-acre block of land in Ontario set aside for sale to blacks. Although initially opposed by some neighboring whites, their town grew steadily in population and stature with the backing of the Presbyterian Church of Canada and various philanthropics. A developed agricultural community that supported three schools, four churches, a hotel, and a post office, Buxton was home to almost seven hundred residents at its height. The settlement (which still exists today) remained all black until 1860, when its land was opened to purchase by whites. Sharon A. Roger Hepburn'sCrossingthe Bordertells the story of Buxton's settlers, united in their determination to live free from slavery and legal repression. It is the most comprehensive study to address life in a black community in Canada.
Main Description
A story of freedom and flourishing in a community of former slaves In 1849, the Reverend William King and fifteen of his former slaves founded the Canadian settlement of Buxton on a 9,000-acre block of land in Ontario set aside for sale to blacks. Although initially opposed by some neighboring whites, their town grew steadily in population and stature with the backing of the Presbyterian Church of Canada and various philanthropics. A developed agricultural community that supported three schools, four churches, a hotel, and a post office, Buxton was home to almost seven hundred residents at its height. The settlement (which still exists today) remained all black until 1860, when its land was opened to purchase by whites. Sharon A. Roger Hepburn's Crossing the Border tells the story of Buxton's settlers, united in their determination to live free from slavery and legal repression. It is the most comprehensive study to address life in a black community in Canada.
Main Description
A story of freedom and flourishing in a community of former slavesIn 1849, the Reverend William King and fifteen of his former slaves founded the Canadian settlement of Buxton on a 9,000-acre block of land in Ontario set aside for sale to blacks. Although initially opposed by some neighboring whites, their town grew steadily in population and stature with the backing of the Presbyterian Church of Canada and various philanthropics. A developed agricultural community that supported three schools, four churches, a hotel, and a post office, Buxton was home to almost seven hundred residents at its height. The settlement (which still exists today) remained all black until 1860, when its land was opened to purchase by whites. Sharon A. Roger Hepburn'sCrossingthe Bordertells the story of Buxton's settlers, united in their determination to live free from slavery and legal repression. It is the most comprehensive study to address life in a black community in Canada.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Canada: Canaan or "a Freezing Sort of Hell"p. 9
The Reverend William Kingp. 27
An Idea Becomes Realityp. 41
A Settlement Takes Shapep. 59
A Community Arisesp. 77
Family and Community Structurep. 97
Making a Livingp. 116
A Spiritual Peoplep. 138
In Pursuit of an Educationp. 155
A Community Transformedp. 177
Notesp. 203
Bibliographyp. 229
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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