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The making of the British Isles : the state of Britain and Ireland, 1450-1660 /
Steven G. Ellis with Christopher Maginn.
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson/Longman, 2007.
description
xx, 411 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0582040035 (pbk.), 9780582040038 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson/Longman, 2007.
isbn
0582040035 (pbk.)
9780582040038 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6218600
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [379]-400) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Christopher Maginn is Assistant Professor at Fordham University New York.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The Making of theBritish Isles The State ofBritainandIreland1450-1660 Steven G. Ellis, with Christopher Maginn The history of the British Isles is the story of four peoples linked together by a process of state building that was as much about far-sighted planning and vision as coincidence, accident and failure. It is a history of revolts and reversal, familial bonds and enmity, the study of which does much to explain the underlying tension between the nations of modern day Britain. The Making of the British Islesrecounts the development of the nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland from the time of the Anglo-French dual monarchy under Henry VI through the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation crisis, the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the Anglo-Scottish dynastic union, the British multiple monarchy and the Cromwellian Republic, ending with the acts of British Union and the Restoration of the Monarchy. Professor Ellis offers a unique insight into this formative period in Britain's history: not the national histories of four distinct nations but the story of the population of an Archipelago whose political identity was never pre-determined. Professor Steven G. Ellisis Head of the History Department in NUI Galway. His best-known studies areIreland in the Age of the Tudors(1998) andTudor Frontiers and Noble Power: the making of the British state(1995). Dr Christopher Maginnis Assistant Professor of History at Fordham University, Nnew York. He has recently authored'Civilising' Gaelic Leinster: The Extension of Tudor Rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole Lordships(2004). Dr Christopher Maginnis Assistant Professor at Fordham University New York. He has recently authored ‘Civilizing' Gaelic Leinster: the extension of Tudor rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole lordships (Four Courts Press, 2004).
Back Cover Copy
The Making of the British Isles The State of Britain and Ireland 1450-1660 Steven G. Ellis, with Christopher Maginn The history of the British Isles is the story of four peoples linked together by a process of state building that was as much about far-sighted planning and vision as coincidence, accident and failure. It is a history of revolts and reversal, familial bonds and enmity, the study of which does much to explain the underlying tension between the nations of modern day Britain. The Making of the British Isles recounts the development of the nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland from the time of the Anglo-French dual monarchy under Henry VI through the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation crisis, the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the Anglo-Scottish dynastic union, the British multiple monarchy and the Cromwellian Republic, ending with the acts of British Union and the Restoration of the Monarchy. Professor Ellis offers a unique insight into this formative period in Britain's history: not the national histories of four distinct nations but the story of the population of an Archipelago whose political identity was never pre-determined. Professor Steven G. Ellis is Head of the History Department in NUI Galway. His best-known studies are Ireland in the Age of the Tudors (1998) and Tudor Frontiers and Noble Power: the making of the British state (1995). Dr Christopher Maginn is Assistant Professor of History at Fordham University, Nnew York. He has recently authored 'Civilising' Gaelic Leinster: The Extension of Tudor Rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole Lordships (2004). Dr Christopher Maginn is Assistant Professor at Fordham University New York. He has recently authored ‘Civilizing' Gaelic Leinster: the extension of Tudor rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole lordships (Four Courts Press, 2004).
Back Cover Copy
The Making of theBritish IslesThe State ofBritainandIreland1450-1660Steven G. Ellis, with Christopher Maginn The history of the British Isles is the story of four peoples linked together by a process of state building that was as much about far-sighted planning and vision as coincidence, accident and failure. It is a history of revolts and reversal, familial bonds and enmity, the study of which does much to explain the underlying tension between the nations of modern day Britain. The Making of the British Islesrecounts the development of the nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland from the time of the Anglo-French dual monarchy under Henry VI through the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation crisis, the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the Anglo-Scottish dynastic union, the British multiple monarchy and the Cromwellian Republic, ending with the acts of British Union and the Restoration of the Monarchy. Professor Ellis offers a unique insight into this formative period in Britain's history: not the national histories of four distinct nations but the story of the population of an Archipelago whose political identity was never pre-determined. Professor Steven G. Ellisis Head of the History Department in NUI Galway. His best-known studies areIreland in the Age of the Tudors(1998) andTudor Frontiers and Noble Power: the making of the British state(1995). Dr Christopher Maginnis Assistant Professor of History at Fordham University, Nnew York. He has recently authored'Civilising' Gaelic Leinster: The Extension of Tudor Rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole Lordships(2004). Dr Christopher Maginnis Assistant Professor at Fordham University New York. He has recently authored ‘Civilizing' Gaelic Leinster: the extension of Tudor rule in the O'Byrne and O'Toole lordships (Four Courts Press, 2004).
Bowker Data Service Summary
Steven Ellis provides a history of the British Isles from 1450-1660, a period which ended with the acts of British Union and the restoration of the monarchy.
Long Description
The history of the British Isles is the story of four peoples linked together by a process of state building that was as much about far-sighted planning and vision as coincidence, accident and failure. It is a history of revolts and reversal, familial bonds and enmity, the study of which does much to explain the underlying tension between the nations of modern day Britain. The Making of the British Islesrecounts the development of the nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland from the time of the Anglo-French dual monarchy under Henry VI through the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation crisis, the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the Anglo-Scottish dynastic union, the British multiple monarchy and the Cromwellian Republic, ending with the acts of British Union and the Restoration of the Monarchy.
Main Description
The history of the British Isles is the story of four peoples linked together by a process of state building that was as much about far-sighted planning and vision as coincidence, accident and failure. It is a history of revolts and reversal, familial bonds and enmity, the study of which does much to explain the underlying tension between the nations of modern day Britain. The Making of the British Isles recounts the development of the nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland from the time of the Anglo-French dual monarchy under Henry VI through the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation crisis, the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the Anglo-Scottish dynastic union, the British multiple monarchy and the Cromwellian Republic, ending with the acts of British Union and the Restoration of the Monarchy.
Main Description
This complete overview of the interaction between England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales shows how each country's sense of national identity was shaped by the politics of state formation. Gives equal significance to all regions within Britain instead of the traditional focus on England Features a controversial argument that national identities in Scotland, Ireland and Wales arose because England wasn't focused enough on integrating them into ‘Britain' in this period Will be used as a core text on courses about Early Modern Britain
Main Description
This complete overview of the interaction between England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales shows how each country's sense of national identity was shaped by the politics of state formation. Gives equal significance to all regions within Britain instead of the traditional focus on EnglandFeatures a controversial argument that national identities in Scotland, Ireland and Wales arose because England wasn't focused enough on integrating them into ‘Britain' in this periodWill be used as a core text on courses about Early Modern Britain
Table of Contents
Series editor's preface (2001)p. viii
Prefacep. xii
Introduction: the making of British historyp. xv
Acknowledgementsp. xxi
The Royal Houses of England, Scotland and Great Britainp. xxii
Mapsp. xxv
Geography, society and government: the structures of powerp. 1
State formation: unions and conquestsp. 1
Geography, power and societyp. 7
Frontiers and defencep. 12
Military forces and the border surnamesp. 17
Nation, culture and identityp. 23
Politics, war and diplomacy, 1450-1502p. 27
English defeat, Scottish monarchy and Gaelic revivalp. 28
Centre and periphery in the Wars of the Rosesp. 39
The Scottish monarchy and Anglo-Scottish relationsp. 50
The revival of crown governmentp. 55
Restoring royal financesp. 59
English provincial administrationp. 66
The rule of the English marchesp. 70
Royal government in Scotland: an alternative approachp. 79
Machines built for the battlefield: Renaissance monarchy, 1502-60p. 83
War, taxation and the rise of Wolseyp. 85
Tudor reform, rebellion and the royal divorcep. 94
Anglo-Scottish relations and the renewal of warp. 107
'The monstrous regiment of women'p. 115
The Reformation crisis: the origins of a Protestant statep. 121
The Henrician Reformationp. 123
Reform and reaction: the Tudor church militantp. 129
The Elizabethan settlementp. 134
Scotland: an alternative pattern of reformp. 139
The Reformation crisis: reform in the parishesp. 148
'The polities of the best reformed kirks': Scotlandp. 148
Change and continuity in the Tudor churchp. 156
Enforcing the Elizabethan settlement: the opening phasep. 161
Poverty and the Word in the pastoral uplandsp. 166
Tarrying for the magistratep. 170
The Catholic threatp. 175
The Puritan threatp. 177
State intervention and the problems of societyp. 183
Population trends and 'the just price'p. 183
Riot and rebellionp. 191
Regulating the economyp. 197
The poor lawp. 205
Inhibiting vagrancyp. 210
The emergence of a British state system, 1560-84p. 215
Centre and periphery under Elizabethp. 217
Elizabethan financep. 222
Royal marriages, the Tudor succession and Scottish civil warp. 225
Mary, the Norfolk marriage scheme, and rebellionp. 233
Anglo-Scottish relations, frontier defence and Catholic intriguesp. 241
The testing-time of the Protestant state system, 1584-1603p. 254
England's long war with Spainp. 255
The reassertion of royal authority in Scotlandp. 265
The struggle for Britain and Ireland's Gaelic districtp. 271
The last years of the last Tudorp. 285
British multiple monarchy, 1603-37p. 289
James VI and I's perfect unionp. 290
King James and his Gaelic subjectsp. 295
Religious 'congruity' and fiscal crisisp. 298
Faction, favourites and the drift towards warp. 302
Finance and religion: Charles I's war and his English kingdomp. 306
Charles I's interventions in Ireland and Scotland: a pattern establishedp. 315
English constitutional oppositionp. 323
Authoritarian rule in three kingdomsp. 326
The destruction and restoration of multiple monarchy, 1637-60p. 333
Challenge to authoritarian rule: the Scottish National Covenantp. 335
The wars of the Stuart kingdomsp. 339
Commonwealth vs. multiple monarchyp. 358
Cromwell's Commonwealthp. 362
The collapse of republican governmentp. 369
Conclusionp. 372
Bibliographyp. 379
Indexp. 401
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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