Catalogue


The cultural work of empire : the Seven Years' War and the imagining of the Shandean state /
Carol Watts.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2007.
description
ix, 335 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780802097910 (bound) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2007.
isbn
9780802097910 (bound) :
catalogue key
6217880
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Galbraith, Doris. 2008/01/29.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 308-328) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-09-01:
Combining astute literary criticism with a strong, even neo-Marxist, sense of history, Watts (English and humanities, Birkbeck College, Univ. of London) argues that the Seven Years' War (1756-63) marked a crucial moment in the cultural evolution of the British Empire. "Globalization" brought on by imperial warfare and world commerce challenged the moral and social certainties of the Enlightenment, eventuating in "proto-Romanticism." The works of Laurence Sterne, particularly Tristram Shandy and A Sentimental Journey, provide the core of the study, allowing comparisons with contemporary writers such as Voltaire, Wollstonecraft, Adam Smith, Phillis Wheatley, Edmund Burke, and Samuel Johnson. In effect, the book evokes "imperial recoil," a cultural vertigo of clashing conceptions of gender, family, social justice, friendship, nationality, and even time itself. A careful chapter organization--starting from the center, "Lunacy in the Cosmopolis," to the periphery in India, and concluding with an exploration of "Shandean lines"--leads readers through the whirlwind. This work is another account of the birth of British modernity, but it is much better than most because of its poignancy, cultural depth, and realism about the 18th century and the human condition. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. P. Gildrie emeritus, Austin Peay State University
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Choice, September 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
In this unique study, Carol Watts argues that the Seven Years' War (1756-1763) produced an intense historical consciousness within British cultural life, an awareness made particularly manifest in the sense of belonging to community, family and nation. Furthermore, she discusses global warfare as prompting a radical re-imagining of the state and the subjectivities of those who inhabit it.The distinctive writing of Laurence Sterne (1713-1768) is used as a conduit through which to examine the transformations of mid-eighteenth century British culture. Watts revisits this tumultuous period wherein the risks of war generated unexpected freedoms and crises in the making of domestic imperial subjects, crises which continued to reverberate in anti-slavery struggles and colonial conflict from America to India. The Cultural Work of Empireconcentrates on the period from the 1750s to the 1770s and looks at the works of Johnson, Burke, Scott, Wheatley, Rousseau, Smith, Wollstonecraft, Sterne and others as evidence of the cultural impact of the Seven Years' War on British life.Incorporating elements of moral philosophy and philanthropy, political tracts, poetry and grammar exercises, and paintings by Kauffman, Hayman, and Wright of Derby, this original study tracks the investments in and resistances to the cultural work of empire.
Description for Reader
In this unique study, Carol Watts argues that the Seven Years? War (1756?1763) produced an intense historical consciousness within British cultural life, an awareness made particularly manifest in the sense of belonging to community, family and nation. Furthermore, she discusses global warfare as prompting a radical re-imagining of the state and the subjectivities of those who inhabit it.The distinctive writing of Laurence Sterne (1713?1768) is used as a conduit through which to examine the transformations of mid-eighteenth century British culture. Watts revisits this tumultuous period wherein the risks of war generated unexpected freedoms and crises in the making of domestic imperial subjects, crises which continued to reverberate in anti-slavery struggles and colonial conflict from America to India. The Cultural Work of Empire concentrates on the period from the 1750s to the 1770s and looks at the works of Johnson, Burke, Scott, Wheatley, Rousseau, Smith, Wollstonecraft, Sterne and others as evidence of the cultural impact of the Seven Years? War on British life.Incorporating elements of moral philosophy and philanthropy, political tracts, poetry and grammar exercises, and paintings by Kauffman, Hayman, and Wright of Derby, this original study tracks the investments in and resistances to the cultural work of empire.
Back Cover Copy
‘This brilliant book is about the cultural history of the Seven Years War – the first global war. It describes how subjectivity was made and remade by the transforming power of globalisation, as it impinged on gender, the family, citizenship, sovereignty, work, agency, and belonging. The reach and range of its arguments are amazing.’ -John Barrell, Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, University of York
Description for Reader
In this unique study, Carol Watts argues that the Seven YearsA? War (1756A?1763) produced an intense historical consciousness within British cultural life, an awareness made particularly manifest in the sense of belonging to community, family and nation. Furthermore, she discusses global warfare as prompting a radical re-imagining of the state and the subjectivities of those who inhabit it.The distinctive writing of Laurence Sterne (1713A?1768) is used as a conduit through which to examine the transformations of mid-eighteenth century British culture. Watts revisits this tumultuous period wherein the risks of war generated unexpected freedoms and crises in the making of domestic imperial subjects, crises which continued to reverberate in anti-slavery struggles and colonial conflict from America to India. The Cultural Work of Empireconcentrates on the period from the 1750s to the 1770s and looks at the works of Johnson, Burke, Scott, Wheatley, Rousseau, Smith, Wollstonecraft, Sterne and others as evidence of the cultural impact of the Seven YearsA? War on British life.Incorporating elements of moral philosophy and philanthropy, political tracts, poetry and grammar exercises, and paintings by Kauffman, Hayman, and Wright of Derby, this original study tracks the investments in and resistances to the cultural work of empire.
Back Cover Copy
'This brilliant book is about the cultural history of the Seven Years War - the first global war. It describes how subjectivity was made and remade by the transforming power of globalisation, as it impinged on gender, the family, citizenship, sovereignty, work, agency, and belonging. The reach and range of its arguments are amazing.' -John Barrell, Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, University of York
Main Description
In this unique study, Carol Watts argues that the Seven Years' War (1756-1763) produced an intense historical consciousness within British cultural life, an awareness made particularly manifest in the sense of belonging to community, family and nation. Furthermore, she discusses global warfare as prompting a radical re-imagining of the state and the subjectivities of those who inhabit it. The distinctive writing of Laurence Sterne (1713-1768) is used as a conduit through which to examine the transformations of mid-eighteenth century British culture. Watts revisits this tumultuous period wherein the risks of war generated unexpected freedoms and crises in the making of domestic imperial subjects, crises which continued to reverberate in anti-slavery struggles and colonial conflict from America to India. The Cultural Work of Empire concentrates on the period from the 1750s to the 1770s and looks at the works of Johnson, Burke, Scott, Wheatley, Rousseau, Smith, Wollstonecraft, Sterne and others as evidence of the cultural impact of the Seven Years' War on British life. Incorporating elements of moral philosophy and philanthropy, political tracts, poetry and grammar exercises, and paintings by Kauffman, Hayman, and Wright of Derby, this original study tracks the investments in and resistances to the cultural work of empire. >North American Rights Only. Co-published iwth University of Edinburgh Press.
Table of Contents
Introduction : the cultural work of empirep. 1
Lunacy in the cosmopolis (1759) : expansion and imperial recoilp. 28
Patriot games : military masculinity and the recompense of virtuep. 65
Pricksongs in Gotham : or, the sexual oeconomy of state imaginingp. 109
Friendship, slavery and the politics of pity, including a visit from Phillis Wheatleyp. 150
Women's time and work-discipline : or, the secret history of 'poor Maria'p. 197
'Bramin, Bramine' : Sterne, Eliza Draper and the passage to Indiap. 247
Concluding along Shandean linesp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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