Catalogue


Women and minorities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics : upping the numbers /
edited by Ronald J. Burke, Mary C. Mattis.
imprint
Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar, c2007.
description
xvii, 379 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1845428889 (hardcover), 9781845428884 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar, c2007.
isbn
1845428889 (hardcover)
9781845428884 (hardcover)
contents note
Women and minorities in STEM : a primer / Ronald J. Burke -- Keys to success for women in science / Donna J. Dean & Anne Fleckenstein -- The good, the bad and the ugly : women engineering students' experiences of UK higher education / Abigail Powell, Barbara Bagilhole & Andrew Dainty -- Myths and realities in the IT work place : gender differences and similarities in climate perceptions / Debra A. Major, Donald D. Davis, Janice Sanchez-Hucles, Heather J. Downey & Lisa M. Gemano -- Voices of the future : African-American PhD candidates in the sciences / Daryl E. Chubin -- Women in the land of milk, honey and high technology : the Israeli case / Ronit Kark -- An empirical test of the glass ceiling effect for Asian Americans in science and engineering / Tina T. Chen & James L. Farr -- Women in mathematics : examining the hidden barriers that gender stereotypes can impose / Jennifer R. Steele, Leah Reisz, Amanda Williams & Kerry Kawakami -- Attracting the engineers of 2020 today / Susan Staffin Metz -- Developing career commitment in STEM-related fields : myths versus reality / Helen M. Madill, Rachel G. Campbell, Dallas M. Cullen, Margaret-Ann Armour, Albert Einsiedel, Anna-Lisa Ciccocioppo, Jody Sherman, Leonard L. Stewin, Stanley Varnhagen, T. Craig Montgomerie, Cynthia J. Rothwell & Wendy L. Coffin -- Achieving greater diversity through curricular change / Ilene J. Busch-Vishniac & Jeffrey P. Jarosz -- Undergraduate student support programs / Bevlee A. Watford -- The representation and experience of women faculty in STEM fields / Xiangfen Liang & Diana Bilimoria -- Upstream and downstream in the engineering pipeline : what's blocking US women from pursuing engineering careers? / Mary C. Mattis.
catalogue key
6211785
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-03-01:
This collection of 14 essays addresses the major problems that women and minorities in the academic and the professional world face in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and it offers some suggestions for improvement in both the educational and workplace arenas. The first of five sections presents an overview of the issues: the need for more women and minorities in these areas, the challenges faced uniquely by these groups, and action strategies for overcoming the barriers and increasing the numbers. These are discussed at greater length in the remaining four sections. Much of this material is familiar, but there are interesting essays on the actual experience of women, African Americans, and Asian Americans (sometimes lumped together, more often separated out) in both academic institutions and the professional world; methods of changing the academic curriculum to make it friendlier for these groups; and ways to make the professional climate less chilling. Each chapter has a bibliography, and there is an index to the volume as a whole. Both academic institutions and professional groups such as engineering associations could profit from reading this book; it would also be helpful to the aspiring student. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through professionals. M. H. Chaplin Wellesley College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
Editors Ron Burke and Mary Mattis have brought us a truly comprehensive view of women and minorities in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines. Chapter authors are drawn from a range of disciplines and countries, presenting a multi-faceted approach to the issue and offering data not commonly available to the average researchers. Findings from actual programs provide real world experiences to leaven the solid academic research presented by the authors. Anyone wanting a single source to address theory, research, and practical guidelines to increasing participation of women and minorities in STEM should look to this volume. Jong-on Hahm, Center for Women s Leadership at George Washington University, US Rarely do you find such a well-rounded collection of thoughts on the topic of women and minorities in engineering. This book is not only full of invaluable research, it's culturally insightful as well. A must have for those serious about the issue of diversity in engineering. Suzanne Jenniches, Vice President and General Manager, Government Systems Division, Northrop Grumman Corporation; President, Society of Women Engineers, 1988 1989; and Chair of the American Association of Engineering Societies, 2005 Women and Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics is the definitive resource for anyone seeking to understand the numerous factors that impact diversity in STEM professions. Mary Mattis and Ronald Burke have organized the most meaningful statistics, research, and best practices into a comprehensive review of the challenges and opportunities to increase the participation of women in minorities in STEM. By making the complexity and pervasiveness of barriers to women and minorities apparent, Mattis and Burke help us recognize that we must implement solutions that encompass all stages in education, public images of the STEM professions and work place systems in industry and academia. Anyone who sincerely seeks to advance diversity in STEM will find this a priceless resource. Christina M. Vogt, National Academy of Engineering Advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are key factors in contributing to future economic performance, higher living standards and improved quality of life. As dominant white males near retirement and immigration slows, developed countries face a serious skill shortage in critical STEM disciplines. This fascinating book examines why the numbers of women and minorities in STEM are low, outlines the potential consequences of this and prescribes much needed solutions to the problem. The contributors illustrate how women and minorities are subtly and actively discouraged from entering STEM educational programs and occupations, and how once there, face conditions that limit their ability to fully participate should they choose to. Solutions to this complex problem of wasted human talent are prescribed at several levels, beginning with the family and rising up through the educational system to organizational employers and through government-level initiatives. This highly original book will prove a stimulating read for both academics and practitioners interested in gender issues, workforce diversity, management and, of course, in STEM professions.
Main Description
'Editors Ron Burke and Mary Mattis have brought us a truly comprehensive view of women and minorities in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines. Chapter authors are drawn from a range of disciplines and countries, presenting a multi-faceted approach to the issue and offering data not commonly available to the average researchers. Findings from actual programs provide "real world" experiences to leaven the solid academic research presented by the authors. Anyone wanting a single source to address theory, research, and practical guidelines to increasing participation of women and minorities in STEM should look to this volume.' Jong-on Hahm, Center for Women's Leadership at George Washington University, US 'Rarely do you find such a well-rounded collection of thoughts on the topic of women and minorities in engineering. This book is not only full of invaluable research, it's culturally insightful as well. A "must have" for those serious about the issue of diversity in engineering.' Suzanne Jenniches, Vice President and General Manager, Government Systems Division, Northrop Grumman Corporation; President, Society of Women Engineers, 19881989; and Chair of the American Association of Engineering Societies, 2005 'Women and Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics is the definitive resource for anyone seeking to understand the numerous factors that impact diversity in STEM professions. Mary Mattis and Ronald Burke have organized the most meaningful statistics, research, and best practices into a comprehensive review of the challenges and opportunities to increase the participation of women in minorities in STEM. By making the complexity and pervasiveness of barriers to women and minorities apparent, Mattis and Burke help us recognize that we must implement solutions that encompass all stages in education, public images of the STEM professions and work place systems in industry and academia. Anyone who sincerely seeks to advance diversity in STEM will find this a priceless resource.' Christina M. Vogt, National Academy of Engineering Advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are key factors in contributing to future economic performance, higher living standards and improved quality of life. As dominant white males near retirement and immigration slows, developed countries face a serious skill shortage in critical STEM disciplines. This fascinating book examines why the numbers of women and minorities in STEM are low, outlines the potential consequences of this and prescribes much needed solutions to the problem. The contributors illustrate how women and minorities are subtly and actively discouraged from entering STEM educational programs and occupations, and how once there, face conditions that limit their ability to fully participate should they choose to. Solutions to this complex problem of wasted human talent are prescribed at several levels, beginning with the family and rising up through the educational system to organizational employers and through government-level initiatives. This highly original book will prove a stimulating read for both academics and practitioners interested in gender issues, workforce diversity, management and, of course, in STEM professions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Scientific and technological advances and innovations are critical to the economic performance of developed countries and the standard of living of their citizens. The contributors discuss the nature and size of the problem and show why increasing the number of women and minorities in STEM industries is vital.
Table of Contents
Women and minorities in STEM : a primerp. 3
Keys to success for women in sciencep. 28
The good, the bad and the ugly : women engineering students' experiences of UK higher educationp. 47
Myths and realities in the IT workplace : gender differences and similarities in climate perceptionsp. 71
Voices of the future : African-American PhD candidates in the sciencesp. 91
Women in the land of milk, honey and high technology : the Israeli casep. 101
An empirical test of the glass ceiling effect for Asian Americans in science and engineeringp. 128
Women in mathematics : examining the hidden barriers that gender stereotypes can imposep. 159
Attracting the engineers of 2020 todayp. 184
Developing career commitment in STEM-related fields : myth versus realityp. 210
Achieving greater diversity through curricular changep. 245
Undergraduate student support programsp. 276
The representation and experience of women faculty in STEM fieldsp. 317
Upstream and downstream in the engineering pipeline : what's blocking US women from pursuing engineering careers?p. 334
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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