Catalogue


Harlem speaks : a living history of the Harlem Renaissance /
[compiled by] Cary D. Wintz.
imprint
Naperville, Ill. : Sourcebooks, 2007.
description
xxi, 502 p. : ill. + 1 CD.
ISBN
1402204361, 9781402204364
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Naperville, Ill. : Sourcebooks, 2007.
isbn
1402204361
9781402204364
catalogue key
6198860
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [455]-476) and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter
Part 1<br>Harlem and the Harlem Renaissance<br><br>Contemporary Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Over the past four years she has curated five significant exhibitions-"The Quilts of Gee's Bend;" "Something All Our Own: The Grant Hill Collection of African American Art;" "African Art Now: Masterpieces from the Jean Pigozzi Collection;" "Notes from a Childhood Odyssey: The Art of Kermit Oliver;" and "Thornton Dial in the Twenty-first Century and Gee's Bend: The Architecture of the Quilt." She is currently completing a book on African American artist Charles Alston and is continuing her research on African American artists of the southwest, the history of collecting African American art in the United States, and contemporary art in East Africa. <br><br>M. Genevieve West is an Associate Professor of English at Ferris State University, where she teaches African American, Native American, and women's literatures. Her essays and bibliographic work on Zora Neale Hurston have appeared in Women's Studies and Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography. Her study of Hurston's changed reputation, Zora Neale Hurston and American Literary Culture, appeared in 2005. <br><br>Cary D. Wintz is a professor in the History Department of Texas Southern University in Houston. He is the author or editor of numerous books on the Harlem Renaissance and African American history, including Black Culture and the Harlem Renaissance and, with Paul Finkelman, Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance. He is currently working on two projects, the Encyclopedia of African American History, 1896 to the Present, and a historical dictionary of the Harlem Renaissance.<br>
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2007-01-01:
Wintz (history, Texas Southern Univ.; The Harlem Renaissance: A History and an Anthology) has assembled a diverse collection of biocritical essays on artists, writers, and intellectuals whose lives and works greatly influenced African American culture in the three decades following World War I. Those covered include writers (e.g., Langston Hughes), musicians (e.g., James Hubert "Eubie" Blake), artists (e.g., Romare Bearden), stage performers (e.g., Josephine Baker), and civil rights leaders (e.g., Asa Philip Randolph). Contributing scholars, experts in their fields, do an excellent job of tying their respective subject's accomplishments to the overall aims of what became known as the Harlem Renaissance, which remains best known for its contributions in literature. Wintz provides background essays on Harlem, NY, and the movement as well as introductions to each of the book's six sections. One advantage this work has over its competitors is that it includes a CD featuring speeches, poetry, music, never-before-released interviews, and radio broadcasts; another is its price, a real bargain compared with the Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance, also by Wintz, which costs $325. Recommended for public and academic libraries.-William Gargan, Brooklyn Coll. Lib., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2007-07-01:
This admirable project is indeed a "living history." Wintz (Texas Southern Univ.) and his collaborators combed the collections of the Smithsonian Institute and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and found rare sound recordings and photographs of important figures of the Harlem Renaissance, among them Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and Bessie Smith. Examining the politics, literature, music, and visual and performing arts of the "new Negro," the book contains chapters on individual figures of the period. As they move through the text, readers are guided to specific tracks on the CD, where they may hear the artist's own voice. So, for example, the chapter on Marcus Garvey features a 21-page illustrated overview of Garvey's life and career, and the CD includes excerpts from two 1921 speeches supporting the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Readers new to the Harlem Renaissance will find the insightful written texts informative and accessible. More knowledgeable scholars will find little new in the biographies but will be mesmerized by Countee Cullen reading from his poem "Heritage" and Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five singing "I'm Not Rough" in 1927. Summing Up: Essential. All readers; all levels. C. A. Bily Adrian College
Reviews
Review Quotes
This admirable project is indeed a "living history." Wintz (Texas Southern Univ.) and his collaborators combed the collections of the Smithsonian Institute and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and found rare sound recordings and photographs of important figures of the Harlem Renaissance, among them Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and Bessie Smith. Examining the politics, literature, music, and visual and performing arts of the "new Negro," the book contains chapters on individual figures of the period. As they move through the text, readers are guided to specific tracks on the CD, where they may hear the artist's own voice. So, for example, the chapter on Marcus Garvey features a 21-page illustrated overview of Garvey's life and career, and the CD includes excerpts from two 1921 speeches supporting the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Readers new to the Harlem Renaissance will find the insightful written texts informative and accessible. More knowledgeable scholars will find little new in the biographies but will be mesmerized by Countee Cullen reading from his poem "Heritage" and Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five singing "I'm Not Rough" in 1927. Summing Up: Essential. All readers; all levels.
This item was reviewed in:
School Library Journal, November 2006
Library Journal, January 2007
Booklist, February 2007
Choice, July 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
"During the three decades that followed World War I, a stunning outburst of African American culture exploded in America and was eventually labeled the Harlem Renaissance. Essays written by experts in their individual fields examine the life and careers of the writers and poets, critics and political leaders, artists, performers and musicians of that time. Each essay will focus on the relationship of the subject to the Harlem Renaissance and to the development and expression of African American culture. The text is integrated with two full-length CDs featuring music, poetry and literary readings, poems translated into song, interviews, radio broadcasts, discussions and speeches. Among the seminal figures covered are: --Langston Hughes --Zora Neale Hurston --Countee Cullen --Wallace Thurman --Richard Wright --Bessie Smith --Paul Robeson --Louis Armstrong --Josephine Baker --Duke Ellington --W.E.B. Du Bois --Marcus Garvey"
Main Description
Harlem Speaks showcases the lives and works of the artists, writers and intellectuals behind the stunning outburst of African American culture in the three decades after World War I. In the tradition of the New York Times bestseller Poetry Speaks, the book combines each subject's key works with biographical and critical essays by leading Harlem Renaissance authority Cary Wintz and other experts. The integrated audio CDs feature music, poetry and literary readings, interviews, radio broadcasts, discussions and speeches, bringing the Harlem of legend to vibrant life once again. Hear, see and read the best of: Langston Hughes Claude McKay Zora Neale Hurston Richard Wright Duke Ellington Ethel Waters Josephine Baker Marcus Garvey Alain Locke and more The audio also includes never-before-released interviews conducted by Pulitzer Prize-uwinning author David Levering Lewis. Evocative and encompassing, Harlem Speaks places you at the zenith of this vital cultural movement.
Unpaid Annotation
During the three decades that followed World War I, a stunning outburst of African American culture exploded in America and was eventually labeled the Harlem Renaissance. This book consists, in part, of approximately 25 biographically based essays that examine the life and careers of the writers and poets, critics and political leaders, artists, performers and musicians of that time. Each essay will focus on the relationship of the subject to the Harlem Renaissance and to the development and expression of African American culture. The text, written by experts in their individual fields, will be combined with two full-length CDs featuring music, poetry and literary readings, poems translated into song, interviews, radio broadcasts, discussions and speeches. Among the seminal figures covered are: Langston Hughes Countee Cullen Richard Wright Paul Robeson Josephine Baker Duke Ellington W.E.B. Du Bois Marcus Garvey Zora Neale Hurston Wallace Thurman Bessie Smith Louis Armstrong.

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