Catalogue


Human rights and US foreign policy /
Jan Hancock.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, c2007.
description
x, 226 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0415365775 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780415365772 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, c2007.
isbn
0415365775 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780415365772 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
The hegemonic discourse -- The hegemonic discourse of Wilson and Carter -- Inconsistent application of human rights -- Consistent application of human rights -- War on Terror -- War on Afghanistan -- War on Iraq.
catalogue key
6192484
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [202]-223) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This explosive new book cuts to the heart of contemporary US foreign policy.Officials in the George W Bush administration have consistently used human rights issues to defend and support foreign policy operations and proclaim the centrality of such concerns to decision making. However, the administration has simultaneously opposed human rights multilateral institutions.This book examines how a discourse of human rights has been artificially constructed and implemented in the presentation of US foreign policy. It exposes a contradiction between the project of universal human rights and the discourse of human rights used by the Bush administration. Whereas the former is institutionalised in multilateral legal institutions and is an evolving product of negotiations undertaken between different states reflecting different political cultures, the discourse of human rights expressed by the incumbent Bush administration will be demonstrated to be a function of dominant American civil society interests and values.Delivering three detailed investigations on the role of the human rights discourse in the wars waged against terror, Afghanistan and Iraq that have dominated the foreign policy initiatives undertaken by the George W Bush presidency, this book will be of interest to advanced students and researchers of US foreign policy, human rights, international relations and security studies.
Back Cover Copy
This book analyzes the role of human rights in the foreign policy of the George W. Bush Administrations.References to human rights, freedom and democracy became prominent explanations for post-9/11 foreign policy, yet human rights have been neither impartially nor universally integrated into decision-making. Jan Hancock addresses this apparent paradox by considering three distinct explanations. The first position holds that human rights form a constitutive foreign policy goal, the second that evident double standards refute the first perspective. This book seeks to progress beyond this familiar discussion by employing a Foucaultian method of discourse analysis to suggest a third explanation. Through this analysis, the author examines how a discourse of human rights has been artificially produced and implemented in the presentation of US foreign policy. This illuminating study builds on a wealth of primary source evidence from human rights organizations to document the contradictions between the claims and practice of human rights made by the Bush Administrations, as well as the political significance of denying this disjuncture.Human Rights and US Foreign Policywill be of interest to advanced students and researchers of US foreign policy, human rights, international relations and security studies.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This explosive study cuts to the heart of contemporary US foreign policy, exposing a contradiction between the project of universal human rights and the human rights issues used by the Bush administration to further its agenda.
Main Description
This book analyzes the role of human rights in the foreign policy of the George W. Bush Administrations. References to human rights, freedom and democracy became prominent explanations for post-9/11 foreign policy, yet human rights have been neither impartially nor universally integrated into decision-making. Jan Hancock addresses this apparent paradox by considering three distinct explanations. The first position holds that human rights form a constitutive foreign policy goal, the second that evident double standards refute the first perspective. This book seeks to progress beyond this familiar discussion by employing a Foucaultian method of discourse analysis to suggest a third explanation. Through this analysis, the author examines how a discourse of human rights has been artificially produced and implemented in the presentation of US foreign policy. This illuminating study builds on a wealth of primary source evidence from human rights organizations to document the contradictions between the claims and practice of human rights made by the Bush Administrations, as well as the political significance of denying this disjuncture. Human Rights and US Foreign Policywill be of interest to advanced students and researchers of US foreign policy, human rights, international relations and security studies.
Table of Contents
Human Rights Discourse in Foreign Policy Theory and Practice
Introduction
The Hegemonic Discourse
The Hegemonic Discourse of Wilson and Carter
Inconsistent Application of Human Rights
Consistent Application of Human Rights
Case Studies
War on Terror
War on Afghanistan
War on Iraq
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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