Catalogue


Being Arab : ethnic and religious identity building among second generation youth in Montréal /
Paul Eid.
imprint
Montréal, Québec : McGill-Queen's University Press ; Chesham : Combined Academic [distributor], c2007.
description
xvi, 255 p.
ISBN
0773532218 (hbk.), 9780773532212 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montréal, Québec : McGill-Queen's University Press ; Chesham : Combined Academic [distributor], c2007.
isbn
0773532218 (hbk.)
9780773532212 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6189848
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Arabs in North America are often perceived to be a monolithic group. 'Being Arab' explores how Muslim and Christian Arab-Canadian youth actually negotiate their ethnic and religious identities.
Main Description
Arabs in North America are often perceived to be a monolithic group. Being Arab explores how Muslim and Christian Arab-Canadian youth actually negotiate their ethnic and religious identities. Focusing on the experiences of students from five colleges in Montreal, Paul Eid considers the influence of parental socialization, gender-related traditionalism, and perceived discrimination and stereotyping. Eid looks at the significance of religion to ethnic identity building, a largely understudied issue in ethnic studies, and the extent to which social and cultural practices are structured along ethnic and religious lines. Being Arab also analyzes whether gendered traditions act as identity markers for young Canadians of Arab descent and whether men and women hold different views on traditional gender roles, especially regarding power within romantic relationships and sexuality.Being Arab pays close attention to the views of second-generation Arab-Canadians about prejudice and discrimination in Canadian society, particularly in the media. Eid finds that the Arab youth in this study generally feel accepted by Canadians but often downplay their Arab background as a way to ward off anticipated prejudice. He also offers an insightful account of why children of Arab immigrants seem to experience and react differently to intolerance in Canada and in France.
Main Description
Arabs in North America are often perceived to be a monolithic group.Being Arabexplores how Muslim and Christian Arab-Canadian youth actually negotiate their ethnic and religious identities. Focusing on the experiences of students from five colleges in Montreal, Paul Eid considers the influence of parental socialization, gender-related traditionalism, and perceived discrimination and stereotyping. Eid looks at the significance of religion to ethnic identity building, a largely understudied issue in ethnic studies, and the extent to which social and cultural practices are structured along ethnic and religious lines.Being Arabalso analyzes whether gendered traditions act as identity markers for young Canadians of Arab descent and whether men and women hold different views on traditional gender roles, especially regarding power within romantic relationships and sexuality.Being Arabpays close attention to the views of second-generation Arab-Canadians about prejudice and discrimination in Canadian society, particularly in the media. Eid finds that the Arab youth in this study generally feel accepted by Canadians but often downplay their Arab background as a way to ward off anticipated prejudice. He also offers an insightful account of why children of Arab immigrants seem to experience and react differently to intolerance in Canada and in France.
Main Description
Arabs in North America are often perceived to be a monolithic group. Being Arab explores how Muslim and Christian Arab-Canadian youth actually negotiate their ethnic and religious identities. Focusing on the experiences of students from five colleges in Montreal, Paul Eid considers the influence of parental socialization, gender-related traditionalism, and perceived discrimination and stereotyping. Eid looks at the significance of religion to ethnic identity building, a largely understudied issue in ethnic studies, and the extent to which social and cultural practices are structured along ethnic and religious lines. Being Arab also analyzes whether gendered traditions act as identity markers for young Canadians of Arab descent and whether men and women hold different views on traditional gender roles, especially regarding power within romantic relationships and sexuality. Being Arab pays close attention to the views of second-generation Arab-Canadians about prejudice and discrimination in Canadian society, particularly in the media. Eid finds that the Arab youth in this study generally feel accepted by Canadians but often downplay their Arab background as a way to ward off anticipated prejudice. He also offers an insightful account of why children of Arab immigrants seem to experience and react differently to intolerance in Canada and in France.
Table of Contents
The Arab presence and identity in Canadap. 3
Historical background of Arab immigration to Canadap. 3
National identity in the postcolonial Arab world : the role of religionp. 13
A sociodemographic profile of Arab Canadians todayp. 16
Building ethnic and religious identityp. 20
Deconstructing ethnic identityp. 20
When religion and ethnicity meetp. 32
Methodological concernsp. 41
Ingroup and outgroup boundaries : structural factorsp. 47
The role of prejudice and discriminationp. 47
Gender traditions as ethnoreligious identity markersp. 57
The place of ethnicity in their livesp. 62
The global index of ethnic identity : a quantitative outlookp. 63
Self-labelling patternsp. 65
Attitudes towards ethnic endogamyp. 74
Cultural exposure and practicep. 81
Ingroup friendshipp. 86
Parental commitment to ethnic identity transmissionp. 93
The place of religion in their livesp. 103
The global index of religious identity : quantitative outlookp. 103
The importance of religion in their livesp. 106
Attitudes towards religious endogamyp. 109
Ritual observancep. 112
Participation in religious social affairsp. 118
Concluding remarksp. 119
Attitudes toward gender traditionsp. 122
Gender tradition scale : a quantitative lookp. 124
Marital power relationsp. 125
Premarital virginityp. 134
Premarital datingp. 142
Female virginity and family reputationp. 146
Perceived prejudice and discriminationp. 151
Perceived negative stereotypingp. 154
Sef-experienced anti-Arab discrminationp. 166
A comparison with Francep. 174
Variable and index measurement
Coding of variables
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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