Catalogue


Business-government relations in prewar Japan /
Peter von Staden.
imprint
London : Routledge, 2007.
description
p. cm.
ISBN
0415399033 (hbk.), 9780415399036 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Routledge, 2007.
isbn
0415399033 (hbk.)
9780415399036 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6187730
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Staden's book is worthy of careful reading to understand Japan's prewar situation of the iron and steel industry, which eventually led to the formation of Japan Steel Corporation. Moreover, it will enable readers to realize the general relationship among the bureaucrats, politicians, and business people in those years.'- Etsuo ABE, Meiji University, Enterprise and Society, March 2009
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
For the business and government relationship in Japan, the pre-war period was an era of considerable change. This text explores how their relationship worked during the period 1916-1934.
Main Description
For the business and government relationship in Japan, the pre-war period was an era of considerable change. Framed by Japan's nation-building efforts, the relationship adapted and evolved with the often fluid economic and political circumstances. As both business and government had vested interests in the direction and success of Japan's industrialization process, on one level they became partners. At the same time, though, they were both stakeholders in the fiercely competitive iron and steel industry. This book explores how that partner-competitor relationship worked during the amalgamation of this strategic industry from 1916 to 1934, demonstrating how both parties engaged in meaningful negotiation through the open forum of the Shingikai - or Councils of Deliberation - throughout the pre-war period. Drawing upon the original minutes of the debates, it shows the ways in which the participants defended their vested interests and sought to forge agreement, taking the forum seriously as a means ofinfluencing outcomes, and not simply as a mere exercise of artifice deployed to shroud the real locus of decision-making. Business-Government Relations in Prewar Japan is an important contribution to the literature on the relationship between government and business in pre-war Japan.
Main Description
For the business and government relationship in Japan, the pre-war period was an era of considerable change. Framed by Japan's nation-building efforts, the relationship adapted and evolved with the often fluid economic and political circumstances. As both business and government had vested interests in the direction and success of Japan's industrialization process, on one level they became partners. At the same time, though, they were both stakeholders in the fiercely competitive iron and steel industry. This book explores how that partner-competitor relationship worked during the amalgamation of this strategic industry from 1916 to 1934, demonstrating how both parties engaged in meaningful negotiation through the open forum of the Shingikai - or Councils of Deliberation - throughout the pre-war period. Drawing upon the original minutes of the debates, it shows the ways in which the participants defended their vested interests and sought to forge agreement, taking the forum seriously as a means of influencing outcomes, and not simply as a mere exercise of artifice deployed to shroud the real locus of decision-making. Business-Government Relations in Prewar Japanis an important contribution to the literature on the relationship between government and business in pre-war Japan.
Back Cover Copy
For the business and government relationship in Japan, the pre-war period was an era of considerable change. Framed by Japan's nation-building efforts, the relationship adapted and evolved with the often fluid economic and political circumstances. As both business and government had vested interests in the direction and success of Japan's industrialization process, on one level they became partners. At the same time, though, they were both stakeholders in the fiercely competitive iron and steel industry.This book explores how that partner-competitor relationship worked during the amalgamation of this strategic industry from 1916 to 1934, demonstrating how both parties engaged in meaningful negotiation through the open forum of the Shingikai - or Councils of Deliberation - throughout the pre-war period. Drawing upon the original minutes of the debates, it shows the ways in which the participants defended their vested interests and sought to forge agreement, taking the forum seriously as a means of influencing outcomes, and not simply as a mere exercise of artifice deployed to shroud the real locus of decision-making. Business-Government Relations in Prewar Japan is an important contribution to the literature on the relationship between government and business in pre-war Japan.
Back Cover Copy
This is a much-needed exploration on the relationship between government and business in pre-war Japan. For many observers of Japanese affairs, it is presumed that covert, secretive and exclusive government and business interaction is an inherent feature of the political decision-making process. The received wisdom maintains that there stands a kuromaku - or black curtain - between those who are part of the process and those on the outside. Based on original archival material, the recorded minutes of Shingikai, this book challenges the conventional analysis of relations between Japanese government and businesses, showing how both parties engaged in meaningful negotiation through the open forum of the Shingikai - or Councils of Deliberation - during the pre-war period.Peter von Staden gives a consideration of the reasons why government and business relations in Japan are usually taken to be so secretive, and goes on to explain the importance of the Shingikai forum in the formulation of law, and the ways in which government and business sought to achieve cooperation in coping with such formidable problems as strong competition from overseas and protracted economic instability. This interesting text makes an important contribution to the literature, considering periods which have often been neglected by scholars.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Historical legacy, learning and independence in the business and government relationship
Channels of Communication
The War Years 1916-1917
Coping With The Immediate Post-war Economic Chaos 1919-1921
Towards Amalgamation 1921 - 1934
Conclusions
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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