Catalogue


The elephant and the dragon : the rise of India and China and what it means for all of us /
Robyn Meredith.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton & Company, c2007.
description
252 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0393062368 (hardcover), 9780393062366 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton & Company, c2007.
isbn
0393062368 (hardcover)
9780393062366 (hardcover)
contents note
Where Mao meets the middle class -- From the spinning wheel to the fiber optic wire -- Made by America in China -- The Internet's spice route -- The disassembly line -- India's cultural revolution -- Revolution by dinner party -- Geopolitics mixed with oil and water -- A catalyst for competitiveness.
catalogue key
6185915
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Galbraith, Doris. 2008/01/29.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-236) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Helen Bernstein Book Award, USA, 2008 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-03-01:
The Elephant and the Dragon is a highly engrossing, mind-gripping book all the way to the end. Meredith, a Forbes foreign correspondent, provides an objective, comprehensive, balanced presentation of the rapidly growing economies of India and China. She describes how these two countries are being transformed by major economic and political reforms and considers the implications of their stunning emergence for the US and the rest of the world. Her analysis of the colossal, tragic failure of Maoist economic and social planning and the dazzling success of the robust pragmatism of Deng is embellished with lucid reasoning. Her expression--made in China by Americans or Europeans--is witty and effective. Meredith is correct in asserting that India's delayed economic emergence was due to a misperception of colonial history and draconic inward-looking economic planning. With its large supply of quality English-speaking engineers, India has become the world's back office, which turbocharged the Indian economy into a stratosphere of economic growth. This reviewer concurs with Meredith's view that the advance of India and China is a nonzero-sum game, i.e., it will benefit all the countries. A timely, fascinating book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers; undergraduate and graduate students; professionals. C. J. Talele Columbia State Community College
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2007-05-14:
Meredith, who covers India and China for Forbes, upends conventional wisdom in this well-reported book, arguing that the U.S. shouldn't fear these two rising economic powers. The U.S. ("buyer to the world") and China ("factory to the world") have, respectively, the largest and fourth largest economies, but they will reach parity in 2015. Though American politicians tax Chinese goods, Meredith points out that Americans actually gain from the undervalued yuan: our companies profit from the cheap goods the Chinese manufacture. Meanwhile, India ("backoffice to the world") has picked up most of the one million white-collar jobs that moved out of the U.S. by 2003. But Meredith notes that for every dollar that goes overseas, $1.94 of wealth is created-all but 33 cents of which returns to the U.S. Protrade and antiprotectionist, she makes a compelling argument that China is doing better than India because it moved toward a market economy in 1978, while India began to liberalize in 1991. She also looks critically at each country's plans for the future, noting that China's citizens save more, while India's infrastructure and education system are falling behind. She concludes that "if inward-facing India and communist China can transform themselves, so can the United States of America." (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal,
Publishers Weekly, May 2007
Booklist, June 2007
San Francisco Chronicle, July 2007
Wall Street Journal, July 2007
Globe & Mail, September 2007
Choice, March 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A compelling look at the major changes in store as America faces increasing competition from two emerging Asian giants. Not since the United States rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategies - strategies we must understand in order to survive in the new global economy. The Elephant and the Dragon tells how these two Asian nations, each with more than a billion people, have spurred a new "gold rush," and what this will mean for the rest of the world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Not since the US rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations. This text tells how these two nations have spurred a new 'gold rush' and what this will mean for the rest of the world.
Long Description
A compelling look at the major changes in store as America faces increasing competition from two emerging Asian giants. In the streets of India, camels pull carts loaded with construction materials, and monkeys race across roads, dodging cars. In China, men in Mao jackets pedal bicycles along newly built highways, past skyscrapers sprouting like bamboo. Yet exotic India is as near as the voice answering an 800 number for one dollar an hour. Communist China is as close as the nearest Wal-Mart, its shelves full of goods made in Chinese factories. Not since the United States rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategies--strategies we must understand in order to survive in the new global economy. "The Elephant and the Dragon" tells how these two Asian nations, each with more than a billion people, have spurred a new "gold rush," and what this will mean for the rest of the world.
Unpaid Annotation
Today, India is as near as the voice answering an 800 number for one dollar an hour, and China is as close as the nearest Wal-Mart. Not since the United States rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategies--strategies we must understand in order to survive in the new global economy. This book is the first to compare and contrast how these two Asian nations, each with more than a billion people, are spurring a new "gold rush," and what this will mean for the rest of the world.--From publisher description.
Main Description
In the streets of India, camels pull carts loaded with construction materials, and monkeys race across roads, dodging cars. In China, men in Mao jackets pedal bicycles along newly built highways, past skyscrapers sprouting like bamboo. Yet exotic India is as near as the voice answering an 800 number for one dollar an hour. Communist China is as close as the nearest Wal-Mart, its shelves full of goods made in Chinese factories. Not since the United States rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategiesstrategies we must understand in order to survive in the new global economy. The Elephant and the Dragon tells how these two Asian nations, each with more than a billion people, have spurred a new "gold rush," and what this will mean for the rest of the world.
Main Description
A compelling look at the major changes in store as America faces increasing competition from two emerging Asian giants.Not since the United States rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategies - strategies we must understand in order to survive in the new global economy. The Elephant and the Dragon tells how these two Asian nations, each with more than a billion people, have spurred a new "gold rush," and what this will mean for the rest of the world.
Main Description
A compelling look at the major changes in store as America faces increasing competition from two emerging Asian giants. In the streets of India, camels pull carts loaded with construction materials, and monkeys race across roads, dodging cars. In China, men in Mao jackets pedal bicycles along newly built highways, past skyscrapers sprouting like bamboo. Yet exotic India is as near as the voice answering an 800 number for one dollar an hour. Communist China is as close as the nearest Wal-Mart, its shelves full of goods made in Chinese factories. Not since the United States rose to prominence a century ago have we seen such tectonic shifts in global power; but India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategies--strategies we must understand in order to survive in the new global economy. The Elephant and the Dragon tells how these two Asian nations, each with more than a billion people, have spurred a new "gold rush," and what this will mean for the rest of the world.
Table of Contents
Introduction : tectonic economicsp. 9
Where Mao meets the middle classp. 15
From the spinning wheel to the fiber-optic wirep. 38
Made by America in Chinap. 58
The Internet's spice routep. 76
The disassembly linep. 97
India's cultural revolutionp. 117
Revolution by dinner partyp. 138
Geopolitics mixed with oil and waterp. 159
A catalyst for competitivenessp. 188
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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