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Architects of empire : the Duke of Wellington and his brothers /
John Severn.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.
description
xiii, 602 p.
ISBN
0806138106 (alk. paper), 9780806138107 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.
isbn
0806138106 (alk. paper)
9780806138107 (alk. paper)
contents note
The Wellesleys of County Meath -- Richard takes charge -- The India adventure begins -- Tiger hunt -- Arthur : from Mysore to the Maratha War -- Henry steps forward -- End of the first act : the Maratha War -- Entr'acte I -- Toil and trouble -- The Wellesleys in Spain : the first phase -- The Wellesleys at war -- Reversal of fortunes -- Waterloo -- Entr'acte II -- Encore for the Wellesleys -- Irreconcilable differences -- View from across the aisle -- The final years.
catalogue key
6185809
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 577-587) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-04-01:
There were five Wellesley brothers, and they led rich, full lives. The eldest, Richard, made the family's fortune as governor-general of India, and was condescending to Arthur, the future Duke of Wellington; Arthur believed his elder brother was careless in managing his personal affairs. Arthur's fame and fortune came about because of the patronage of his brother, who sent him to fight the Mysore and Maratha wars. Younger brother Henry served as a go-between between the two and massaged their elevated egos. Richard and Arthur depended on each other, but that did not prevent them from becoming alienated. Humility was not a family trait. Even after the fame of Waterloo, Wellington felt Richard treated him as an inferior; for Richard, "Arthur has been my evil genius; when I fall he rises, to adorn himself with the plumes which I shed." They reconciled in the end, in 1838. This is a fascinating tale of a family saga, well told. It adds considerably to the vast corpus of work on the Iron Duke, who lived the longest of the extraordinary lives of the five brothers and their unloved mother. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. R. D. Long Eastern Michigan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2007
Choice, April 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A soldier and statesman for the ages, the Duke of Wellington is a towering figure in world history. John Severn now offers a fresh look at the man born Arthur Wellesley to show that his career was very much a family affair, a lifelong series of interactions with his brothers and their common Anglo-Irish heritage. The untold story of a great family drama, Architects of Empirepaints a new picture of the era through the collective biography of Wellesley and his siblings. Severn takes readers from the British Raj in India to the battlefields of the Napoleonic Wars to the halls of Parliament as he traces the rise of the five brothers from obscurity to prominence. Severn covers both the imperial Indian period before 1800 and the domestic political period after 1820, describing the wide range of experiences Arthur and his brothers lived through. Architects of Empirebrings together in a single volume a grand story that before now was discernible only through political or military analysis. Weaving the personal history of the brothers into a captivating narrative, it tells of sibling rivalry among men who were by turns generous and supportive, then insensitive and cruel. Whereas other historians have minimized the importance of family ties, Severn provides an unusually nuanced understanding of the Duke of Wellington. Architects of Empirecasts his career in a new light-one that will surprise those who believe they already know the man.
Main Description
The collective biography of a remarkable man and his family A soldier and statesman for the ages, the Duke of Wellington is a towering figure in world history. John Severn now offers a fresh look at the man born Arthur Wellesley to show that his career was very much a family affair, a lifelong series of interactions with his brothers and their common Anglo-Irish heritage. The untold story of a great family drama, Architects of Empirepaints a new picture of the era through the collective biography of Wellesley and his siblings. Severn takes readers from the British Raj in India to the battlefields of the Napoleonic Wars to the halls of Parliament as he traces the rise of the five brothers from obscurity to prominence. Severn covers both the imperial Indian period before 1800 and the domestic political period after 1820, describing the wide range of experiences Arthur and his brothers lived through. Architects of Empirebrings together in a single volume a grand story that before now was discernible only through political or military analysis. Weaving the personal history of the brothers into a captivating narrative, it tells of sibling rivalry among men who were by turns generous and supportive, then insensitive and cruel. Whereas other historians have minimized the importance of family ties, Severn provides an unusually nuanced understanding of the Duke of Wellington. Architects of Empirecasts his career in a new light--one that will surprise those who believe they already know the man.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
The Wellesleys of County Meathp. 3
Richard Takes Chargep. 24
The India Adventure Beginsp. 65
Tiger Huntp. 92
Arthur: From Mysore to the Maratha Warp. 119
Henry Steps Forwardp. 138
End of the First Act: The Maratha Warp. 160
Entr'acte Ip. 195
Toil and Troublep. 223
The Wellesleys in Spain: The First Phasep. 252
The Wellesleys at Warp. 291
Reversal of Fortunesp. 328
Waterloop. 359
Entr'acte IIp. 384
Encore for the Wellesleysp. 404
Irreconcilable Differencesp. 435
View from Across the Aislep. 464
The Final Yearsp. 502
Notesp. 541
Bibliographyp. 577
Indexp. 589
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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