Catalogue


A pre-Columbian world /
Jeffrey Quilter and Mary Miller, eds.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Dumbarton Oaks Research Library & Collection : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2006.
description
395 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
ISBN
088402315X (alk. paper), 9780884023159 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Dumbarton Oaks Research Library & Collection : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2006.
isbn
088402315X (alk. paper)
9780884023159 (alk. paper)
general note
From a symposium at Dumbarton Oaks 6 and 7 October 2001.
catalogue key
6185727
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-09-01:
These 10 thought-provoking articles provide a broad, generalist approach to the interpretation of anthropological, historical, and art historical subjects and develop a unitary vision of the pre-Columbian past. Regarding North America, Warren DeBoer, writing on the Hopewell, uses iconography, site plans, burial associations, long-distance trade, and Algonkian ethnology to correlate mythology with Hopewell architecture. Robert Hall explores the "big bang" at Cahokia, where the largest Mississippian period site developed over a short time span, and discusses the world view of its inhabitants using the ethnographic record and Mesoamerican connections. Polly Shaafsma and Karl Taube look at the similarities of rain ceremonialism between the Pueblan Southwest and Mesoamerica. Mesoamerica, Central America, and the Andes are represented by Enrique Florescano, who places Teotihuacan within its political contexts; Mary Helms, who focuses on Panama ceramic iconography to elucidate similarities to Mesoamerica and South America; Simon Martin, who compares Moche fine-line painting, Mayan inscriptions, and Mixtex narratives; Anna Blume, who discusses Mayan and European animal transformations; and Tom Dillehay and Ramiro Matos, who use visual imagery in central Andean artifacts and architectural plans. Elizabeth Boone and coeditor Miller provide the introductory and concluding chapters. A must read for students and scholars interested in the underlying similarities within and between pre-Columbian societies in the Americas. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. B. Richardson III University of Pittsburgh
Reviews
Review Quotes
These 10 thought-provoking articles provide a broad, generalist approach to the interpretation of anthropological, historical, and art historical subjects and develop a unitary vision of the pre-Columbian past...A must read for students and scholars interested in the underlying similarities within and between pre-Columbian societies in the Americas.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
The articles in this book conceptualize the ancient New World through new and varied approaches, from iconography to the history of anthropology. The many essays in this volume explore the vast vista of the Pre-Columbian world, including representations of history, memory, and knowledge in Andean visual imagery and Pre-Columbian narrative, the ideology of rain making, and Maya beliefs about animal transformations.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Defining Sample: How We Pursue the Pre-Columbian Past
On Pre-Columbian Narrative: Representation Across the Word-Image
Glimpses of a Common Cosmos? A Brief Look South and North from Panama
Salient Representations of the American Past
Exploring the Mississippian Big Bang at Cahokia
Bringing the Rain: An Ideology of Rain Making in the Pueblo Southwest and Mesoamerica
Teotihuacan in Mesoamerican Political History
Enrique Florescano
History, memory, and Knowledge in Andean Visual Imagery: The Intersection of Art, Architecture, and Landscape
Animal Transformations: The Mixing of Maya and European Fantasy and Belief
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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