Catalogue


Music divided : Bartók's legacy in cold war culture /
Danielle Fosler-Lussier.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
description
xx, 229 p. : ill., port., music ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520249658 (alk. paper), 9780520249653 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
isbn
0520249658 (alk. paper)
9780520249653 (alk. paper)
contents note
Bartók's Concerto for orchestra and the demise of Hungary's "third road" -- A compromised composer : Bartók's music and Western Europe's fresh start -- "Bartók is ours" : the Voice of America and Hungarian control over Bartók's legacy -- Bartók and his publics : defining the "modern classic" -- Beyond the folk song; or, what was Hungarian socialist realist music? -- The "Bartók question" and the politics of dissent : the case of András Mihály -- Epilogue East : Bartók's difficult truths and the Hungarian revolution of 1956 -- Epilogue West : Bartók's legacy and George Rochberg's postmodernity.
catalogue key
6182637
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-219) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is an extremely important, groundbreaking study. The research is impressive and explores a wide variety of resources that span several languages, disciplines, and secondary as well as archival sources. Stylistically uncomplicated and lucidly written, this book is a fascinating piece of reading."--László Somfai, author of Béla Bartók: Composition, Concepts, and Autograph Sources , Editor-in Chief of the Béla Bartók Complete Critical Edition
Flap Copy
"This is an extremely important, groundbreaking study. The research is impressive and explores a wide variety of resources that span several languages, disciplines, and secondary as well as archival sources. Stylistically uncomplicated and lucidly written, this book is a fascinating piece of reading."--LÁszlÓ Somfai, Director of the BartÓk Archives, author of Bela BartÓk: Composition, Concepts, and Autograph Sources
Flap Copy
"This is an extremely important, groundbreaking study. The research is impressive and explores a wide variety of resources that span several languages, disciplines, and secondary as well as archival sources. Stylistically uncomplicated and lucidly written, this book is a fascinating piece of reading."--Laszlo Somfai, author of "Bela Bartok: Composition, Concepts, and Autograph Sources", Editor-in Chief of the "Bela Bartok Complete Critical Edition"
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-12-01:
Fosler-Lussier (Ohio State Univ.) looks at the unwitting role Bela Bartok (1881-1945) and his music played in the politics of the Cold War. In six chapters and two epilogues, she describes the contrasting ways in which the composer's music was used for political purposes on both sides of the Iron Curtain. The book grows out of the author's dissertation, and its success is in part due to her knowledge of the Hungarian language. Fosler-Lussier describes how in the early Cold War period (1945-50) Hungarian Communists were torn between acknowledging Bartok as their most famous composer and ignoring his modernistic works. Commemorating the fifth anniversary of the composer's death, Hungarian Radio devoted broadcasts over several weeks to his music, indicating by omission compositions that were beyond the pale--Duke Blubeard's Castle, the pantomime The Miraculous Mandarin, Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, among other works. On the other hand, considerable emphasis was put on Bartok's choral and solo settings of folk songs. The physical aspects of the book are impressive: clearly set music examples (technical knowledge of music is unnecessary), handsome typography, helpful appendixes. A book for those interested in historical/political studies as well as music. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. R. Stahura emeritus, Ripon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A nuanced analysis . . . . Demonstrates with great clarity relationships between aesthetic questions and broader political and social issues."
"A nuanced analysis . . . . Demonstrates with great clarity relationships between aesthetic questions and broader political and social issues."-- European History Qtly
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Music Divided explores how political pressures affected musical life on both sides of the iron curtain during the early years of the cold war. In this groundbreaking study, Danielle Fosler-Lussier illuminates the pervasive political anxieties of the day through particular attention to artistic, music-theoretical, and propagandistic responses to the music of Hungary's most renowned twentieth-century composer, Béla Bartók. She shows how a tense period of political transition plagued Bartók's music and imperiled those who took a stand on its aesthetic value in the emerging socialist state. Her fascinating investigation of Bartók's reception outside of Hungary demonstrates that Western composers, too, formulated their ideas about musical style under the influence of ever-escalating cold war tensions. Music Divided surveys Bartók's role in provoking negative reactions to "accessible" music from Pierre Boulez, Hermann Scherchen, and Theodor Adorno. It considers Bartók's influence on the youthful compositions and thinking of Bruno Maderna and Karlheinz Stockhausen, and it outlines Bartók's legacy in the music of the Hungarian composers András Mihály, Ferenc Szabó, and Endre Szervánszky. These details reveal the impact of local and international politics on the selection of music for concert and radio programs, on composers' choices about musical style, on government radio propaganda about music, on the development of socialist realism, and on the use of modernism as an instrument of political action.
Long Description
Music Dividedexplores how political pressures affected musical life on both sides of the iron curtain during the early years of the cold war. In this groundbreaking study, Danielle Fosler-Lussier illuminates the pervasive political anxieties of the era through particular attention to artistic, music-theoretical, and propagandistic responses to the music of Hungary's most renowned twentieth-century composer, BÉla BartÓk. She shows how a tense period of political transition plagued BartÓk's music and imperiled those who took a stand on its aesthetic value in the emerging socialist state. Her fascinating investigation of BartÓk's reception outside of Hungary demonstrates that Western composers, too, formulated their ideas about musical style under the influence of ever-escalating cold war tensions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this groundbreaking study, the author illuminates the pervasive political anxieties of the era through particular attention to artistic, music-theoretical, and propagandistic responses to the music of Hungary's most renowned 20th century composer, Béla Bartók.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
Note on Hungarian Pronunciation
Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra and the Demise of Hungary's "Third Road"
A Compromised Composer: Bartok's Music and Western Europe's Fresh Start
"Bartok Is Ours": The Voice of America and Hungarian Control over Bartok's Legacy
Bartok and His Publics: Defining the "Modern Classic"
Beyond the Folk Song or, What Was Hungarian Socialist Realist Music?
The "Bartok Question" and the Politics of Dissent: The Case of Andras Mihaly
Epilogue East: Bartok's Difficult Truths and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956
Epilogue West: Bartok's Legacy and George Rochberg's Postmodernity
Compositions by Bartok Broadcast on Hungarian Radio, 18 September to 1 October 1950
Biographical Notes
Notes Selected
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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