Catalogue


Anglophilia : deference, devotion, and antebellum America /
Elisa Tamarkin.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008.
description
xxxiii, 400 p. : ill.
ISBN
0226789446 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780226789446 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008.
isbn
0226789446 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780226789446 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6182418
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-06-01:
Tamarkin (English, Univ. of California-Irvine) guides readers through an impressively detailed analysis of textual and visual primary sources to demonstrate "an intricate culture of American response" to English institutions and traditions in the antebellum era. The author convinces readers that Anglophilia was not a mere matter of social and intellectual snobbery or conservatism. Instead, Americans representing a variety of backgrounds paid their respects "to the symbolic value of England" as a way of shaping a particularly American democratic identity. Tamarkin astutely suggests that national identity is created by a complex set of practices that not only separate but also welcome, absorb, and adapt selected attributes of other cultures. Her four chapters focus on the US worship of monarchy, nostalgia for the Colonial experience, the reshaping of college life, and, most intriguingly, the participation of African American intellectuals in this cultural project. In addition to examining well-known novels, autobiographies, and travel accounts, Tamarkin has mined an ambitious array of contemporary newspapers, magazines, and popular fiction. Her remarkably close readings of well-chosen paintings and illustrations enrich her demonstration that Anglophilia was a significant component in creating a progressive US national identity. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. E. Krulikowski West Chester University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"To make social and personal stylethe theatrical play of sociability for its own sakea matter of historical investigation, to craft in effect a sociology and anthropology of manners, of aesthetic behavior, in four episodes in antebellum American appropriations of Englishness, is a project that calls not only for ascholarof range, authority, and erudition but also awriterof poise, elegant precision, and sprightly wit. Tamarkin is that rare figure endowed with both capacities."Ross Posnock, Columbia University
"To make social and personal stylethe theatrical play of sociability for its own sakea matter of historical investigation, to craft in effect a sociology and anthropology of manners, of aesthetic behavior, in four episodes in antebellum American appropriations of Englishness, is a project that calls not only for a scholar of range, authority, and erudition but also a writer of poise, elegant precision, and sprightly wit. Tamarkin is that rare figure endowed with both capacities."Ross Posnock, Columbia University
"To make social and personal stylethe theatrical play of sociability for its own sakea matter of historical investigation, to craft in effect a sociology and anthropology of manners, of aesthetic behavior, in four episodes in antebellum American appropriations of Englishness, is a project that calls not only for a scholar of range, authority, and erudition but also a writer of poise, elegant precision, and sprightly wit. Tamarkin is that rare figure endowed with both capacities."
"This pathbreaking work of cultural and social history offers a reconsideration of ways in which Old World symbols and practices were used to shape a post-Revolutionary democratic culture. . . . An impressive contribution to nineteenth-century transatlantic studies."
"The author convinces readers that Anglophilia was not a mere matter of social and intellectual snobbery or conservatism. Instead, Americans representing a variety of backgrounds paid their respects ''to the symbolic value of England'' as a way of shaping a particularly American democratic identity. Tamarkin astutely suggests that national identity is created by a complex set of practices that not only separate but also welcome, absorb, and adapt selected attributes of other cultures....Highly recommended." Choice
"The author convinces readers that Anglophilia was not a mere matter of social and intellectual snobbery or conservatism. Instead, Americans representing a variety of backgrounds paid their respects ''to the symbolic value of England'' as a way of shaping a particularly American democratic identity. Tamarkin astutely suggests that national identity is created by a complex set of practices that not only separate but also welcome, absorb, and adapt selected attributes of other cultures....Highly recommended."Choice
"The author convinces readers that Anglophilia was not a mere matter of social and intellectual snobbery or conservatism. Instead, Americans representing a variety of backgrounds paid their respects 'to the symbolic value of England' as a way of shaping a particularly American democratic identity. Tamarkin astutely suggests that national identity is created by a complex set of practices that not only separate but also welcome, absorb, and adapt selected attributes of other cultures....Highly recommended."
"Tamarkin's investigation into the varieties of American Anglophilia in the nineteenth century yields an entirely fresh and at times brightly comic perspective on this period in the nation's cultural life, and shows that the cultural semiotics of Englishness remains vital in our own time. Her stylistic brilliancethe wit of this study is perfectly calibrated to its eruditionspeaks to a real literary sensibility; it underwrites both her extraordinary interpretive skills as a reader of verbal and visual representations, and an exuberant practice of archival research unhampered by foregone conclusions."Nancy Ruttenburg, New York University
"By bringing together a number of well-known subjectss in a creative way, Tamarkin provides readers with a fresh look at the complex relationship that evolved between the United States and England in the years after the American Revolution."
"Anglophiliatakes a commonsensical subjectnineteenth-century adulation for and emulation of British cultureand shows us both why it doesn't mean what we thought and why it's worthy of closer study and more careful attention. This is a rare gem of a book: commandingly scholarly, interdisciplinary, original, arresting in its analyses, and utterly worthwhile in its arguments."Dana Nelson, Vanderbilt University
" Anglophilia takes a commonsensical subjectnineteenth-century adulation for and emulation of British cultureand shows us both why it doesn't mean what we thought and why it's worthy of closer study and more careful attention. This is a rare gem of a book: commandingly scholarly, interdisciplinary, original, arresting in its analyses, and utterly worthwhile in its arguments."Dana Nelson, Vanderbilt University
"Anglophiliais in every respect a model of scholarship. The book''s argument is original, persuasive, engaging, and frequently comic . . . the prose, both erudite and readable. . . .Anyone who has ever wondered, for instance, why Americans still gawk so lovingly at Buckingham Palace . . . will admire this compelling work of scholarship."Brian Cowlishaw,Southwest Journal of Cultures
" Anglophilia takes a commonsensical subjectnineteenth-century adulation for and emulation of British cultureand shows us both why it doesn't mean what we thought and why it's worthy of closer study and more careful attention. This is a rare gem of a book: commandingly scholarly, interdisciplinary, original, arresting in its analyses, and utterly worthwhile in its arguments."
" Anglophilia is in every respect a model of scholarship. The book's argument is original, persuasive, engaging, and frequently comic . . . the prose, both erudite and readable. . . .Anyone who has ever wondered, for instance, why Americans still gawk so lovingly at Buckingham Palace . . . will admire this compelling work of scholarship."
" Anglophilia is in every respect a model of scholarship. The book''s argument is original, persuasive, engaging, and frequently comic . . . the prose, both erudite and readable. . . .Anyone who has ever wondered, for instance, why Americans still gawk so lovingly at Buckingham Palace . . . will admire this compelling work of scholarship."Brian Cowlishaw, Southwest Journal of Cultures
"Anglophilia demonstrates Herculean research, scholarly precision, a sophisticated critical acumen, and a genuinely unique writer's voice. Tamarkin's book accounts for American nationalism while re-attaching it to English history and English culture. It fills, moreover, a kind of cultural historical vacuum, since so much scholarship has focused traditionally on American nationalism, immigration, and nativism, so that the story of a national cultural psychology of aspiring Englishness gets all but lost. Anglophiliaprovides a consistently nuanced portrait of the simultaneous fantasies of and aversions for the royalist "Old World" that the United States presumably had left behind. It argues convincingly for the symbolic power England wielded on the national cultural imaginary. Those involved in historical literature about the American Revolution will be struck with the genuinely new way Tamarkin goes about reading the cultural politics of historical narrative. Besides the mellifluous ease and brilliant wit of Tamarkin's prose, the most impressive feature of this book may be its ambidextrous handling of historical artifact and theoretical idea." Philip Gould, Brown University
" Anglophilia demonstrates Herculean research, scholarly precision, a sophisticated critical acumen, and a genuinely unique writer's voice. Tamarkin's book accounts for American nationalism while re-attaching it to English history and English culture. It fills, moreover, a kind of cultural historical vacuum, since so much scholarship has focused traditionally on American nationalism, immigration, and nativism, so that the story of a national cultural psychology of aspiring Englishness gets all but lost. Anglophilia provides a consistently nuanced portrait of the simultaneous fantasies of and aversions for the royalist "Old World" that the United States presumably had left behind. It argues convincingly for the symbolic power England wielded on the national cultural imaginary. Those involved in historical literature about the American Revolution will be struck with the genuinely new way Tamarkin goes about reading the cultural politics of historical narrative. Besides the mellifluous ease and brilliant wit of Tamarkin's prose, the most impressive feature of this book may be its ambidextrous handling of historical artifact and theoretical idea." Philip Gould, Brown University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Anglophiliacharts the phenomenon of the love of Britain that emerged after the Revolution and remains in the character of U.S. society and class, the style of academic life, and the idea of American intellectualism. But as Tamarkin shows, this Anglophilia was more than just an elite nostalgia; it was popular devotion that made reverence for British tradition instrumental to the psychological innovations of democracy. Anglophilia spoke to fantasies of cultural belonging, polite sociability, and, finally, deference itself as an affective practice within egalitarian politics. Tamarkin traces the wide-ranging effects of anglophilia on American literature, art and intellectual life in the early nineteenth century, as well as its influence in arguments against slavery, in the politics of Union, and in the dialectics of liberty and loyalty before the civil war. By working beyond narratives of British influence, Tamarkin highlights a more intricate culture of American response, one that included Whig elites, college students, radical democrats, urban immigrants, and African Americans. Ultimately,Anglophilaargues that that the love of Britain was not simply a fetish or form of shame-a release from the burdens of American culture-but an anachronistic structure of attachement in which U.S. Identity was lived in other languages of national expression.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Elisa Tamarkin traces the wide-ranging effects of Anglophilia on American literature, art and intellectual life in the early 19th century, as well as its influence in arguments against slavery, in the politics of the Union, and in the dialectics of liberty and loyalty before the Civil War.
Main Description
Anglophilia charts the phenomenon of the love of Britain that emerged after the Revolution and remains in the character of U.S. society and class, the style of academic life, and the idea of American intellectualism. But as Tamarkin shows, this Anglophilia was more than just an elite nostalgia; it was popular devotion that made reverence for British tradition instrumental to the psychological innovations of democracy. Anglophilia spoke to fantasies of cultural belonging, polite sociability, and, finally, deference itself as an affective practice within egalitarian politics. Tamarkin traces the wide-ranging effects of anglophilia on American literature, art and intellectual life in the early nineteenth century, as well as its influence in arguments against slavery, in the politics of Union, and in the dialectics of liberty and loyalty before the civil war. By working beyond narratives of British influence, Tamarkin highlights a more intricate culture of American response, one that included Whig elites, college students, radical democrats, urban immigrants, and African Americans. Ultimately, Anglophila argues that that the love of Britain was not simply a fetish or form of shame-a release from the burdens of American culture-but an anachronistic structure of attachement in which U.S. Identity was lived in other languages of national expression.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Preface: Paying Respectsp. xv
Monarch-Love; or, How the Prince of Wales Saved the Unionp. 1
"E Pluribus Unum, or, in English, Welcome to the Prince"p. 3
Anachronism and Style (More Twaddle about the Queen)p. 30
Sovereigns, Substitutes, and Emptinessp. 41
The Renewal and Uses of Filial Pietyp. 58
Hawthorne's Mystic Threadsp. 76
Imperial Nostalgia: American Elegies for British Empirep. 87
The Dullness of Patriotismp. 87
A Case of Surrenderp. 94
Delicacies of Warp. 104
The Elegiac Return to Dependencep. 113
Empire of Beautyp. 127
Loyal Archives and the Reluctance to Rebelp. 149
Women Folks Are Natural Tories: Love in the Age of Revolutionp. 165
Freedom and Deference: Society, Antislavery, and Black Intellectualismp. 178
The Importance of Being Englishp. 180
Caste and Conductp. 191
The Chivalry of Antislaveryp. 199
The Sociability of Antislavery (and Diversions of Reform)p. 213
Black Anglo-Saxonismp. 231
The Anglophile Academyp. 247
The Social Life of Collegep. 247
The Sincerity of Dilettantesp. 270
The English Accentp. 287
Pomp and Circumstance; or, How to Be a Chump. 298
Coda: Education and Nostalgiap. 312
Notesp. 325
Indexp. 383
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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