Catalogue

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Challenging China : struggle and hope in an era of change /
edited by Sharon Hom and Stacy Mosher.
imprint
New York : New Press, 2007.
description
xvii, 313 p.
ISBN
1595581324, 9781595581327
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New Press, 2007.
isbn
1595581324
9781595581327
general note
"Published in cojunction with Human Rights in China"--t.p.
catalogue key
6175194
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2007-04-23:
Rather than the usual focus on China's spectacular economic growth since the 1980s and the new markets it opens for Western capital, this wide-ranging collection of voices from within China provides a forceful and timely corrective by examining the burgeoning superpower's systemic human rights abuses and the very mixed results of economic "liberation" for the average Chinese without political reform. Editors Hom (executive director of the NGO Human Rights in China) and Mosher (editor of its journal) gather writings from activists, scholars, journalists, former government officials and artists-much of it culled from online sources and translated here for the first time. These accounts starkly unmask deep-seated corruption and the ironfisted tactics of China's ruling class, while revealing rising individual and collective resistance. Five sections, headed by poignant verses and succinct introductions, cover ordeals on many fronts-like the government's cynical suppression of publicity about AIDS cases, its plundering of natural resources and forcible relocations (leading to mass unrest like 2004's uprising against the Pubugou Dam project), rising teen prostitution and the Internet's role in a fledgling civil society-as well as personal expressions of spiritual revolt from Falun Gong and Christianity to protest art. Often fascinating and eloquent, these analyses, reports, testimonials and poems paint a vivid portrait of the challenges facing China and the world as its nearly 1.4 billion citizens increasingly lay claim to basic human rights. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2007-06-01:
Hom and Mosher, both associated with Human Rights in China (HRIC), founded by Chinese scientists and scholars to promote a human rights agenda in their country, present 27 short essays, interviews, and reports from dissidents, activists, and journalists. These form a mosaic that challenges the image of middle-class professionals in brassy Shanghai and stately Beijing successfully leading their country into global consumerism and mass consumption. Instead, we see abandoned migrants, exploited coal miners, prostitution, imprisoned priests, persecuted Falun Gong members, and incompetence. Recommended for larger libraries. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, April 2007
Booklist, June 2007
Library Journal, June 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
A fascinating and complex insiders' portrait of contemporary life inside the monolith, written by dissidents, activists, and journalists. "'"Kill 200,000 for 20 years of stability" is not going to be found in any official transcripts. The officially recorded equivalent, "Stability above all else," appears much more refined, with no taint of bloodshed, but there's not a single person in China who cannot understand its implication.'"--from "Challenging China" With the U.S./China trade deficit at record levels, interest in the contemporary Chinese experience is keen and growing. But as America contemplates China's growing economic dominance, attention is shifting away from its poor record on human rights and the living conditions of its population. "Challenging China" gives us a rare and important portrait of contemporary life within China. Mixing personal stories with sober analysis, this revealing book embraces a broad range of social issues, from labor conditions and rural struggles to health and religion. "Challenging China" also offers rare glimpses of the country's social problems, from underage prostitution to the unlikely situation in which, as the authorities continue to arrest and imprison priests and evangelists involved in China's unsanctioned churches, academics have become the social spokesmen for a faith they do not personally profess. Finally, the book includes the first-ever first-hand accounts to come out of China from dissidents and their families--including accounts by the relatives of those imprisoned or executed and descriptions of life in exile. As companies from Microsoft to Wal-Mart open branches in China, "Challenging China" gives a revealing portraitof a country whose internal politics we can no longer afford to ignore. "Challenging China" includes: - The story of life beneath the overpass of Beijing's Second Loop where more than two hundred people have taken shelter, having come from all over China to seek justice through petitions to the central authorities - The account of a dissident Internet essayist who, inspired by the memoir of an exiled Tiananmen veteran, reflects on the experience of exile within his own country - A glimpse into the efforts and frustrations of a domestic NGO dedicated to addressing China's AIDS tragedy, and to keeping the outside world informed, by Ha Jin, director of the Beijing Aizhixing Institute
Main Description
A fascinating and complex insiders' portrait of contemporary life inside the monolith, written by dissidents, activists, and journalists. '"Kill 200,000 for 20 years of stability" is not going to be found in any official transcripts. The officially recorded equivalent, "Stability above all else," appears much more refined, with no taint of bloodshed, but there's not a single person in China who cannot understand its implication.'--from Challenging China With the U.S./China trade deficit at record levels, interest in the contemporary Chinese experience is keen and growing. But as America contemplates China's growing economic dominance, attention is shifting away from its poor record on human rights and the living conditions of its population. Challenging China gives us a rare and important portrait of contemporary life within China. Mixing personal stories with sober analysis, this revealing book embraces a broad range of social issues, from labor conditions and rural struggles to health and religion. Challenging China also offers rare glimpses of the country's social problems, from underage prostitution to the unlikely situation in which, as the authorities continue to arrest and imprison priests and evangelists involved in China's unsanctioned churches, academics have become the social spokesmen for a faith they do not personally profess. Finally, the book includes the first-ever first-hand accounts to come out of China from dissidents and their families--including accounts by the relatives of those imprisoned or executed and descriptions of life in exile. As companies from Microsoft to Wal-Mart open branches in China, Challenging China gives a revealing portrait of a country whose internal politics we can no longer afford to ignore. Challenging China includes: The story of life beneath the overpass of Beijing's Second Loop where more than two hundred people have taken shelter, having come from all over China to seek justice through petitions to the central authorities The account of a dissident Internet essayist who, inspired by the memoir of an exiled Tiananmen veteran, reflects on the experience of exile within his own country A glimpse into the efforts and frustrations of a domestic NGO dedicated to addressing China's AIDS tragedy, and to keeping the outside world informed, by Ha Jin, director of the Beijing Aizhixing Institute
Main Description
A portrait of life inside the monolith by dissidents, activists and journalists inside China.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
Mineshaft: Warnings from China's Most Vulnerable
Rule by Terrorp. 5
A Tale of Two Crises: SARS vs. AIDSp. 13
Media Control in Chinap. 32
An Inside Viewp. 46
A Migrant Family's Accountsp. 55
Mineshaft, Our Black Homep. 61
The Age of Mammoths: Systemic Political Problems
China's Robber Baronsp. 69
Draining the Pond to Catch the Fishp. 78
Broken Flowersp. 84
"Resurrection" Exposes Confession Under Torturep. 88
Rotten Ropep. 93
The Power of a Red Rose: Protesters
June 4th and Human Rights in Chinap. 99
The Rise of Civil Society in Chinap. 109
A Tiananmen Mother Vows to Fight Onp. 123
The View Beneath the Bridgep. 132
The End of the Ropep. 139
The Power of a Red Rose (a Poetic Oration)p. 159
White Nights: Personal Reflections
Death-Row Study Sessionp. 171
The Past Is Not Another Country (An Interview with Wang Youquin)p. 175
A Migration of Soulsp. 183
Address Unknownp. 195
Someone Outside the Doorp. 211
The Shepherd's Song: Voices of the Spirit
A Mother's Storyp. 217
The Falun Gong Phenomenonp. 226
Cultural Christians and Contemporary Christianity in Chinap. 252
Art from the Latrines of the Great Northern Wildernessp. 261
An Open Letter to My Police Readersp. 264
Resource Listp. 273
About the Contributorsp. 301
Indexp. 305
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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