Catalogue


The professional ideal in the Victorian novel : the works of Disraeli, Trollope, Gaskell, and Eliot /
by Susan E. Colón.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
description
p. cm.
ISBN
1403976139 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
isbn
1403976139 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6169514
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book is a thoughtful, engaging, and exceptionally well-written analysis of the tensions between the idealist and materialist discourses of professionalism in the mid-Victorian novel. Col n demonstrates that the mid-Victorian novel is central to formulating and criticizing the conflicts within professional self-definition. Col n's insight that the formulation of professional ideology is simultaneous with self-critique and self-reform is particularly fascinating and helps us revise our histories of the professions."--Francesca Sawaya, University of Oklahoma
"This book is a thoughtful, engaging, and exceptionally well-written analysis of the tensions between the idealist and materialist discourses of professionalism in the mid-Victorian novel. Colón demonstrates that the mid-Victorian novel is central to formulating and criticizing the conflicts within professional self-definition. Colón's insight that the formulation of professional ideology is simultaneous with self-critique and self-reform is particularly fascinating and helps us revise our histories of the professions."--Francesca Sawaya, University of Oklahoma
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume examines diverse Victorian perspectives on professional issues to illuminate the dialect between materialist and idealist rationalities which informs historical professionalism.
Long Description
This book makes the claim that Victorian novels do not simply reflect professional ideology; they also scrutinize its dilemmas, contradictions, and limitations. In this volume, innovative readings of canonical texts like "Sybil, Barchester Towers, Romola, "and" Daniel Deronda" accompany groundbreaking work on less familiar texts like "Tancred "and" My Lady Ludlow" to illuminate the Victorians' own struggles with the emerging professional ideology. The Victorians' engagement with fundamental ideas of professional identity-- such as autonomy, meritocracy, and the service ethic-- reveal professionalism's dual basis in materialist and idealist rationalities.
Main Description
This book makes the claim that Victorian novels do not simply reflect professional ideology; they also scrutinize its dilemmas, contradictions, and limitations. In this volume, innovative readings of canonical texts likeSybil, Barchester Towers, Romola,andDaniel Derondaaccompany groundbreaking work on less familiar texts likeTancredandMy Lady Ludlowto illuminate the Victorians' own struggles with the emerging professional ideology. The Victorians' engagement with fundamental ideas of professional identityÂ--such as autonomy, meritocracy, and the service ethicÂ--reveal professionalism's dual basis in materialist and idealist rationalities.
Main Description
This book makes the claim that Victorian novels do not simply reflect professional ideology; they also scrutinize its dilemmas, contradictions, and limitations. In this volume, innovative readings of canonical texts like Sybil, Barchester Towers, Romola, and Daniel Deronda accompany groundbreaking work on less familiar texts like Tancred and My Lady Ludlow to illuminate the Victorians' own struggles with the emerging professional ideology. The Victorians' engagement with fundamental ideas of professional identity--such as autonomy, meritocracy, and the service ethic--reveal professionalism's dual basis in materialist and idealist rationalities.
Main Description
This book makes the claim that Victorian novels do not simply reflect professional ideology; they also scrutinize its dilemmas, contradictions, and limitations. In this volume, innovative readings of canonical texts like Sybil, Barchester Towers, Romola, and Daniel Deronda accompany groundbreaking work on less familiar texts like Tancred and My Lady Ludlow to illuminate the Victorians' own struggles with the emerging professional ideology. The Victorians' engagement with fundamental ideas of professional identity-such as autonomy, meritocracy, and the service ethic-reveal professionalism's dual basis in materialist and idealist rationalities.
Table of Contents
Cool Heads and Warm Hearts
Brains More Precious Than Blood, or the Professional Logic of the Young England Trilogy
È VeroorÈ Falso? The Pastor as Mentor in Romola
"Manly Independence": Autonomy in The Warden and Barchester Towers
"One function in particular": Specialization and the Service Ethic in "Janet's Repentance" and Daniel Deronda
Professional Frontiers in Elizabeth Gaskell's My Lady Ludlow
"A kind of manager not hitherto existing": Octavia Hill and the Professional Philanthropist
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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