Catalogue


The nineteenth-century English novel : family ideology and narrative form /
James F. Kilroy.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2007.
description
222 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1403976465 (hbk.), 9781403976468 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2007.
isbn
1403976465 (hbk.)
9781403976468 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6169513
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The subject and role of the father in the Victorian novel is certainlythecentral one for the fiction of the period, and the novels discussed are well-chosen to reveal the changing portrayal of the family and the figure of the father in the light of the political and social concerns of the period. The selection of novels is various and wide-ranging, encompassing well-known works like Goldsmith'sVicar of Wakefield, Austen'sMansfield Park, Dicken'sDombey and Son, as well lesser known works like Thackeray'sThe Newcomes, Yonge'sThe Daisy Chain, and Stevenson'sThe Master of Ballantrae.What is innovative about Kilroy's approach to the nineteenth-century English novel is his effort to refocus the reader's attention on the father and issues of patriarchy in these novels at a time in which recent scholarship of the Victorian period has been dominated by feminist readings that downplay or distort the importance of patriarchal characters."--George H. Gilpin, Professor of English and McFarlin Library Scholar-in-Residence, The University of Tulsa
" The subject and role of the father in the Victorian novel is certainly "the" central one for the fiction of the period, and the novels discussed are well-chosen to reveal the changing portrayal of the family and the figure of the father in the light of the political and social concerns of the period. The selection of novels is various and wide-ranging, encompassing well-known works like Goldsmith's "Vicar of Wakefield," Austen's "Mansfield Park," Dicken's "Dombey and Son," as well lesser known works like Thackeray's "The Newcomes," Yonge's "The Daisy Chain," and Stevenson's "The Master of Ballantrae." What is innovative about Kilroy's approach to the nineteenth-century English novel is his effort to refocus the reader's attention on the father and issues of patriarchy in these novels at a time in which recent scholarship of the Victorian period has been dominated by feminist readings that downplay or distort the importance of patriarchal characters." --George H. Gilpin, Professor of English and McFarlin Library Scholar-in-Residence, The University of Tulsa
"The subject and role of the father in the Victorian novel is certainly "the" central one for the fiction of the period, and the novels discussed are well-chosen to reveal the changing portrayal of the family and the figure of the father in the light of the political and social concerns of the period. The selection of novels is various and wide-ranging, encompassing well-known works like Goldsmith's "Vicar of Wakefield," Austen's "Mansfield Park," Dicken's "Dombey and Son," as well lesser known works like Thackeray's "The Newcomes," Yonge's "The Daisy Chain," and Stevenson's "The Master of Ballantrae." What is innovative about Kilroy's approach to the nineteenth-century English novel is his effort to refocus the reader's attention on the father and issues of patriarchy in these novels at a time in which recent scholarship of the Victorian period has been dominated by feminist readings that downplay or distort the importance of patriarchal characters."--George H. Gilpin, Professor of English and McFarlin Library Scholar-in-Residence, The University of Tulsa
"The subject and role of the father in the Victorian novel is certainly the central one for the fiction of the period, and the novels discussed are well-chosen to reveal the changing portrayal of the family and the figure of the father in the light of the political and social concerns of the period. The selection of novels is various and wide-ranging, encompassing well-known works like Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield , Austen's Mansfield Park , Dicken's Dombey and Son , as well lesser known works like Thackeray's The Newcomes , Yonge's The Daisy Chain , and Stevenson's The Master of Ballantrae. What is innovative about Kilroy's approach to the nineteenth-century English novel is his effort to refocus the reader's attention on the father and issues of patriarchy in these novels at a time in which recent scholarship of the Victorian period has been dominated by feminist readings that downplay or distort the importance of patriarchal characters."--George H. Gilpin, Professor of English and McFarlin Library Scholar-in-Residence, The University of Tulsa
Â"The subject and role of the father in the Victorian novel is certainlythecentral one for the fiction of the period, and the novels discussed are well-chosen to reveal the changing portrayal of the family and the figure of the father in the light of the political and social concerns of the period. The selection of novels is various and wide-ranging, encompassing well-known works like Goldsmith'sVicar of Wakefield, Austen'sMansfield Park, Dicken'sDombey and Son, as well lesser known works like Thackeray'sThe Newcomes, Yonge'sThe Daisy Chain, and Stevenson'sThe Master of Ballantrae.What is innovative about Kilroy's approach to the nineteenth-century English novel is his effort to refocus the reader's attention on the father and issues of patriarchy in these novels at a time in which recent scholarship of the Victorian period has been dominated by feminist readings that downplay or distort the importance of patriarchal characters.Â"--George H. Gilpin, Professor of English and McFarlin Library Scholar-in-Residence, The University of Tulsa
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Through analysis of eight English novels of the 19th century, this work explores the ways in which the novel contributes to the formation of ideology regarding the family and, conversely, the ways in which changing attitudes toward the family shape and reshape the novel.
Long Description
The novel is the literary form that most extensively informs us of nineteenth-century English culture: not its realities but the ideologies that shaped social beliefs. Fiction not only reflects ideologies; it participates in their formation and modification. But ideologies shift rapidly - more than actualities of personal or social life, making the form of the novel shift accordingly. Consideration of four pairs of English novels, each of which extensively treats the most critical issue of the period - the survival of the family - shows how changes in ideology prompted fundamental revisions of fictional techniques and structures.
Main Description
The novel is the literary form that most extensively informs us of nineteenth-century English culture: not its realities but the ideologies that shaped social beliefs. Fiction not only reflects ideologies; it participates in their formation and modification. But ideologies shift rapidly more than actualities of personal or social life, making the form of the novel shift accordingly. Consideration of four pairs of English novels, each of which extensively treats the most critical issue of the period the survival of the family shows how changes in ideology prompted fundamental revisions of fictional techniques and structures.
Main Description
The novel is the literary form that most extensively informs us of nineteenth-century English culture: not its realities but the ideologies that shaped social beliefs. Fiction not only reflects ideologies; it participates in their formation and modification. But ideologies shift rapidly Â- more than actualities of personal or social life, making the form of the novel shift accordingly. Consideration of four pairs of English novels, each of which extensively treats the most critical issue of the period Â- the survival of the family Â- shows how changes in ideology prompted fundamental revisions of fictional techniques and structures.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Protecting the Family: Mansfield Park and Lodorep. 35
A Question of Survival: Dombey and Son and The Newcomesp. 79
The Threat of Evolution: The Mill on the Floss and The Daisy Chainp. 117
The End of the Story The Master of Ballantrae and Ernest Pontifexp. 153
Notesp. 185
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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