Catalogue


Modes of faith : secular surrogates for lost religious belief /
Theodore Ziolkowski.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2007.
description
xii, 283 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226983633 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780226983639 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2007.
isbn
0226983633 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780226983639 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6163348
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-272) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-03-01:
In this wide-ranging, elegantly written book, Ziolkowski (emer., German and comparative literature, Princeton) explores the interstices of religion and culture, as he has in an impressive body of work over the past half century. Here he discusses several dozen European writers who look beyond traditional religious beliefs and ecclesiastical structures to secular ideas that, temporarily at least, are spiritually and intellectually satisfying. His inquiry opens with the manifold expressions of religious crisis in late-19th-century Europe, but his focus is on the proliferation of alternatives to religion that appear in the wake of the world-shattering experience of WW I. The heart of the book is his account of five "secular surrogates" for religious faith that attract many leading British and Continental writers and thinkers: art, India, communism, myth, and utopia. In discussing these topics, Ziolkowski centers on a few representative novels and works of nonfiction, offering sharp precis of individual works and telling comparisons that highlight his central idea. That idea is simple and not particularly new. However, Ziolkowski's breadth of reading, deft handling of disparate sources and genres, and genius for synthesis make this an exemplary work of comparative literature. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. S. Gowler Berea College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A brilliant insight into the literature of the beginnng of the 20th century."
"[ Modes of Faith ] affords vivid examples of what it can mean for a modern person to negotiate such competing claims. The rejection of inherited tradition and the unquenchable thirst for religious life combine on almost every page. . . . What counts as religion has broadened, and religiosity is shaped not just by religious traditions but also by deep human needs for transcendent meaning in a world that offers multiple ways to satisfy that need. The sesdbed for both the glories and the dreads of that fact are beautifully limned in this trenchant, accessible, and deeply compelling work of a master scholar of religions and literature."
"[Modes of Faith] affords vivid examples of what it can mean for a modern person to negotiate such competing claims. The rejection of inherited tradition and the unquenchable thirst for religious life combine on almost every page. . . . What counts as religion has broadened, and religiosity is shaped not just by religious traditions but also by deep human needs for transcendent meaning in a world that offers multiple ways to satisfy that need. The sesdbed for both the glories and the dreads of that fact are beautifully limned in this trenchant, accessible, and deeply compelling work of a master scholar of religions and literature."
"The importance of [the author's] work is how he reflects on the reaction to traditional faith in the face of a world in crisis. Readers from students to scholars will find this discussion of religious faith and literature well worth their time and reflection."
"The importance of [the author''s] work is how he reflects on the reaction to traditional faith in the face of a world in crisis. Readers from students to scholars will find this discussion of religious faith and literature well worth their time and reflection."Forrest Clingerman, Religious Studies Review
"The importance of [the author''s] work is how he reflects on the reaction to traditional faith in the face of a world in crisis. Readers from students to scholars will find this discussion of religious faith and literature well worth their time and reflection."Forrest Clingerman,Religious Studies Review
"We should be thankful . . . for this wise, learned, and beautifully written contribution to the project of literature and religion. . . . Ziolkowski has given us a deeply learned and profoundly moving book that deserves to be widely read and studied."
"We should be thankful . . . for this wise, learned, and beautifully written contribution to the project of literature and religion. . . . Ziolkowski has given us a deeply learned and profoundly moving book that deserves to be widely read and studied."David Jasper, Journal of the American Academy of Religion
"We should be thankful . . . for this wise, learned, and beautifully written contribution to the project of literature and religion. . . . Ziolkowski has given us a deeply learned and profoundly moving book that deserves to be widely read and studied."David Jasper,Journal of the American Academy of Religion
"Ziolkowski's breadth of reading, deft handling of disparate sources and genres, and genius for synthesis make this an exemplary work of comparative literature. Essential."
"Ziolkowski''s breadth of reading, deft handling of disparate sources and genres, and genius for synthesis make this an exemplary work of comparative literature. Essential." Choice
"Ziolkowski''s breadth of reading, deft handling of disparate sources and genres, and genius for synthesis make this an exemplary work of comparative literature. Essential."Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
In the decades surrounding World War I, religious belief receded in the face of radical new ideas such as Marxism, modern science, Nietzschean philosophy, and critical theology. Modes of Faith addresses both this decline of religious belief and the new modes of secular faith that took religion's place in the minds of many writers and poets. Theodore Ziolkowski here examines the motives for this embrace of the secular, locating new modes of faith in art, escapist travel, socialism, politicized myth, and utopian visions. James Joyce, he reveals, turned to art as an escape while Hermann Hesse made a pilgrimage to India in search of enlightenment. Other writers, such as Roger Martin du Gard and Thomas Mann, sought temporary solace in communism or myth. And H. G. Wells, Ziolkowski argues, took refuge in utopian dreams projected in another dimension altogether. Rooted in innovative and careful comparative reading of the work of writers from France, England, Germany, Italy, and Russia, Modes of Faith is a critical masterpiece by a distinguished literary scholar that offers an abundance of insight to anyone interested in the human compulsion to believe in forces that transcend the individual.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
The Decline of Faith
Introductionp. 3
The Melancholy, Long, Withdrawing Roarp. 9
Theologians of the Profanep. 27
New Modes of Faith
The Religion of Artp. 53
Pilgrimages to Indiap. 83
The God That Failedp. 119
The Hunger for Mythp. 147
The Longing for Utopiap. 174
Conclusion
Renewals of Spiritualityp. 213
Notesp. 239
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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