Catalogue


Sharing the dragon's teeth : terrorist groups and the exchange of new technologies /
Kim Cragin ... [et al.].
imprint
Santa Monica, CA : Rand Corporation, 2007.
description
xxii, 114 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0833039156 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
added author
imprint
Santa Monica, CA : Rand Corporation, 2007.
isbn
0833039156 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
"MG 485."
catalogue key
6162771
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 103-114).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Terrorist groups--both inside and outside the al Qaeda network--sometimes form mutually beneficial partnerships to exchange "best practices." These exchanges provide terrorist groups with the opportunity to innovate (i.e., increase their skills and expand their reach). Understanding how terrorist groups exchange technology and knowledge, therefore, is essential to ongoing and future counterterrorism strategies. This study examines how 11 terrorist groups in three areas (Mindanao, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and southwest Colombia) have attempted to exchange technologies and knowledge in an effort to reveal some of their vulnerabilities. The analysis provides the Department of Homeland Security and other national security policymakers with insight into the innovation process and suggests ways that government policies can create barriers to terroristsÂ’ adoption of new technologies.
Title Summary
"This study examines how 11 terrorist groups in three areas (Mindanao, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and southwest Colombia) have attempted to exchange technologies and knowledge in an effort to reveal some of their vulnerabilities The analysis provides the Department of Homeland Security and other national security policymakers with insight into the innovation process and suggests ways that government policies can create barriers to terrorists' adoption of new technologies."--BOOK JACKET.
Long Description
Case studies of 11 terrorist groups in Mindanao, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and southwest Colombia show how these groups have exchanged technologies and knowledge in an effort to innovate (i.e., improve their operational capabilities). The analysis provides national security policymakers with insight into the innovation process and suggests ways that government policies can create barriers to terrorists1 adoption of new technologies.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. iii
Figuresp. ix
Tablesp. xi
Summaryp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Abbreviationsp. xxi
Introductionp. 1
Understanding Terrorist Threatsp. 2
Methodology and Parametersp. 5
Monograph Structurep. 9
Organizational Theory and Terrorismp. 11
Pursuing New Technologiesp. 11
Technology Diffusionp. 11
Technology Adoptionp. 13
Absorbing New Technologies Successfullyp. 14
Characteristics of the Technologyp. 14
Characteristics of the Receiving Organizationp. 16
Characteristics of the Source Organizationp. 18
Characteristics of the Transmission Modep. 19
Conclusionsp. 21
Mindanao: A Mecca for Transnational Terrorism in Southeast Asiap. 23
Background: Islamic Militant Groups in Mindanaop. 24
Jemaah Islamiyah (JI)p. 24
Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF)p. 28
Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG)p. 30
Misuari Breakaway Group (MBG-MNLF) and the Rajah Soliaman Revolutionary Movement (RSRM)p. 32
Rationalizing the Exchange of Technology and Knowledgep. 34
JI Rationalep. 34
Filipino Islamist Rationalep. 36
Identifying Exchanges in Mindanaop. 37
Contextualizing the Exchangesp. 42
Key Judgmentsp. 44
West Bank and Gaza: Israel as the Common Enemyp. 47
Background: Militant Groups in the West Bank and Gaza Stripp. 48
Hizballahp. 49
Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigadesp. 53
Harakat Al-Muqawama Al-Islamiya (Hamas)p. 55
Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ)p. 57
Rationalizing the Exchange of Technology and Knowledgep. 58
Identifying Exchanges in the West Bank and Gazap. 59
Direct Person-to-Person Instructionp. 60
Physical Technology Exchangesp. 62
Beyond Technology Exchanges?p. 65
Contextualizing the Exchangesp. 66
Key Judgmentsp. 67
Southwest Colombia: A Safe Haven for Mutually Beneficial Exchangesp. 71
Backgroundp. 73
The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA)p. 73
The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC)p. 75
Similarities of Interest Between PIRA and FARCp. 78
Rationalizing the Exchange of Technology and Knowledgep. 79
PIRA Rationalep. 79
FARC Rationalep. 81
Identifying Exchanges in Colombia's Despejep. 83
What PIRA Shared with FARCp. 83
What FARC Shared with PIRAp. 87
Key Judgmentsp. 89
Policy Implicationsp. 93
Improving Threat Assessmentsp. 94
Disrupting Innovation Processesp. 95
Affecting Terrorists' Cost-Benefit Analysesp. 97
Conclusionp. 98
Applying the Framework to Terrorist Groupsp. 101
Selected Bibliographyp. 103
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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