Catalogue


Learning to curse : essays in early modern culture /
Stephen Greenblatt ; with a new introduction by the author.
edition
Routledge classics ed.
imprint
New York ; London : Routledge, 2007.
description
xvi, 259 p. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0415771609, 9780415771603
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York ; London : Routledge, 2007.
isbn
0415771609
9780415771603
contents note
Learning to curse: aspects of linguistic colonialism in the sixteenth century -- Marlowe, Marx, and anti-semitism -- Filthy rites -- The cultivation of anxiety: King Lear and his heirs -- Murdering peasants: status, genre, and the representation of rebellion -- Psychoanalysis and renaissance culture -- Towards a poetics of culture -- Resonance and wonder.
catalogue key
6158623
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Greenblatt writes with modest elegance, is a superb scholar and researcher, and deserves his status as the first voice in Renaissance studies today.' - Virginia Quarterly Review
'Greenblatt writes with modest elegance, is a superb scholar and researcher, and deserves his status as the first voice in Renaissance studies today.' Virginia Quarterly Review
'Greenblatt writes with modest elegance, is a superb scholar and researcher, and deserves his status as the first voice in Renaissance studies today.'- Virginia Quarterly Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of the Renaissance could only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach - 'New Historicism' - drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it. Learning to Curse charts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Back Cover Copy
Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of the Renaissancecould only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach - 'New Historicism' drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it.Learning to Curse charts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Back Cover Copy
Stephen GreenblattLearning to Cursewith a new introduction by the author"The intelligence at work in these essays is alert, imaginative and humane."The New York Review of BooksThe Renaissance was an age of both beauty and barbarism. Its extraordinary cultural flowering gave us the theatrical genius of Shakespeare, the boundless creative power of Leonardo, and the humane intelligence of Montaigne. Yet it was also a time of murderous religious intolerance, rigid class hierarchies, and a ruthless acquisitiveness raised to a fever-pitch by the encounter with the New World. Pursuing a "poetics of culture," Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of this age could only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach-new historicism-drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and, in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it. Learning to Curse charts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex, contradictory epoch.Stephen Greenblatt, the pioneer of the "new historicist" approach to literature,is currently John Cogan Professor of Humanities at Harvard University and the author of the recent bestselling life of Shakespeare, Will in the World.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Learning to Curse' charts the evolution of Stephen Greenblatt's approach to art of the Renaissance, providing a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Learning to Curse' charts the evolution of Stephen Greenblatt's approach to the literary arts of the Renaissance, providing a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Long Description
Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of the Renaissance could only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach - 'New Historicism' drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it. Learning to Curse charts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Main Description
Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of the Renaissance could only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach - 'New Historicism' - drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it. Learning to Cursecharts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Main Description
Stephen Greenblatt argued in these celebrated essays that the art of the Renaissancecould only be understood in the context of the society from which it sprang. His approach - 'New Historicism' - drew from history, anthropology, Marxist theory, post-structuralism, and psychoanalysis and in the process, blew apart the academic boundaries insulating literature from the world around it. Learning to Curse charts the evolution of that approach and provides a vivid and compelling exploration of a complex and contradictory epoch.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Learning to Curse
Marlowe, Marx and Anti-Semitism
Filthy Rites
The Cultivation of Anxiety
Murdering Peasants
Psychoanalysis and Renaissance Culture
Towards a Poetics of Culture
Resonance and Wonder
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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