Catalogue


Builders of empire : Freemasons and British imperialism, 1717-1927 /
Jessica L. Harland-Jacobs.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2007.
description
xiv, 384 p. : ill., ports.
ISBN
0807830887 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807830888 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2007.
isbn
0807830887 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807830888 (cloth : alk. paper)
local note
Galbraith, Doris.
catalogue key
6158316
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In this first study of the relationship between Freemasonry and British imperialism, Harland-Jacobs takes readers on a journey across two centuries and five continents, demonstrating that from the moment it left Britain's shores, Freemasonry proved central to the building and cohesion of the British Empire. As Freemasonry spread to Europe, the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Africa, the group's claims of cosmopolitan brotherhood were put to the test. Harland-Jacobs examines the brotherhood's role in diverse colonial settings and the impact of the empire on the brotherhood; in the process, she addresses issues of globalization, supranational identities, imperial power, fraternalism, and masculinity.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-11-01:
Thoroughly researched, richly illustrated, and clearly argued, this work makes a solid contribution to British and British Empire history, superseding the pioneering work of Paul Rich. Far from narrow, it engages in debate with leading historians such as Linda Colley and David Cannadine. Although burdened with detail, the book establishes several themes: the contribution of Freemasonry in creating British (not simply English) identity; the role of the army in making British Freemasonry global; and the tensions that Enlightenment cosmopolitanism inflicted on Freemasonry. For instance, in the 18th century, Roman Catholics joined Masonic lodges and sometimes became prominent in them, but later the order became almost exclusively Protestant in the British Isles. By the late 19th century, overseas Freemasonry admitted, sometimes reluctantly, a few nonwhites to separate and mixed-race colonial lodges. In contrast with most Masonic historians, Harland-Jacobs (Univ. of Florida) underscores the importance of the Grand Lodge of Ireland and the Irish-influenced schismatic "Ancient" Grand Lodge of England in spreading British Freemasonry throughout the empire. The author deserves thanks for her original, persuasive monograph. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. M. Fahey Miami University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Wide-ranging and penetrating." --The International History Review
"Thoroughly researched, richly illustrated, and clearly argued, this work makes a solid contribution to British and British Empire history. . . . Essential." --CHOICE
"Wide-ranging and penetrating." -- The International History Review
"Thoroughly researched, richly illustrated, and clearly argued, this work makes a solid contribution to British and British Empire history. . . . Essential." -- CHOICE
This is a significant work, richly imagined, elegantly presented, and deeply engaged with an impressive range of important issues. Steven C. Bullock, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, author of Revolutionary Brotherhood: Freemasonry and the Transformation of the American Social Order, 1730-1840
This is a significant work, richly imagined, elegantly presented, and deeply engaged with an impressive range of important issues.Steven C. Bullock, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, author ofRevolutionary Brotherhood: Freemasonry and the Transformation of the American Social Order, 1730-1840
"Brings long overdue recognition to the importance of Freemasonry to the culture of the British Empire and provides a firm foundation upon which other scholars can build." -- Journal of World History
"Brings long overdue recognition to the importance of Freemasonry to the culture of the British Empire and provides a firm foundation upon which other scholars can build." --Journal of World History
"Fascinating. . . . Supported by an amazingly rich collection of documents, impressive illustrations and diagrams. . . . The book not only tells us brilliantly the story of British imperial Freemasonry but also offers new ways to think about the global history of imperialism. . . . Provides new perspectives to our understanding the historiography of trans-national colonialism." - Acta Orientalia Vilnensia
"A significant contribution to a new imperial historiography that emphasizes the networked nature of empire, as well as the burgeoning study of imperial masculinity. . . . An invaluable point of reference for many future scholars and will open the eyes of even more to the importance of Masonic networks." --American Historical Review
"Audacious and interesting. . . . Marshals an impressive array of source material, creating a sweeping view of British Masonry over more than two centuries. . . . . It is impossible to recommend this book enough. . . . Should be required reading for anyone interested in British imperialism and Masonry in particular. . . . 'Thank you' to Professor Harland-Jacobs for this important contribution to Masonic scholarship." - International Masonic Review
"A useful addition both to British Empire studies and the growing field of Masonic studies." -- Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History
"A useful addition both to British Empire studies and the growing field of Masonic studies." --Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History
"The book's range of conceptual vision, geography, and time-span is exceptional. . . . [A] pioneering work" -- Victorian Studies
"The book's range of conceptual vision, geography, and time-span is exceptional. . . . [A] pioneering work" --Victorian Studies
"Ambitious and absorbing . . . a careful, measured accounting of the broad Imperial scope of British and Irish Masonry, based on impressively wide-ranging archival research and serious engagement with recent historiographical debates." --Journal of Modern History
"Ambitious and absorbing . . . a careful, measured accounting of the broad Imperial scope of British and Irish Masonry, based on impressively wide-ranging archival research and serious engagement with recent historiographical debates." -- Journal of Modern History
"A significant contribution to a new imperial historiography that emphasizes the networked nature of empire, as well as the burgeoning study of imperial masculinity. . . . An invaluable point of reference for many future scholars and will open the eyes of even more to the importance of Masonic networks." -- American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
They built some of the first communal structures on the empire's frontiers. The empire's most powerful proconsuls sought entrance into their lodges. Their public rituals drew dense crowds from Montreal to Madras.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Examining how the Freemasons and the British Empire transformed each other, this book addresses issues of globalization, supranational identities, imperial power, fraternalism and masculinity.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: The Ancient and Honourable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masonsp. 1
A Vast Chain Extending Round the Whole Globep. 21
In Every Climate a Homep. 64
Resolv'd against All Politics?p. 99
Our First Duty as Britonsp. 130
Men of the Best Standingp. 162
A Spirit of Universal Fraternityp. 204
Loyal Citizens of the Empirep. 240
Conclusion: The Cosmopolitan Order of the Ages?p. 282
Royal Freemasonsp. 299
Notesp. 303
Bibliographyp. 343
Indexp. 369
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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