Catalogue


Congress and the U.S.-China relationship, 1949-1979 /
Guangqiu Xu.
imprint
Akron, OH : University of Akron Press, 2007.
description
xi, 409 p. : maps.
ISBN
193196839X (cloth : alk. paper), 9781931968393 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Akron, OH : University of Akron Press, 2007.
isbn
193196839X (cloth : alk. paper)
9781931968393 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6146630
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 367-401) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr. Guangqiu Xu received his bachelor's degree in Chinese history and his master's degree in modern Chinese history from Sun Yat-sen University. He received his doctoral degree in U.S. history from the University of Maryland, College Park. His first book, War Wings: The United States and Chinese Military Aviation, 1929-1949, was published in 2001. In addition, he has published many articles in journals such as Modern Asian Studies, Journal of Contemporary History, and Asian Survey. Dr. Xu has taught at Friends University in Kansas since August of 2002.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-04-01:
Xu (Friends Univ.) attempts to correct for the imbalance in the literature regarding the role Congress played in making US policy toward China from 1949 to 1979. Xu breaks the era into five parts: (1) 1949-51 (establishment of the People's Republic and start of the Korean War); (2) 1950-52, the McCarthy era in US politics; (3) 1953-63, Taiwan Strait crises; (4) 1964-72, evolution of rapprochement; and (5) 1972-79, normalization of US-China relations. By using Chinese as well as English-language sources, Xu finds many instances of congressional influence, but he stretches to do so. The literature since the 1990s has accorded Congress influence; see, for example, Harding's A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China since 1972 (CH, Jul'92, 29-6537). In general, Xu finds that the role of Congress was limited in emergencies such as the Korean War, but it was an important actor in the development of what Xu calls "strategic" policies--China's admission to the United Nations, the defense of Taiwan, and trade embargo policy. In these cases Congress (apart from the presidency) did influence China's domestic and international behavior Summing Up: Recommended. All undergraduate collections. G. A. McBeath University of Alaska Fairbanks
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal,
Choice, April 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
Guangqiu Xu, a native of China fluent in both Mandarin and Cantonese, has written an exhaustive study of United States-China relations during the Cold War, with a special focus on the role of the U.S. Congress in influencing Sino-American policy. Based upon extensive archival research in Chinese and American sources, Professor Xu's book is comprehensive and original. It is a detailed account of the interactions between Congress and the White House as the United States forged its policies regarding the world's most populous nation. Covering the period from the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949 to the United States' recognition of the PRC in 1979, this study shows how Congress became a key factor in the formulation and conduct of China policy. No other book examines so fully the legislative-executive struggles and compromises during this thirty-year period, from the postwar maneuverings of Truman to Nixon's surprising visit to Beijing. Especially important is Professor Xu's use of Chinese source material to discuss China's reaction and response to American policy decisions. Congress and the U.S.-China Relationship, 1949-1979 examines a familiar story from a fresh perspective, putting into a new context the forces at play in determining how the United States and China responded to each other during the chilliest years of the Cold War. With his emphasis on Congress, Professor Xu has opened up the history of the period to an analysis of how legislative power, direct and indirect, can affect foreign policy and change the course of world events.
Main Description
Guangqiu Xu, a native of China fluent in both Mandarin and Cantonese, has written an exhaustive study of United States-China relations during the cold war, with a special focus on the role of the U.S. Congress in influencing Sino-American policy. Based upon extensive archival research in Chinese and American sources, Professor Xu's book is a detailed account of the interactions between Congress and the White House as the United States forged its policies regarding the world's most populous nation. Covering the period from the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949 to the United States' recognition of the PRC in 1979, this study shows how Congress became a key factor in the formulation and conduct of China policy. Especially important is Professor Xu's use of Chinese source material to discuss China's reaction and response to American policy decisions. With his emphasis on Congress, Professor Xu has opened up the history of the period to an analysis of how legislative power, direct and indirect, can affect foreign policy and change the course of world events.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Note on Transliterationp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Congressional Influence on China Policy and the CCP's Reaction, 1949-1951p. 15
Congressional China Inquests and the McCarran Act, 1950-1952p. 79
Congressional China Policy and the Issue of Taiwan, 1953-1963p. 113
Congress's Role in U.S.-China Rapprochement, 1964-1972p. 180
Congress's Role in U.S.-China Relations, 1972-1979p. 242
Conclusionp. 295
Appendixp. 303
Notesp. 309
Bibliographyp. 367
Indexp. 403
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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