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In defense of the Bush doctrine /
Robert G. Kaufman.
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2007.
description
ix, 251 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813124344 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780813124346 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2007.
isbn
0813124344 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780813124346 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6142939
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-240) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-11-01:
Kaufman's book is true to its name. Kaufman (public policy, Pepperdine Univ.; adjunct scholar, Heritage Foundation) writes that "no amount of gentle persuasion can defend American values against such enemies (al-Qaeda, rogue states, or anti-American regimes) without the robustness of American power and the willingness to use it, with as broad a coalition possible that fits the mission." Consequently, US foreign policy must be based on two pillars: preemption against threats emanating from terrorist groups and nondeterrable states, and promotion of capitalist democracy to eliminate cultures of tyranny and corruption that give rise to fanaticism and despotism. Throughout the book, the author makes a strong case for an aggressive US foreign policy and directly addresses other approaches to grand strategy, which guides a country's foreign policy. His critiques are useful and thought-provoking, but he uncritically accepts that the US is currently involved in World War IV. Given the administration's foreign policy orientation, however, Kaufman does provide an excellent explanation of the underlying tenets of Bush foreign policy, and he provides a framework to assess whether or not the world, or just US foreign policy, really changed after September 2001. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and higher. D. S. Reveron Naval War College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2007-04-01:
The best part of Kaufman's book is his critical analysis of alternatives, in U.S. grand strategy, to the Bush doctrine, whose "moral democratic realism" entails the prudent application of American power to replace dangerous regimes in the Middle East. Kaufman (public policy, Pepperdine Univ.; Henry M. Jackson: A Life in Politics) reviews a continuum of alternatives, from isolationism, as advocated today by Pat Buchanan; to neorealism, supported by academics such as John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt; to classical realism, whose proponents include Brent Scowcroft and Lawrence Eagleberger; to the liberal multilateralism of "John Kerry and virtually every Democratic presidential nominee since 1968." When the book went to press last October, Kaufman judged current war casualties historically acceptable, in light, for example, of our 4000 dead in the Philippines after the Spanish American War, and he saw George Bush as heir to Ronald Reagan, whose application of moral democratic realism won the Cold War. He has since written an epilog and turned critical of the administration while concluding, "I have not yet lost hope that the President will remain faithful to the Bush Doctrine." Obviously, the jury is still out on both the president and the doctrine. Only for large political science collections.-Bob Nardini, Concord, NH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
""An important book about the central issue of our time" -- Senator Joe Lieberman
""An important book about the central issue of our time--the struggle against Islamist extremism. Kaufman understands this fight, and has made an effective case for the imperative of taking bold action to defeat this threat to our security and the ideals we cherish."" -- Senator Joe Lieberman
""A very interesting book, based on a fresh concept of 'moral democratic realism,' that distinguishes Kaufman's work from that of Charles Krauthammer, William Kristol, Robert Kagan, Francis Fukuyama, and others. A helpful and clarifying book."" -- Michael Novak, coauthor of Washington's God and author of The Spirit of Democ
""In this excellent new book, Kaufman describes the Bush approach to foreign policy as the latest example of what he calls moral democratic realism, an approach he attributes to FDR, Truman, and Reagan as well."" -- National Review
Kaufman is passionate without being polemical, and is quite evenhanded, consistently pointing out arguments and examples that disagree with his point of view. This is a provocative book written by a first-rate mind.
"Kaufman is passionate without being polemical, and is quite evenhanded, consistently pointing out arguments and examples that disagree with his point of view. This is a provocative book written by a first-rate mind." -- John Robert Greene, Historian
""Kaufman offers a much needed, well-reasoned defense of the present Bush doctrine in the Middle East. As Kaufman shows, for all the heartbreak in our present efforts in Iraq, ultimately it remains the best practical and moral course to foster some third way other than either autocracy or theocracy--precisely the reason why al Qaeda must stop our efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq before reform takes hold. A much needed corrective to much of the contemporary hysteria of the hour.">" -- Victor Davis Hanson, author of A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spart
""Kaufman offers a much needed, well-reasoned defense of the present Bush doctrine in the Middle East. As Kaufman shows, for all the heartbreak in our present efforts in Iraq, ultimately it remains the best practical and moral course to foster some third way other than either autocracy or theocracy" -- Victor Davis Hanson, author of A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spart
""Kaufman presents a thoughtful, comprehensive case. It ranks as the most histocially powerful support of Mr. Bush and his doctrine, including the Iraq war."" -- Washington Times
""Kaufman's fine book is required reading for thoughtful candidates and citizens alike."" -- George Weigel, Catholic Exchange
""President Bush could use an unapologetic argument for his foreign policy these days, and this is it...[Kaufmann] makes a persuasive case."" -- The Weekly Standard
""Robert Kaufman's short and provocative book provides and interesting and timely defense of what is perhaps become one of the most contentious concepts in international politics."" -- Andrew J. Futter, University of Birmingham, Political Studies Review
""The author has compiled, better than anywhere else that I have seen, a systematic explanation of the Bush Doctrine and its moral and historical foundations."" -- Modern Age, Ted V. McAllister
""The best part of Kaufman's book is his critical analysis of alternatives, in U.S. grand strategy, to the Bush doctrine, whose moral democratic realism entails the prudent application of American power to replace dangerous regimes in the Middle East."" -- Library Journal (starred review)
""This is a very well-grounded defense of the Bush Doctrine. It is scholarly and political in the best sense of both terms. Those who disagree (as I do) will be challenged and informed."" -- Robert Jervis, author of American Foreign Policy in a New Era
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2007
Choice, November 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Robert Kaufman offers an arguement for the principles of moral democratic realism that inspired the Bush administration's policy of regime change in Iraq. This text connects the Bush Doctrine and modern issues in American foreign policy to the deeper tradition of American diplomacy.
Main Description
In Defense of the Bush Doctrine offers a vigorous argument for the principles of moral democratic realism that inspired the Bush administration's policy of regime change in Iraq.
Main Description
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, shattered the prevalent optimism in the United States that had blossomed during the tranquil and prosperous 1990s, when democracy seemed triumphant and catastrophic wars were a relic of the past.President George W. Bush responded with a bold and controversial grand strategy for waging a preemptive Global War on Terror, which has ignited passionate debate about the purposes of American power and the nation's proper role in the world. In Defense of the Bush Doctrine offers a vigorous argument for the principles of moral democratic realism that inspired the Bush administration's policy of regime change in Iraq. The Bush Doctrine rests on two main pillars -- the inadequacy of deterrence and containment strategies when dealing with terrorists and rogue regimes, and the culture of tyranny in the Middle East, which spawns aggressive secular and religious despotisms. Two key premises shape Kaufman's case for the Bush Doctrine's conformity with moral democratic realism. The first is the fundamental purpose of American foreign policy since its inception: to ensure the integrity and vitality of a free society "founded upon the dignity and worth of the individual." The second premise is that the cardinal virtue of prudence (the right reason about things to be done) must be the standard for determining the best practicable American grand strategy. In Defense of the Bush Doctrine provides a broader historical context for the post--September 11 American foreign policy that will transform world politics well into the future. Kaufman connects the Bush Doctrine and current issues in American foreign policy, such as how the U.S. should deal with China, to the deeper tradition of American diplomacy. Drawing from positive lessons as well as cautionary tales from the past, Kaufman concludes that moral democratic realism offers the most compelling framework for American grand strategy, as it expands the democratic zone of peace and minimizes the number and gravity of threats the United States faces in the modern world.
Unpaid Annotation
Kaufman offers his argument for the principles of moral democratic realism that underlie the Bush administration’s strategies in the Global War on Terror and current issues in American foreign policy post-September 11.
Table of Contents
The imprudence of isolationismp. 5
The perils of neorealismp. 23
The unrealistic realism of classical realistsp. 51
The perils of liberal multilateralismp. 63
Moral democratic realismp. 87
Moral democratic realism and the endgame of the Cold Warp. 101
The Bush doctrine and Iraq : a sound application of a sound doctrinep. 125
Conclusion : beyond the war on terrorp. 143
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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