Catalogue


Koizumi diplomacy : Japan's kantei approach to foreign and defense affairs /
Tomohito Shinoda.
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2007.
description
xvii, 197 p.
ISBN
0295986999 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780295986999 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2007.
isbn
0295986999 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780295986999 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6142786
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-190) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tomohito Shinoda is associate professor of international relations at the International University of Japan.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Tomohito Shinoda analyzes Japan's Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's role in policymaking, focusing on the assistance he receives from the Kantei, or Cabinet Secretariat, the Japanese equivalent of the American president's White House cabinet. Through case studies and personal interviews, Tomohito Shinoda looks at how Koizumi's new system operates on a practical level.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-09-01:
Shinoda (International Univ. of Japan) examines selected aspects of the foreign policy of the Koizumi administration (2001-2006). Using Hilsman's model of concentric circles of influence, he traces the passage and implementation of anti-terrorism and peacekeeping legislation. The relatively rapid pace and general form of legislative action is attributed in part to international events, internal party alignments, external pressure, and the changing perspectives of the Japanese public and media. No less important is the personal popularity of Prime Minister Koizumi. Still, Shinoda argues that a full understanding of recent Japanese foreign policy must include an examination of the administrative reforms of the late 1990s, which significantly strengthened the role of the Prime Minister's Office in the foreign policy making process. The enhanced position and influence of the Cabinet's Secretariat is highlighted in this regard. The author's work thus provides new insight into the inner workings of the Prime Minister's Office, the leadership style of Koizumi, intra- and inter-party relationships, and important changes in the foreign policy and international role of Japan. The work assumes some knowledge of Japanese domestic politics, but is written in a style that allows even the general reader to gain a deeper understanding of Japanese politics. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. J. M. Peek Lyon College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2007
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Summaries
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Long Description
Japan's policymaking strategy in foreign and defense affairs changed dramatically in 2001 after Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi took the helm of the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party. Following a series of bland and short-lived prime ministers, Koizumi's infusion of fresh energy into a tired and opaque party has been compared with Tony Blair's successful revamping of New Labour in the U.K. Koizumi, however, had a weak power base in the party and limited diplomatic experience. How, then, was he able to exercise leadership? Tomohito Shinoda analyzes the prime minister's role in policymaking, focusing on the assistance he receives from the Kantei, or Cabinet Secretariat, the Japanese equivalent of the American president's White House cabinet. Since 2001, the Japanese government's center of gravity for foreign policy has shifted from the traditionally dominant Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Kantei, which allowed Koizumi to exercise a top-down style of decision making. Following another decisive win in the election of 2005, he took an even more assertive leadership role in Asian diplomacy. Through case studies and personal interviews with former prime ministers and cabinet secretaries, Shinoda looks at how Koizumi's new system operates on a practical level - how, for example, major post-2001 anti-terrorism legislation has been initiated and prepared by the Kantei-and compares its successes and failures with those of the U.S. system. With frank and engaging commentary by former officials, this book makes a unique contribution to the understanding of contemporary Japanese political affairs.
Main Description
Japan's policymaking strategy in foreign and defence affairs changed dramatically in 2001 after Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi took the helm of the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party. Following a series of bland and short-lived prime ministers, Koizumi's infusion of fresh energy into a tired and opaque party has been compared with Tony Blair's successful revamping of New Labour in the U.K. Koizumi, however, had a weak power base in the party and limited diplomatic experience. How, then, was he able to exercise leadership? Tomohito Shinoda analyzes the prime minister's role in policymaking, focusing on the assistance he receives from the Kantei, or Cabinet Secretariat, the Japanese equivalent of the American president's White House cabinet. Since 2001, the Japanese government's centre of gravity for foreign policy has shifted from the traditionally dominant Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Kantei, which allowed Koizumi to exercise a top-down style of decision making. Following another decisive win in the election of 2005, he took an even more assertive leadership role in Asian diplomacy. Through case studies and personal interviews with former prime ministers and cabinet secretaries, Shinoda looks at how Koizumi's new system operates on a practical level - how, for example, major post-2001 anti-terrorism legislation has been initiated and prepared by the Kantei-and compares its successes and failures with those of the U.S. system. With frank and engaging commentary by former officials, this book makes a unique contribution to the understanding of contemporary Japanese political affairs.
Main Description
Japan's policymaking strategy in foreign and defense affairs changed dramatically in 2001 after Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi took the helm of the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party. Following a series of bland and short-lived prime ministers, Koizumi's infusion of fresh energy into a tired and opaque party has been compared with Tony Blair's successful revamping of New Labour in the U.K. Koizumi, however, had a weak power base in the party and limited diplomatic experience. How, then, was he able to exercise leadership? Tomohito Shinoda analyzes the prime minister's role in policymaking, focusing on the assistance he receives from the Kantei, or Cabinet Secretariat, the Japanese equivalent of the American president's White House cabinet. Since 2001, the Japanese government's center of gravity for foreign policy has shifted from the traditionally dominant Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Kantei, which allowed Koizumi to exercise a top-down style of decision-making. Through case studies and personal interviews with former prime ministers and cabinet secretaries, Shinoda looks at how Koizumi's new system operates on a practical level - how, for example, major post-2001 anti-terrorism legislation has been initiated and prepared by the Kantei-and compares its successes and failures with those of the U.S. system. With frank and engaging commentary by former officials, this book makes a unique contribution to the understanding of contemporary Japanese political affairs. Tomohito Shinoda is professor of international relations at the International University of Japan.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
A Note on Conventionsp. xiii
Abbreviations and Japanese Termsp. xv
Introductionp. 3
The Roots of Kantei Diplomacyp. 18
A Traumatic Experience: From the Gulf Crisis to the International Peace Cooperation Legislationp. 50
The Rise of the Kanteip. 63
Koizumi's Response to Terrorism: The 2001 Anti-Terrorism Legislationp. 86
Preparing for a National Contingency: The 2003 Emergency Legislationp. 99
Dispatching the SDF to Reconstruct Iraq: The 2003 Iraq Special Measures Legislationp. 113
Evaluating Kantei Diplomacyp. 133
Notesp. 155
Bibliographyp. 171
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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