Catalogue


"Lord, giver of life" : toward a pneumatological complement to George Lindbeck's theory of doctrine /
Jane Barter Moulaison.
imprint
[Waterloo, Ont.] : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2007.
description
xii, 168 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0889205019, 9780889205017
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
[Waterloo, Ont.] : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2007.
isbn
0889205019
9780889205017
catalogue key
6141328
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Wilson, Joyce M. 2008/07/17.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 153-162) and index.
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
George Lindbeck once characterized postliberalism, which received its initial structure from his book The Nature of Doctrine, as an attempt to recover pre-modern scriptural interpretation in contemporary form. In Lord, Giver of Life: Toward a Pneumatological Complement to George Lindbeck's Theory of Doctrine, Jane Barter Moulaison explores the success of that effort through a close examination of Lindbeck's own theological contributions. Taking seriously the ecumenical promises of Lindbeck's writing (he was instrumental in advancing Lutheran and Roman Catholic dialogue throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s), this book brings Lindbeck's famous cultural-linguistic model of religion into dialogue with Christianity's theological forbearers: specifically, the Eastern progenitors of orthodox confession.
Main Description
George Lindbeck once characterized postliberalism, which received its initial structure from his book The Nature of Doctrine, as an attempt to recover pre-modern scriptural interpretation in contemporary form. In Lord, Giver of Life: Toward a Pneumatological Complement to George Lindbeck's Theory of Doctrine, Jane Barter Moulaison explores the success of that effort through a close examination of Lindbeck's own theological contributions. Taking seriously the ecumenical promises of Lindbeck's writing (he was instrumental in advancing Lutheran and Roman Catholic dialogue throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s), this book brings Lindbeck's famous cultural-linguistic model of religion into dialogue with Christianity's theological forbearers: specifically, the Eastern progenitors of orthodox confession.This constellation of theological voices-Lindbeck, his supporters and detractors, along with patristic theologians-is meant not only to test the viability of a religious model but, more importantly, to advance Lindbeck's project in ways that have not yet been pursued. Among the critical questions engaged are: to what degree can the excesses of modern theology be overcome by a return to premodern sources? What are the implications of a constructive pneumatology to the cultural-linguistic model? Does this complement address the critiques of postliberalism, particularly those that consider the role of human agency, rationality, and autonomy?While Lindbeck recovers significant and forgotten elements of pre-modern biblical interpretation, the very formalism of his project sometimes obscures the theological underpinnings of premodern insights and practices. Through specific attention to Eastern Trinitarian theologies of the fourth century, this book exposes a rather persistent oversight within Lindbeck's recovery: namely, that alongside the regulative function of canon and doctrine, early biblical interpretation recognizes the role of the Holy Spirit in the appropriation of scripture, in the mission of the church, and in the defence of the gospel within the context of an unbelieving world. This book attends to these insights from the early churchs doctrine of the Holy Spirit in appreciative service to the cultural-linguistic model of religion.
Main Description
George Lindbeck once characterized postliberalism, which received its initial structure from his book The Nature of Doctrine, as an attempt to recover pre-modern scriptural interpretation in contemporary form. In Lord, Giver of Life: Toward a Pneumatological Complement to George Lindbeck's Theory of Doctrine, Jane Barter Moulaison explores the success of that effort through a close examination of Lindbeck's own theological contributions. Taking seriously the ecumenical promises of Lindbeck's writing (he was instrumental in advancing Lutheran and Roman Catholic dialogue throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s), this book brings Lindbeck's famous cultural-linguistic model of religion into dialogue with Christianity's theological forbearers: specifically, the Eastern progenitors of orthodox confession. This constellation of theological voices-Lindbeck, his supporters and detractors, along with patristic theologians-is meant not only to test the viability of a religious model but, more importantly, to advance Lindbeck's project in ways that have not yet been pursued. Among the critical questions engaged are: to what degree can the excesses of modern theology be overcome by a return to premodern sources? What are the implications of a constructive pneumatology to the cultural-linguistic model? Does this complement address the critiques of postliberalism, particularly those that consider the role of human agency, rationality, and autonomy? While Lindbeck recovers significant and forgotten elements of pre-modern biblical interpretation, the very formalism of his project sometimes obscures the theological underpinnings of premodern insights and practices. Through specific attention to Eastern Trinitarian theologies of the fourth century, this book exposes a rather persistent oversight within Lindbeck's recovery: namely, that alongside the regulative function of canon and doctrine, early biblical interpretation recognizes the role of the Holy Spirit in the appropriation of scripture, in the mission of the church, and in the defence of the gospel within the context of an unbelieving world. This book attends to these insights from the early churchs doctrine of the Holy Spirit in appreciative service to the cultural-linguistic model of religion.
Main Description
George Lindbeck once characterised post-liberalism, which received its initial structure from his book The Nature of Doctrine, as an attempt to recover pre-modern scriptural interpretation in contemporary form. In this book, Jane Barter Moulaison explores the success of that effort through a close examination of Lindbeck's own theological contributions. Taking seriously the ecumenical promises of Lindbeck's writing (he was instrumental in advancing Lutheran and Roman Catholic dialogue throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s), this book brings Lindbeck's famous cultural-linguistic model of religion into dialogue with Christianity's theological forbears: specifically, the Eastern progenitors of orthodox confession. This constellation of theological voices -- Lindbeck, his supporters and detractors, along with patristic theologians -- is meant not only to test the viability of a religious model but, more importantly, to advance Lindbeck's project in ways that have not yet been pursued. Among the critical questions engaged are: to what degree can the excesses of modern theology be overcome by a return to pre-modern sources? What are the implications of a constructive pneumatology to the cultural-linguistic model? Does this complement address the critiques of post-liberalism, particularly those that consider the role of human agency, rationality, and autonomy? While Lindbeck recovers significant and forgotten elements of pre-modern biblical interpretation, the very formalism of his project sometimes obscures the theological underpinnings of pre-modern insights and practices. Through specific attention to Eastern Trinitarian theologies of the fourth century, this book exposes a rather persistent oversight within Lindbeck's recovery: namely, that alongside the regulative function of canon and doctrine, early biblical interpretation recognises the role of the Holy Spirit in the appropriation of scripture, in the mission of the church, and in the defence of the gospel within the context of an unbelieving world. This book attends to these insights from the early churchs doctrine of the Holy Spirit in appreciative service to the cultural-linguistic model of religion.
Main Description
George Lindbeck once characterised post-liberalism, which received its initial structure from his book "The Nature of Doctrine", as an attempt to recover pre-modern scriptural interpretation in contemporary form. In this book, Jane Barter Moulaison explores the success of that effort through a close examination of Lindbeck's own theological contributions. Taking seriously the ecumenical promises of Lindbeck's writing (he was instrumental in advancing Lutheran and Roman Catholic dialogue throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s), this book brings Lindbeck's famous cultural-linguistic model of religion into dialogue with Christianity's theological forbears: specifically, the Eastern progenitors of orthodox confession. This constellation of theological voices -- Lindbeck, his supporters and detractors, along with patristic theologians -- is meant not only to test the viability of a religious model but, more importantly, to advance Lindbeck's project in ways that have not yet been pursued. Among the critical questions engaged are: to what degree can the excesses of modern theology be overcome by a return to pre-modern sources? What are the implications of a constructive pneumatology to the cultural-linguistic model? Does this complement address the critiques of post-liberalism, particularly those that consider the role of human agency, rationality, and autonomy? While Lindbeck recovers significant and forgotten elements of pre-modern biblical interpretation, the very formalism of his project sometimes obscures the theological underpinnings of pre-modern insights and practices. Through specific attention to Eastern Trinitarian theologies of the fourth century, this book exposes a rather persistent oversight within Lindbeck's recovery: namely, that alongside the regulative function of canon and doctrine, early biblical interpretation recognises the role of the Holy Spirit in the appropriation of scripture, in the mission of the church, and in the defence of the gospel within the context of an unbelieving world. This book attends to these insights from the early churchs doctrine of the Holy Spirit in appreciative service to the cultural-linguistic model of religion.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Bringing Lindbeck's cultural-linguistic model of religion into dialogue with Christianity's theological forbears: specifically the Eastern progenitors of orthodox confession, this book exposes an oversight within Lindbeck's recovery through specific attention to Eastern Trinitarian theologies of the 4th century.
Table of Contents
The Spirit Who Saves
The Spirit and Language
The Spirit and Truth
The Spirit's Address
Life in the Spirit
Staying with Us
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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