Catalogue


Misfortunes of war : press and public reactions to civilian deaths in wartime /
Eric V. Larson, Bogdan Savych.
imprint
Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2007.
description
xxix, 263 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0833038974 (pbk.), 9780833038975 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2007.
isbn
0833038974 (pbk.)
9780833038975 (pbk.)
contents note
Introduction. Literature review -- Approach -- Organization of this monograph -- Operation Desert Storm (Iraq, 1991). Civilian casualty estimates -- Handling of the civilian casualties issue -- The arc of media and public concern -- The Al Firdos Bunker incident -- Key lessons -- Operation Allied Force (Kosovo, 1999) -- Civilian casualty estimates -- Handling of the civilian casualties issue -- The arc of media and public concern -- The 14 April convoy attacks outside Djakovica -- The May 7 Chinese Embassy Bombing -- Conclusions -- 4. Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan, 2001-) -- Civilian casualty estimates -- Handling of the civilian casualties issue -- The arc of media and public concern -- The Wedding Party incident -- Key lessons -- Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq, 2003-) -- Civilian casualty estimates -- Handling of the civilian casualties issue -- The arc of nedia and public concern -- The Marketplace incident -- Key lessons -- Implications and conclusions -- The Military: a highly credible institution -- Recommendations.
general note
"Aerospace Force Development Program of RAND Project AIR FORCE."
catalogue key
6140221
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-10-01:
The authors address how the US press and public react to civilian deaths during war, arguing that the public is more realistic about casualties during war than conventional wisdom may suggest. Larson and Savych suggest that what matters most for public support of military actions is whether the public and press believe that the military is doing all it can to minimize civilian casualties. Published by RAND, Project Air Force, the work is a policy report meant to inform the military. After a valuable literature review, the authors present the cases of Operation Desert Storm (Iraq, 1991), Operation Allied Force (Kosovo, 1999), Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan, 2001- ), and Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq, 2003- ). The strongest sections of each case study are those that deal with US media coverage of civilian casualties. The weakest, by far, are the sections on foreign media coverage and foreign public opinion. Here the authors are significantly constrained by a lack of appropriate data. Also presented are policy recommendations for the military that suggest ways to respond to civilian casualties, including the need for timely, accurate information. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels. L. J. Roselle Elon University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
In January 2004, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security inaugurated a new system for tracking foreign visitors at Ports of entry to the United States, the United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program. Building on previous RAND research and a case study of similar requirements in France in The 1980s and 1990s, this paper discusses policy issues raised by US-VISIT, including its effects on national security, privacy, and trade and tourism.
Unpaid Annotation
This monograph, part of a larger study of ways to reduce collateral damage undertaken for the U.S. Air Force, analyzes press, public, and leadership reactions to civilian casualty incidents and how these incidents affect media reporting or public support for military operations. It analyzes U.S. and foreign media and public responses to the 1991 Al Firdos bunker bombing, the 1999 Djakovica convoy and Chinese embassy attacks, the 2002 Afghan wedding party attack, and the 2003 Baghdad marketplace explosion.
Main Description
In January 2004, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security inaugurated a new system for tracking foreign visitors at Ports of entry to the United States, the United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program. Building on previous RAND research and a case study of similar requirements in France in The 1980s and 1990s, this paper discusses policy issues raised by US-VISIT,including its effects on national security, privacy, and trade and tourism.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Operation Desert Storm (Iraq, 1991)p. 21
Operation Allied Force (Kosovo, 1999)p. 63
Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan, 2001-)p. 125
Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq, 2003-)p. 159
Implications and conclusionsp. 205
Multivariate statistical modeling resultsp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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