Catalogue


Not your usual founding father : selected readings from Benjamin Franklin /
edited by Edmund S. Morgan.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2006.
description
xiv, 303 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0300113943 (alk. paper), 9780300113945 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2006.
isbn
0300113943 (alk. paper)
9780300113945 (alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
6138329
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2006-12-01:
Morgan (history, emeritus, Yale; Benjamin Franklin), the author of a long shelf of books on Colonial and revolutionary America, is not your usual academic historian. Similarly, this book is not your usual collection of writings by a famous man. Morgan does not include some of the most famous of Benjamin Franklin's compositions; the Autobiography, e.g., is absent here. Instead, he has expertly chosen letters and other items that best reveal the inner Franklin. The book's four sections cover Franklin the man as his contemporaries knew him, Franklin the curious scientist and inventor, Franklin the patriot in the American Revolution, and Franklin the diplomat and visionary. Morgan's witty and insightful introductions to each section are a match for Franklin's own masterful way with words. He manages to combine scholarly erudition with humor and stylistic grace, making this book a sheer delight. Highly recommended for all public libraries.-Thomas J. Schaeper, St. Bonaventure Univ., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fine collection, greatly enhanced by Morgan''s sprightly and readable introductions."Gordon S. Wood, Brown University
"A fine collection, greatly enhanced by Morgan's sprightly and readable introductions."-Gordon S. Wood, Brown University
"A fine collection, greatly enhanced by Morgan's sprightly and readable introductions."�Gordon S. Wood, Brown University
"Edmund Morgan, the most distinguished of Benjamin Franklin''s scholars and fans, has put together a glorious compendium of his writings that reminds us how delightful and witty he was. You will be mesmerizedand find out what that word really means!"Walter Isaacson, author ofBenjamin Franklin: An American Life
"Edmund Morgan, the most distinguished of Benjamin Franklin''s scholars and fans, has put together a glorious compendium of his writings that reminds us how delightful and witty he was. You will be mesmerizedand find out what that word really means!"Walter Isaacson, author of Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
"Edmund Morgan, the most distinguished of Benjamin Franklin's scholars and fans, has put together a glorious compendium of his writings that reminds us how delightful and witty he was. You will be mesmerized�and find out what that word really means!"�Walter Isaacson, author of Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
"Of all the truly great American historians, Edmund S. Morgan comes closest to capturing the spirit of Benjamin Franklin''s prose in his own work: enlightening, plain, witty, democratic, cosmopolitan, and crafty in the best sense of the word. Here he arranges an expert''s tour through Franklin''s writings, offering readers a continual Christmas."Sean Wilentz, author ofThe Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln
"Of all the truly great American historians, Edmund S. Morgan comes closest to capturing the spirit of Benjamin Franklin's prose in his own work: enlightening, plain, witty, democratic, cosmopolitan, and crafty in the best sense of the word. Here he arranges an expert's tour through Franklin 's writings, offering readers a continual Christmas."-Sean Wilentz, author of The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln
"Of all the truly great American historians, Edmund S. Morgan comes closest to capturing the spirit of Benjamin Franklin''s prose in his own work: enlightening, plain, witty, democratic, cosmopolitan, and crafty in the best sense of the word. Here he arranges an expert''s tour through Franklin''s writings, offering readers a continual Christmas."Sean Wilentz, author of The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln
�Of all the truly great American historians, Edmund S. Morgan comes closest to capturing the spirit of Benjamin Franklin's prose in his own work: enlightening, plain, witty, democratic, cosmopolitan, and crafty in the best sense of the word. Here he arranges an expert's tour through Franklin's writings, offering readers a continual Christmas.��Sean Wilentz, author of The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln
"What James Boswell did for Samuel Johnson, Edmund Morgan has now done for Benjamin Franklin, here allowing us into a conversation that brings the great man to life in all his Protean splendor."-Joseph J. Ellis, author of Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation
"What James Boswell did for Samuel Johnson, Edmund Morgan has now done for Benjamin Franklin, here allowing us into a conversation that brings the great man to life in all his Protean splendor."Joseph J. Ellis, author ofFounding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation
"What James Boswell did for Samuel Johnson, Edmund Morgan has now done for Benjamin Franklin, here allowing us into a conversation that brings the great man to life in all his Protean splendor."Joseph J. Ellis, author of Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation
�What James Boswell did for Samuel Johnson, Edmund Morgan has now done for Benjamin Franklin, here allowing us into a conversation that brings the great man to life in all his Protean splendor.��Joseph J. Ellis, author of Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, November 2006
Library Journal, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Revealing Benjamin Franklin's human side, his tastes and habits, his enthusiasms, and his devotion to democracy and the people of the US, this book is organised around three major themes, each with an introduction. It is devoted to his inexhaustible intellectual energy and his scientific discoveries.
Main Description
This engaging book reveals Benjamin Franklin's human side--his tastes and habits, his enthusiasms, and his devotion to democracy and the people of the United States.
Main Description
This engaging book reveals Benjamin Franklin's human sidehis tastes and habits, his enthusiasms, and his devotion to democracy and the people of the United States. Three hundred years after his birth, we may remember Franklin's famousAutobiography, or his status as framer of the Declaration of Independence and the peace with Great Britain, or his experiments in electricity, or perhaps his sage advice on diligence and thrift. But historian Edmund S. Morgan invites us to meet the man himself, a sociable, good-natured, and extraordinary human being with boundless curiosity about the natural world and a vision of what America could be. Drawing on lifelong research in the vast Franklin archives, Morgan assembles both famous and lesser-known writings that offer insights into this founding father's thinking. The book is organized around four major themes, each with an introduction. The first section includes journal excerpts and letters revealing Franklin's personal tastes and habits. The second is devoted to Franklin's inexhaustible intellectual energy and his scientific discoveries. The third and fourth chronicle his devotion to serving the people who became the United States both before and after the Revolution and to advancing his democratic vision of their future. Franklin's humanity and genius have never seemed more real than in the pages of this appealing anthology.
Main Description
This engaging book reveals Benjamin Franklin's human side--his tastes and habits, his enthusiasms, and his devotion to democracy and the people of the United States. Three hundred years after his birth, we may remember Franklin's famous Autobiography , or his status as framer of the Declaration of Independence and the peace with Great Britain, or his experiments in electricity, or perhaps his sage advice on diligence and thrift. But historian Edmund S. Morgan invites us to meet the man himself, a sociable, good-natured, and extraordinary human being with boundless curiosity about the natural world and a vision of what America could be. Drawing on lifelong research in the vast Franklin archives, Morgan assembles both famous and lesser-known writings that offer insights into this founding father's thinking. The book is organized around four major themes, each with an introduction. The first section includes journal excerpts and letters revealing Franklin's personal tastes and habits. The second is devoted to Franklin's inexhaustible intellectual energy and his scientific discoveries. The third and fourth chronicle his devotion to serving the people who became the United States both before and after the Revolution and to advancing his democratic vision of their future. Franklin's humanity and genius have never seemed more real than in the pages of this appealing anthology.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
The Manp. 1
The Young Man and the Old Manp. 5
Journal of a Voyage, 1726
To George Whately, 1785
Friendship and Flirtationp. 25
Rules for Making Oneself a Disagreeable Companion, 1750
To Catharine Ray, 1755
To Mary Stevenson, 1767
To Anna Mordaunt Shipley, 1771
To Madame Brillon, 1778
Abigail Adams on Madame Helvetius, 1784
To Emma Thompson, 1777
The Uses of Laughterp. 45
The Speech of Miss Polly Baker, 1747
Leaping Whales, 1765
Remarks Concerning the Savages of North-America, ca. 1783
Religionp. 58
To Josiah and Abiah Franklin, 1738
To Joseph Huey, 1753
To Jane Mecom, 1758
Nature Observedp. 67
Sickness and Healthp. 71
On the Benefits of Moist Fresh Air, 1773
On Fresh Air, 1785
The Open Window: From the Autobiography of John Adams, 1776
To Benjamin Vaughan, 1786
Mesmerism, 1784
Wind, Weather, and Airp. 79
To Jared Eliot, 1750
To Peter Collinson, 1755
To Edward Nairne, 1780-83
To James Bowdoin, 1758
To Sir Joseph Banks, 1783
Ships and the Seap. 96
On the Motion of Vessels, 1784-85
The Gulf Stream, 1784-85
Advice for Travelers, 1784-85
Electric Firep. 112
Note on the Similarities Between Electricity and Lightning, 1749
Experiment to Determine Whether the Clouds That Contain Lightning Are Electrified, 1750
Joseph Priestley's Account of Franklin's Kite Experiment, 1752
How to Secure Houses, &c. from Lightning, 1753
Of Lightning, and the Method...of Securing Buildings and Persons from Its Mischievous Effects, 1767
To Peter Collinson, 1753
Geology and Cosmologyp. 132
To the Abbe Soulavie, 1782
Loose Thoughts on a Universal Fluid, &c., 1784-88
A Continental Visionp. 141
The Colonies and the Empirep. 143
On Transported Felons, 1751
Felons and Rattlesnakes, 1751
Thoughts on Immigrants, 1751
Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, 1751
Ethnic Pride and Prejudicep. 158
Indians and Germans, 1753
To Joshua Babcock, 1772
To John Waring, 1763
The Speech of Sidi Mehemet Ibrahim, 1790
Join or Diep. 170
To James Parker, 1751
The Albany Plan of Union, 1754
The Interest of Great Britain Considered [Canada Pamphlet], 1760
The Vision Challengedp. 185
To Peter Collinson, 1764
To William Franklin, 1765
Peace Is Sought by War, 1766
Franklin's Examination Before the Committee of the House of Commons, 1766
The Empire at Riskp. 199
To David Hall, 1766
To William Shirley, 1754
On the Disputes with America, 1767
New Fables, 1770
To Samuel Cooper, 1770
An Edict by the King of Prussia, 1773
To Joseph Galloway, 1775
To David Hartley, 1775
War, Peace, and Humanityp. 219
Independencep. 221
To Jonathan Shipley, 1775
To Joseph Priestley, 1775
To Admiral Lord Howe, 1776
Sketch of Propositions for a Peace, 1776
Poor Richard's Diplomacyp. 232
Comparison of Great Britain and America as to Credit, 1777
John Adams's Diplomatic Blunders, 1780
A Huckstered Peacep. 242
To James Hutton, 1778
Notes for a Conversation with Richard Oswald, 1782
Proposals for Diminishing the Occasions and Mischiefs of War, 1782
Thoughts on Privateering, 1782
Thoughts Concerning the Sugar Colonies, 1782
To William Strahan, 1784
The Costs of War, 1787
The Pretensions of Wealthp. 254
Thoughts on the House of Lords, 1775
Convention Speech on Salaries, 1787
Property Rights and Human Rights, 1785
The Moral Obligation of Taxes, 1783
Queries and Remarks on "Hints for the Members of the Pennsylvania Convention," 1789
Americap. 271
Arthur Lee's Conversation with Franklin About the Miracle of the Revolution, 1777
To Sarah Bache, 1784
Information to Those Who Would Remove to America, 1784
Speech in the Convention on the Constitution, 1787
Chronologyp. 289
Creditsp. 291
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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