Catalogue


Women's rights and transatlantic antislavery in the era of emancipation /
edited by Kathryn Kish Sklar and James Brewer Stewart.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2007.
description
xxiv, 385 p.
ISBN
0300115938 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780300115932 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2007.
isbn
0300115938 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780300115932 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
Based on lectures from a conference in Oct. 2002 at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University.
catalogue key
6138245
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
�This collection is undoubtedly the best and most wide-ranging collection that addresses the broad themes in the relationship between antislavery and women's rights."�Susan Zaeske, University of Wisconsin
"This collection is undoubtedly the best and most wide-ranging collection that addresses the broad themes in the relationship between antislavery and women''s rights."--Susan Zaeske, University of Wisconsin
"This collection is undoubtedly the best and most wide-ranging collection that addresses the broad themes in the relationship between antislavery and women''s rights."Susan Zaeske, University of Wisconsin
"This collection is undoubtedly the best and most wide-ranging collection that addresses the broad themes in the relationship between antislavery and women's rights."-Susan Zaeske, University of Wisconsin
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Approaching a wide range of transnational topics, the editors ask how conceptions of slavery & gendered society differed in the United States, France, Germany, & Britain.
Long Description
Two epochal developments profoundly influenced the history of the Atlantic world between 1770 and 1870--the rise of women's rights activism and the drive to eliminate chattel slavery. The contributors to this volume, eminent scholars from a variety of disciplines, investigate the intertwining histories of abolitionism and feminism on both sides of the Atlantic during this dynamic century of change. They illuminate the many ways that the two movements developed together and influenced one another. Approaching a wide range of transnational topics, the authors ask how conceptions of slavery and gendered society differed in the United States, France, Germany, and Britain; how women's activism reached across national boundaries; how racial identities affected the boundaries of women's activism; and what was distinctive about African-American women's participation as activists. Their thought-provoking answers provide rich insights into the history of struggles for social justice across the Atlantic world.
Main Description
Two epochal developments profoundly influenced the history of the Atlantic world between 1770 and 1870the rise of women's rights activism and the drive to eliminate chattel slavery. The contributors to this volume, eminent scholars from a variety of disciplines, investigate the intertwining histories of abolitionism and feminism on both sides of the Atlantic during this dynamic century of change. They illuminate the many ways that the two movements developed together and influenced one another. Approaching a wide range of transnational topics, the authors ask how conceptions of slavery and gendered society differed in the United States, France, Germany, and Britain; how women's activism reached across national boundaries; how racial identities affected the boundaries of women's activism; and what was distinctive about African-American women's participation as activists. Their thought-provoking answers provide rich insights into the history of struggles for social justice across the Atlantic world.
Table of Contents
Context - then and today
Declaring equality : sisterhood and slaveryp. 3
Sisterhood, slavery, and sovereignty : transnational antislavery work and women's rights movements in the United States during the twentieth centuryp. 19
The impact of antislavery on French, German, and British feminism
How (and why) the analogy of marriage with slavery provided the springboard for women's rights demands in France, 1640-1848p. 57
Frauenemancipation and beyond : the use of the concept of emancipation by early European feministsp. 82
Women's mobilization in the era of slave emancipation : some Anglo-French comparisonsp. 98
British abolition and feminism in transatlantic perspectivep. 121
The transatlantic activism of African-American women abolitionists
Sarah Forten's anti-slavery networksp. 143
Incidents abroad : Harriet Jacobs and the transatlantic movementp. 158
"Like hot lead to pour on the Americans ..." : Sarah Parker remond - from Salem, Mass., to the British Islesp. 173
Literary transnationalism and diasporic history : Frances Watkins Harper's "fancy sketches," 1859-60p. 189
Transatlantic influences on the emergence of women's rights in the United States
"The throne of my heart" : religion, oratory, and transatlantic community in Angelina Grimke's launching of women's rights, 1828-1838p. 211
The redemption of a heretic : Harriet Martineau and Anglo-American abolitionismp. 242
"Seeking a larger liberty" : remapping first wave feminismp. 266
Ernestine Rose's Jewish origins and the varieties of Euro-American emancipation in 1848p. 279
Transcultural activism against slavery by African-American women
Writing for true womanhood : African-American women's writings and the antislavery strugglep. 299
Enacting emancipation : African American women abolitionists at Oberlin College and the quest for empowerment, equality, and respectabilityp. 319
At the boundaries of abolitionism, feminism, and black nationalism : the activism of Mary Ann Shadd Caryp. 346
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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