Catalogue


Silence is death : the life and work of Tahar Djaout /
Julija Šukys.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.
description
x, 197 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803243200 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803243200 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.
isbn
0803243200 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803243200 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6124102
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [181]-191)and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-12-01:
Sukys (visiting scholar, McGill Univ.) has written a beautiful but unsentimental book about her search for Algerian poet Tahar Djaout, who was killed in 1993 at the height of Islamic terrorism against intellectuals. No work of dreary lit crit, this is creative nonfiction at its best. Beginning and ending in the Iowa city of Elkader (which was named after a young Algerian hero), the book reveals Djaout's extraordinary eloquence on every page, but it is framed as a detective novel: What connects a 19th-century Algerian hero with this midwestern town? What connects this European woman with a 20th-century Algerian man? Sukys strikes up an extraordinary "dialogue of the dead" with Djaout. She addresses him directly, telling him what she has discovered about him, and their lives become intertwined as she untangles and interprets the puzzle of his novels and poems. Though she has been warned of the danger of travel to Algeria, Sukys goes there. (Or does she? Did she invent the desert and Algiers that she describes at such loving length?) Finally, she conducts a posthumous interview with Djaout, who said "Silence is death" and who paid with his life for demanding intellectual freedom, honesty, and tolerance. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates; general readers. M. Cooke Duke University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In Silence Is Death: The Life and Work of Tahar Djaoutone gets a sense of the man, the artist, and Ms. sukys herself. With a lyrical nomadism, she combines her study with detours into memoir and even fiction on themes of bones and memory."Nina C. Ayoub, The Chronicle of Higher Education
"One is left with . . . a feeling of the menace of the regime in 1990s Algeria, Dajout's ambition for his country, and something of his literary style."--TImes Literary Supplement, 28 September 2007
" In "Silence Is Death: The Life and Work of Tahar Djaout" one gets a sense of the man, the artist, and Ms. S ukys herself. With a lyrical nomadism, she combines her study with detours into memoir and even fiction on themes of bones and memory." -- Nina C. Ayoub, "The Chronicle of Higher Education"
"In "Silence Is Death: The Life and Work of Tahar Djaout" one gets a sense of the man, the artist, and Ms. Sukys herself. With a lyrical nomadism, she combines her study with detours into memoir and even fiction on themes of bones and memory."-Nina C. Ayoub, "The Chronicle of Higher Education"
"In Silence Is Death: The Life and Work of Tahar Djaout one gets a sense of the man, the artist, and Ms. Sukys herself. With a lyrical nomadism, she combines her study with detours into memoir and even fiction on themes of bones and memory."-Nina C. Ayoub, The Chronicle of Higher Education
"InSilence Is Death: The Life and Work of Tahar Djaoutone gets a sense of the man, the artist, and Ms. sukys herself. With a lyrical nomadism, she combines her study with detours into memoir and even fiction on themes of bones and memory."Nina C. Ayoub,The Chronicle of Higher Education
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
On May 26, 1993, the Algerian novelist and poet Tahar Djaout was gunned down in an attack attributed to Islamist extremists. An outspoken critic of the extremism roiling his nation, Djaout, in his death, became a powerful symbol for the "murder of Algerian culture, " as scores of journalists, writers, and scholars were targeted in a swelling wave of violence. The author of twelve books of fiction and poetry, Djaout was murdered at a critical point in his career, just as his literary voice was maturing. His death was a great loss not only for Algeria and for Francophone literature but also for world literature. Rage at the news of his slaying was explosive but did nothing to quell the increasing bloodshed. "Silence Is Death" considers the life and work of Djaout in light of his murder and his role in the conflict that raged between Islamist terrorist cells and Algeria's military regime in the 1990s. The result is an innovative meditation on death, authorship, and the political role of intellectuals. By collapsing the genres of history, biography, personal memoir, fiction, and cultural analysis, Julija Sukys investigates notions of authorial neutrality as well as the relationship between reader and writer in life and in death. Her work offers a view of reading as an encounter across time and place and opens the possibility of a relationship between different cultures under peaceful terms.
Main Description
On May 26, 1993, the Algerian novelist and poet Tahar Djaout was gunned down in an attack attributed to Islamist extremists. An outspoken critic of the extremism roiling his nation, Djaout, in his death, became a powerful symbol for the "murder of Algerian culture," as scores of journalists, writers, and scholars were targeted in a swelling wave of violence. The author of twelve books of fiction and poetry, Djaout was murdered at a critical point in his career, just as his literary voice was maturing. His death was a great loss not only for Algeria and for Francophone literature but also for world literature. Rage at the news of his slaying was explosive but did nothing to quell the increasing bloodshed. Silence Is Deathconsiders the life and work of Djaout in light of his murder and his role in the conflict that raged between Islamist terrorist cells and Algeria's military regime in the 1990s. The result is an innovative meditation on death, authorship, and the political role of intellectuals. By collapsing the genres of history, biography, personal memoir, fiction, and cultural analysis, Julija sukys investigates notions of authorial neutrality as well as the relationship between reader and writer in life and in death. Her work offers a view of reading as an encounter across time and place and opens the possibility of a relationship between different cultures under peaceful terms.
Bowker Data Service Summary
On May 26, 1993, the Algerian novelist and poet Tahar Djaout was gunned down in an attack attributed to Islamist extremists. This text considers the life and work of Djaout in light of his murder and his role in the conflict that raged between Islamist terrorist cells and Algeria's military regime in the 1990s.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Welcome to Elkaderp. 3
The Death of the Authorp. 14
Poetry, Prose, and the Politics of Writing in Algeriap. 41
Final Projectsp. 64
Dialogues with the Deadp. 87
Voyage Immobilep. 115
A Posthumous Interview with Tahar Djaoutp. 135
Notesp. 145
Works Citedp. 181
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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