Catalogue


Imperial connections : India in the Indian Ocean arena, 1860-1920 /
Thomas R. Metcalf.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
description
xv, 264 p. : ill.
ISBN
0520249461 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520249462 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
isbn
0520249461 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520249462 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6114742
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-252) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Imperial Connections challenges the Eurocentrism implicit in many accounts of modern European empires. Focusing on the British empire when it was at its zenith, Meltcalf analyzes the pivotal role the Raj played in the running of the empire in regions as far flung from one another as, say, Egypt, Uganda, Natal, and the Malay peninsula. This innovative book is a real tour de force from a respected and versatile historian of India."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, author of Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference "As he has done regularly throughout his career, Thomas Metcalf has once again refreshed the study of British imperial history with a bold new perspective. Imperial Connections puts South Asians -- soldiers, policemen and labourers -- right at the heart of his study."--C.A. Bayly, Cambridge University, author of The Birth of the Modern World "This is a distinctly original study which re-centers colonial power in provocative ways. Metcalf asks a simple question -- why were Indians so persistently to be found elsewhere in the British empire, and in such significant numbers? Then elegantly offers answers that force us to re-think the operations of imperial power in critical ways. Wide-ranging, elegantly written, and meticulously researched, Metcalf's is an important and a persuasive study."--Philippa Levine, author of Prostitution, Race and Politics: Policing Venereal Disease in the British Empire, and forthcoming, The British Empire, Sunrise to SunsetÊ
Flap Copy
"Imperial Connections challenges the Eurocentrism implicit in many accounts of modern European empires. Focusing on the British empire when it was at its zenith, Metcalf analyzes the pivotal role the Raj played in the running of the empire in regions as far flung from one another as, say, Egypt, Uganda, Natal, and the Malay peninsula. This innovative book is a real tour de force from a respected and versatile historian of India."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, author of "Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference" "As he has done regularly throughout his career, Thomas Metcalf has once again refreshed the study of British imperial history with a bold new perspective. Imperial Connections puts South Asians--soldiers, policemen and labourers--right at the heart of his study."--C.A. Bayly, Cambridge University, author of "The Birth of the Modern World" "This is a distinctly original study which re-centers colonial power in provocative ways. Metcalf asks a simple question--why were Indians so persistently to be found elsewhere in the British empire, and in such significant numbers? Then elegantly offers answers that force us to re-think the operations of imperial power in critical ways. Wide-ranging, elegantly written, and meticulously researched, Metcalf's is an important and a persuasive study."--Philippa Levine, author of "Prostitution, Race and Politics: Policing Venereal Disease in the British Empire, and forthcoming, The British Empire, Sunrise to Sunset"
Flap Copy
"Imperial Connections challenges the Eurocentrism implicit in many accounts of modern European empires. Focusing on the British empire when it was at its zenith, Metcalf analyzes the pivotal role the Raj played in the running of the empire in regions as far flung from one another as, say, Egypt, Uganda, Natal, and the Malay peninsula. This innovative book is a real tour de force from a respected and versatile historian of India."--Dipesh Chakrabarty, author of Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference "As he has done regularly throughout his career, Thomas Metcalf has once again refreshed the study of British imperial history with a bold new perspective. Imperial Connections puts South Asians--soldiers, policemen and labourers--right at the heart of his study."--C.A. Bayly, Cambridge University, author of The Birth of the Modern World "This is a distinctly original study which re-centers colonial power in provocative ways. Metcalf asks a simple question--why were Indians so persistently to be found elsewhere in the British empire, and in such significant numbers? Then elegantly offers answers that force us to re-think the operations of imperial power in critical ways. Wide-ranging, elegantly written, and meticulously researched, Metcalf's is an important and a persuasive study."--Philippa Levine, author of Prostitution, Race and Politics: Policing Venereal Disease in the British Empire, and forthcoming, The British Empire, Sunrise to Sunset
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-10-01:
India was the "jewel in the Crown," the center of the British Empire in Asia, the locus around which and from which the British built an empire in Southeast Asia and Africa. Metcalf (emer., Berkeley) documents the role played by India--especially its army, police, and administrative practices--in these areas. He looks at the Indian antecedents of some of the leading officials involved and how they directly applied Indian administrative practices or used the idea of Indian practices to develop new ones. East Africa receives a special chapter of its own, where, for example, the building of the Uganda Railway using Indian labor, Indian accounting practices, and even the Indian rail gauge created "a wedge of India" across Africa. Some British officials argued for an Indian empire in East Africa before the Colonial Office took responsibility away from the India Office in 1921. In architecture, too, the Indian influence manifested itself, and Metcalf offers material from his An Imperial Vision: Indian Architecture and Britain's Raj (CH, Oct'89, 27-0743). With names, facts, figures, and concepts, this is a detailed, fine, and useful study of the extent and the limits of the Indian influence in the Indian Ocean. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. R. D. Long Eastern Michigan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A welcome and comprehensive effort to bring what is variously a transnational, imperial, oceanic, and a global history forward."
"A welcome and comprehensive effort to bring what is variously a transnational, imperial, oceanic, and a global history forward."-- Canadian Journal of History
"A welcome and comprehensive effort to bring what is variously a transnational, imperial, oceanic, and a global history forward."-- Canadian Jrnl of History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
An innovative remapping of empire, Imperial Connections offers a broad-ranging view of the workings of the British Empire in the period when the India of the Raj stood at the center of a newly globalized system of trade, investment, and migration. Thomas R. Metcalf argues that India itself became a nexus of imperial power that made possible British conquest, control, and governance across a wide arc of territory stretching from Africa to eastern Asia. His book, offering a new perspective on how imperialism operates, emphasizes transcolonial interactions and webs of influence that advanced the interests of colonial India and Britain alike. Metcalf examines such topics as law codes and administrative forms as they were shaped by Indian precedents; the Indian Army's role in securing Malaya, Africa, and Mesopotamia for the empire; the employment of Indians, especially Sikhs, in colonial policing; and the transformation of East Africa into what was almost a province of India through the construction of the Uganda railway. He concludes with a look at the decline of this Indian Ocean system after 1920 and considers how far India's participation in it opened opportunities for Indians to be a colonizing as well as a colonized people.
Long Description
An innovative remapping of empire,Imperial Connectionsoffers a broad-ranging view of the workings of the British Empire in the period when the India of the Raj stood at the center of a newly globalized system of trade, investment, and migration. Thomas R. Metcalf argues that India itself became a nexus of imperial power that made possible British conquest, control, and governance across a wide arc of territory stretching from Africa to eastern Asia. His book, offering a new perspective on how imperialism operates, emphasizes transcolonial interactions and webs of influence that advanced the interests of colonial India and Britain alike. Metcalf examines such topics as law codes and administrative forms as they were shaped by Indian precedents; the Indian Army's role in securing Malaya, Africa, and Mesopotamia for the empire; the employment of Indians, especially Sikhs, in colonial policing; and the transformation of East Africa into what was almost a province of India through the construction of the Uganda railway. He concludes with a look at the decline of this Indian Ocean system after 1920 and considers how far India's participation in it opened opportunities for Indians to be a colonizing as well as a colonized people.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introduction: Empire Recenteredp. 1
Governing Colonial Peoplesp. 16
Constructing Identitiesp. 46
Projecting Power: The Indian Army Overseasp. 68
Recruiting Sikhs for Colonial Police and Militaryp. 102
"Hard Hands and Sound Healthy Bodies": Recruiting "Coolies" for Natalp. 136
India in East Africap. 165
Conclusionp. 204
List of Abbreviationsp. 223
Notesp. 225
Bibliographyp. 249
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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