Catalogue


The Yorkists : the history of a dynasty /
Anne Crawford.
imprint
London : Hambledon Continuum, 2007.
description
xx, 200 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1852853514 (hbk.), 9781852853518 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Hambledon Continuum, 2007.
isbn
1852853514 (hbk.)
9781852853518 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6113552
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [187]-190) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-02-01:
Kings Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III represented the Yorkist family on the English throne in the 15th century. Crawford (archivist, Wells Cathedral) has been researching the house of York for many years and has written an excellent history of the dynasty. She begins with Richard, Duke of York, the father of Edward IV and Richard III, and takes the story through the duke's granddaughter Elizabeth of York, queen of Henry VII. Her evaluation of the many individuals in the story and her analysis of such major events as the usurpation of Richard III and the fate of his nephews, the "Princes in the Tower," are thoughtful and reasoned. Accounts of Yorkist women add a significant informative feature, and the sometimes-complex genealogy necessary for a family history is detailed by careful narrative supported by family trees of York, Lancaster, Nevill, and Woodville. The sparse endnotes and bibliography belie wide research. Illustrations. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. A. C. Reeves emeritus, Ohio University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Crawford (archivist, Wells Cathedral) has been researching the house of York for many years and has written an excellent history of the dynasty. She begins with Richard, Duke of York, the father of Edward IV and Richard III, and takes the story through the duke's granddaughter Elizabeth of York, queen of Henry VII. Her evaluation of the many individuals in the story and her analysis of such major events as the usurpation of Richard III and the fate of his nephews, the 'Princes in the Tower,' are thoughtful and reasoned. Accounts of Yorkist women and a significant informative feature, and the sometimes-complex genealogy necessary for a family history is detailed by careful narrative supported by family trees of York, Lancaster, Nevill, and Woodville...Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." -A. C. Reeves, CHOICE, February 2008
&"Crawford (archivist, Wells Cathedral) has been researching the house of York for many years and has written an excellent history of the dynasty. She begins with Richard, Duke of York, the father of Edward IV and Richard III, and takes the story through the duke's granddaughter Elizabeth of York, queen of Henry VII. Her evaluation of the many individuals in the story and her analysis of such major events as the usurpation of Richard III and the fate of his nephews, the 'Princes in the Tower,' are thoughtful and reasoned. Accounts of Yorkist women and a significant informative feature, and the sometimes-complex genealogy necessary for a family history is detailed by careful narrative supported by family trees of York, Lancaster, Nevill, and Woodville...Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries.&" -A. C. Reeves, CHOICE, February 2008
"The author is an authority on royalty." -Colin Richmond, The Historian, Vol. 71
"This book is an overview of the Yorkist dynasty, straying into Henry VIII's reign to include Elisabeth of York. It is an excellent text book for A level students" Reviewed by Jane Trump, Re Ricardian XVIII, 2008
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2007
Choice, February 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
'Now tis the winter of our discontent'...made glorious summer by this fine study of the Yorkist Dynasty
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Yorkists include both the most wicked king in English history, Richard III, and the most tragic, his nephew Edward V, one of the Princes in the Tower. This book examines the truth behind both the characters of these kings and behind the stories in the plays, including the death of the duke of Clarence.
Unpaid Annotation
The Yorkists include both the most wicked king in English history (probably!), Richard III, and the most tragic, his nephew Edward V, one of the Princes in the Tower. They had come to the throne in 1461, when Edward IV, who traced his claim to Edward III, replaced the ineffectual Henry VI as king. Forced into exile in 1470, Edward returned to power after the bloody battle of Towton in 1470 finally ended Lancastrian opposition. His reign, which saw the prefiguring of many of the Tudors' achievements, re-established royal power at home and English prestige abroad, its stability only being ended by his premature death in 1473, leaving behind his son Edward, a minor, as his heir. Richard III's usurpation was short-lived, being ended by his defeat and death at Bosworth in 1485. The dynasty lived on, however, in the offspring of Edward IV's daughter and eventual heir, Elizabeth of York, who married Henry VII. Others with Yorkist blood in the veins were less fortunate, being almost all imprisoned or executed by the Tudors.
Unpaid Annotation
The Yorkists include arguably the most wicked king in English history, Richard III, and the most tragic, his nephew Edward V, one of the Princes in the Tower. They had come to the throne in 1461, when Edward IV, who traced his claim to Edward III, replaced the ineffectual Henry VI as king. Forced into exile in 1470, Edward returned to power after the bloody battle of Towton in 1470 finally ended Lancastrian opposition. His reign, which saw the prefiguring of many of the Tudors' achievements, re-established royal power at home and English prestige abroad, its stability only being ended by his premature death in 1483, leaving behind his son Edward, a minor, as his heir. This led to Richard III's usurpation, ended two years later by his defeat and death at Bosworth Field at the hands of Henry Tudor, who became Henry VII and the founder of a new dynasty, marrying Elizabeth of York, the daughter of Edward IV. Others with Yorkist blood in their veins were less fortunate, being almost all imprisoned or executed by the Tudors. The Yorkists were one of the two main contending parties in England's first great civil war, the Wars of the Roses. They have been immortalized by Shakespeare not only in his Richard III but also in his three parts of Henry VI. Anne Crawford examines the truth behind both the characters of these kings and behind the stories in the plays, including the death of the duke of Clarence by drowning in a butt of malmsey and the celebrated murder of his nephews, Edward V and Richard, duke of York, by their uncle, Richard III.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Richard of Yorkp. 1
Edward IV's First Reignp. 21
Edward IV's Second Reignp. 35
Edward the Kingp. 49
The King's Mother and the Queenp. 63
Nevills and Woodvillesp. 75
The King's Brothersp. 89
The King's Sistersp. 105
Edward Vp. 119
Richard IIIp. 135
Elizabeth of York and the Pretendersp. 151
Conclusionp. 169
The Question of Edward IV's Legitimacyp. 173
Edward IV's Possible Pre-contract of Marriagep. 179
Notesp. 181
Bibliographyp. 187
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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