Catalogue


Lone star lawmen : the second century of the Texas Rangers /
Robert M. Utley.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
description
xiii, 400 p.
ISBN
0195154444 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780195154443 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
isbn
0195154444 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780195154443 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue -- The border, 1910-1915 -- The "bandit war," 1915 -- The Big Bend, 1913-1919 -- Austin, 1919 -- Pat Neff's "battles of peace," 1921-1925 -- Ma and Pa Ferguson, 1925-1927 -- Dan Moody, 1927-1931 -- Ross and Bill Sterling, 1931-1933 -- Return of the Fergusons, 1933-1935 -- The Department of Public Safety, 1935 -- DPS birth pangs, 1935-1938 -- Homer Garrison, 1938-1968 -- Gambling ... and other distractions -- Latino uprising -- Change, 1965-1985 -- Highs and lows, 1970s -- Highs and lows, 1980s -- Highs and lows, 1990s -- A summing up.
catalogue key
6107497
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 381-390) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Spur Awards, USA, 2008 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2006-12-18:
In this follow-up to Lone Star Justice, Utley tells how the Texas Rangers entered the 20th century as an effective if idiosyncratic law enforcement outfit and entered the 21st century as the investigative arm of the Texas Department of Public Safety. In a dry style, Utley describes the Rangers' various commanders, troopers and exploits. Through the first third of the 20th century, the Rangers operated in an extralegal fashion-their existence was at the whim of whoever occupied the governor's mansion in Austin. It wasn't until 1935 that the Rangers were made official and brought into the newly formed DPS. Utley is far too enamored of the Rangers for his book's good. While his precise if plodding prose doesn't hype the Rangers' exploits, and he acknowledges a "dark period" early in the 20th century when weak leaders failed to control their men, he treads so lightly on so many issues-prisoner treatment (brutal), racial integration (belated) and especially gender equality (a glaring problem Utley chalks up to "the lack of female applicants")-that it is hard to see this as the definitive account it aspires to be. 30 b&w illus. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A continuation of the author's Lone Star Justice, bringing the tale of the renowned-and sometimes infamous-Texas Rangers to present...A valuable addition to the libary of Texana."--Kirkus Reviews
"If you like crime stories or westerns, dont miss this first-class book."--Greenwich Time
"In Lone Star Lawmen our pre-eminent historian of the American West has presented a thorough and vividly written assessment of this great, often controversial, assemblage of Texas lawmen."--Roundup Magazine
"In this follow-up to Lone Star Justice, Utley tells how the Texas Rangers entered the 20th century as an effective if idiosyncratic law enforcement outfit and entered the 21st century as the investigative arm of the Texas Department of Public Safety. In a dry style, Utley describes theRangers various commanders, troopers and exploits."--Publishers Weekly
"In this follow-up to Lone Star Justice, Utley tells how the Texas Rangers entered the 20th century as an effective if idiosyncratic law enforcement outfit and entered the 21st century as the investigative arm of the Texas Department of Public Safety. In a dry style, Utley describes the Rangers various commanders, troopers and exploits."--Publishers Weekly "This book is a winner. Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice and Lone Star Lawmen are the best books ever written about the Texas Rangers. His brilliant account makes the story of the Rangers central to an understanding of Texas history, and his talent for vivid storytelling enthralls us to the very end." -- Howard R. Lamar, Sterling Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University "Utley rounds out his history of the Texas Rangers with a brisk account of their high points and their lows, their heroes and their villains, during the Twentieth Century. Exploring both the darkness and the sunshine, his well-rounded book is certain to create controversy among both supporters and detractors of the Rangers."--Elmer Kelton, author of Texas Vendetta and The Buckskin Line "No one has done more to illuminate the real American Western experience and separate it from fictionalizing and folklore than Robert Utley. Lone Star Lawmen completes his landmark history of the Texas Rangers, from the last days of the outlaws to the modern challenges of patrolling an international border. Throughout Utley is cogent, authoritative, and unfailingly interesting, a Lone Star Historian at his best." William C. Davis, author of Three Roads to the Alamo
"Most historians and enthusiasts have naively viewed 'motorized Rangers' as less interesting or proficient than 'horseback Rangers.' Utley shatters this myth by reconstructing the turbulent evolution of the Rangers from frontier lawmen into an internationally respected investigative force.Perseverance, adaptability and dedication to timeless core values have sustained the Rangers through political instability and questionable leadership. This is why there are, and will always be, Texas Rangers."-- Byron A. Johnson, Director, Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum
"No one has done more to illuminate the real American Western experience and separate it from fictionalizing and folklore than Robert Utley. Lone Star Lawmen completes his landmark history of the Texas Rangers, from the last days of the outlaws to the modern challenges of patrolling aninternational border. Throughout Utley is cogent, authoritative, and unfailingly interesting, a Lone Star Historian at his best." William C. Davis, author of Three Roads to the Alamo
"One of the leading historians of the American West, Robert M. Utley continues the story of the Texas Rangers from 1900 to present in his second volume on this group, Lone Star Lawmen: The Second Century of the Texas Rangers. As I dipped into the advance reading copy... I found my curiositywhetted...This portrait of legendary peace officers, complete with historical photos, will provide insight on their role in a changing West."--Corpus Christie Caller
"Perhaps the most common question arising after the publication of Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice in 2002 was whether the promised second volume would match the first for compelling stories of lone Rangers battling Indians and outlaws on the Texas frontier...The answer, happily, is that Mr.Utley has risen to the occasion...this well-researched study adds enormously to Texas history and offers a reasonably objective treatment of one of the most unique and controversial organizations Texas ever produced."--Dallas Morning News
"Perhaps the most common question arising after the publication of Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice in 2002 was whether the promised second volume would match the first for compelling stories of lone Rangers battling Indians and outlaws on the Texas frontier...The answer, happily, is that Mr. Utley has risen to the occasion...this well-researched study adds enormously to Texas history and offers a reasonably objective treatment of one of the most unique and controversial organizations Texas ever produced."--Dallas Morning News "In this follow-up to Lone Star Justice, Utley tells how the Texas Rangers entered the 20th century as an effective if idiosyncratic law enforcement outfit and entered the 21st century as the investigative arm of the Texas Department of Public Safety. In a dry style, Utley describes the Rangers various commanders, troopers and exploits."--Publishers Weekly "In Lone Star Lawmen our pre-eminent historian of the American West has presented a thorough and vividly written assessment of this great, often controversial, assemblage of Texas lawmen."--Roundup Magazine "This book is a winner. Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice and Lone Star Lawmen are the best books ever written about the Texas Rangers. His brilliant account makes the story of the Rangers central to an understanding of Texas history, and his talent for vivid storytelling enthralls us to the very end." -- Howard R. Lamar, Sterling Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University "Utley rounds out his history of the Texas Rangers with a brisk account of their high points and their lows, their heroes and their villains, during the Twentieth Century. Exploring both the darkness and thesunshine, his well-rounded book is certain to create controversy among both supporters and detractors of the Rangers."--Elmer Kelton, author of Texas Vendetta and The Buckskin Line "No one has done more to illuminate the real American Western experience and separate it from fictionalizing and folklore than Robert Utley. Lone Star Lawmen completes his landmark history of the Texas Rangers, from the last days of the outlaws to the modern challenges of patrolling an international border. Throughout Utley is cogent, authoritative, and unfailingly interesting, a Lone Star Historian at his best." William C. Davis, author of Three Roads to the Alamo
"Perhaps the most common question arising after the publication of Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice in 2002 was whether the promised second volume would match the first for compelling stories of lone Rangers battling Indians and outlaws on the Texas frontier...The answer, happily, is that Mr. Utley has risen to the occasion...this well-researched study adds enormously to Texas history and offers a reasonably objective treatment of one of the most unique and controversial organizations Texas ever produced."-- Dallas Morning News "What's most astounding is his singular ability to blend deep research with a mind-boggling grasp of secondary source materials. Then, like an alchemist, he uses his gift for old-fashioned storytelling to write beautifully rendered narratives... Honest, pragmatic and usually right, Utley's action-packed newest effort, 'Lone Star: The Second Century of the Texas Rangers,'belongs on all readers' Western Americana bookshelves, next to the best efforts of Webb, Dobie and Prescott."-- Austin American-Statesman "In this follow-up to Lone Star Justice , Utley tells how the Texas Rangers entered the 20th century as an effective if idiosyncratic law enforcement outfit and entered the 21st century as the investigative arm of the Texas Department of Public Safety. In a dry style, Utley describes the Rangers various commanders, troopers and exploits."-- Publishers Weekly "In Lone Star Lawmen our pre-eminent historian of the American West has presented a thorough and vividly written assessment of this great, often controversial, assemblage of Texas lawmen."-- Roundup Magazine "This book is a winner. Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice and Lone Star Lawmen are the best books ever written about the Texas Rangers. His brilliant account makes the story of the Rangers central to an understanding of Texas history, and his talent for vivid storytelling enthralls us to the very end."--Howard R. Lamar, Sterling Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University "Utley rounds out his history of the Texas Rangers with a brisk account of their high points and their lows, their heroes and their villains, during the Twentieth Century. Exploring both the darkness and the sunshine, his well-rounded book is certain to create controversy among both supporters and detractors of the Rangers."--Elmer Kelton, author of Texas Vendetta and The Buckskin Line "No one has done more to illuminate the real American Western experience and separate it from fictionalizing and folklore than Robert Utley. Lone Star Lawmen completes his landmark history of the Texas Rangers, from the last days of the outlaws to the modern challenges of patrolling an international border. Throughout Utley is cogent, authoritative, and unfailingly interesting, a Lone Star Historian at his best."--William C. Davis, author of Three Roads to the Alamo "Lively with stories of crime and punishment, victory and disappointment. It is sure to be controversial...naming names and claling them as he sees them: the good, the bad, the modest, the flamboyant, and the incompetent."-- Montana: The Magazine of Western History
"Perhaps the most common question arising after the publication of Robert Utley'sLone Star Justicein 2002 was whether the promised second volume would match the first for compelling stories of lone Rangers battling Indians and outlaws on the Texas frontier...The answer, happily, is that Mr. Utley has risen to the occasion...this well-researched study adds enormously to Texas history and offers a reasonably objective treatment of one of the most unique and controversial organizations Texas ever produced."--Dallas Morning News "What's most astounding is his singular ability to blend deep research with a mind-boggling grasp of secondary source materials. Then, like an alchemist, he uses his gift for old-fashioned storytelling to write beautifully rendered narratives... Honest, pragmatic and usually right, Utley's action-packed newest effort, 'Lone Star: The Second Century of the Texas Rangers,'belongs on all readers' Western Americana bookshelves, next to the best efforts of Webb, Dobie and Prescott."--Austin American-Statesman "In this follow-up toLone Star Justice, Utley tells how the Texas Rangers entered the 20th century as an effective if idiosyncratic law enforcement outfit and entered the 21st century as the investigative arm of the Texas Department of Public Safety. In a dry style, Utley describes the Rangers various commanders, troopers and exploits."--Publishers Weekly "InLone Star Lawmenour pre-eminent historian of the American West has presented a thorough and vividly written assessment of this great, often controversial, assemblage of Texas lawmen."--Roundup Magazine "This book is a winner. Robert Utley'sLone Star JusticeandLone Star Lawmenare the best books ever written about the Texas Rangers. His brilliant account makes the story of the Rangers central to an understanding of Texas history, and his talent for vivid storytelling enthralls us to the very end."--Howard R. Lamar, Sterling Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University "Utley rounds out his history of the Texas Rangers with a brisk account of their high points and their lows, their heroes and their villains, during the Twentieth Century. Exploring both the darkness and the sunshine, his well-rounded book is certain to create controversy among both supporters and detractors of the Rangers."--Elmer Kelton, author ofTexas VendettaandThe Buckskin Line "No one has done more to illuminate the real American Western experience and separate it from fictionalizing and folklore than Robert Utley.Lone Star Lawmencompletes his landmark history of the Texas Rangers, from the last days of the outlaws to the modern challenges of patrolling an international border. Throughout Utley is cogent, authoritative, and unfailingly interesting, a Lone Star Historian at his best."--William C. Davis, author ofThree Roads to the Alamo "Lively with stories of crime and punishment, victory and disappointment. It is sure to be controversial...naming names and claling them as he sees them: the good, the bad, the modest, the flamboyant, and the incompetent."--Montana: The Magazine of Western History
"This book is a winner. Robert Utley's Lone Star Justice and Lone Star Lawmen are the best books ever written about the Texas Rangers. His brilliant account makes the story of the Rangers central to an understanding of Texas history, and his talent for vivid storytelling enthralls us to thevery end." -- Howard R. Lamar, Sterling Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University
"Utley rounds out his history of the Texas Rangers with a brisk account of their high points and their lows, their heroes and their villains, during the Twentieth Century. Exploring both the darkness and the sunshine, his well-rounded book is certain to create controversy among both supportersand detractors of the Rangers."--Elmer Kelton, author of Texas Vendetta and The Buckskin Line
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Hailed as "a rip-snortin', six-guns-blazin' saga of good guys and bad guys who were sometimes one and the same," Robert M. Utley's Lone Star Justice captured the colorful first century of Texas Ranger history. Now, in the eagerly anticipated conclusion, Lone Star Lawmen, Utley once againchronicles the daring exploits of the Rangers, this time as they bring justice to the twentieth-century West. Based on unprecedented access to Ranger archives, this fast-paced narrative stretches from the days of the Mexican Revolution (where atrocities against Mexican Americans marked the nadir of Ranger history) to the Branch Davidian saga near Waco and the recent bloody standoff with "Republic ofTexas" militia. Readers will find in these pages one hundred years of high adventure. Utley follows the Rangers as they pursue bank robbers, bootleggers, moonshiners, and "horsebackers" (smugglers who used mule trains to bring liquor across the border). We see these fearless lawmen taming oilboomtowns, springing the ambush of Bonnie and Clyde, facing down angry lynch mobs, and tracking the "Phantom Killer" of Texarkana. Utley also highlights the gradual evolution of this celebrated force, revealing that while West Texas Rangers still occasionally ride the range on horseback and crackdown on smugglers and rustlers, East Texas Rangers--who work mostly in big cities--now ride in high-powered cars and contend with kidnappers, forgers, and other urban criminals. But East or West, today's Rangers have become sophisticated professionals, backed by crime labs and forensic science. Written by one of the most respected Western historians alive, here is the definitive account of the Texas Rangers, a vivid portrait of these legendary peace officers and their role in a changing West.
Main Description
Hailed as "a rip-snortin', six-guns-blazin' saga of good guys and bad guys who were sometimes one and the same," Robert M. Utley'sLone Star Justicecaptured the colorful first century of Texas Ranger history. Now, in the eagerly anticipated conclusion,Lone Star Lawmen, Utley once again chronicles the daring exploits of the Rangers, this time as they bring justice to the twentieth-century West. Based on unprecedented access to Ranger archives, this fast-paced narrative stretches from the days of the Mexican Revolution (where atrocities against Mexican Americans marked the nadir of Ranger history) to the Branch Davidian saga near Waco and the recent bloody standoff with "Republic of Texas" militia. Readers will find in these pages one hundred years of high adventure. Utley follows the Rangers as they pursue bank robbers, bootleggers, moonshiners, and "horsebackers" (smugglers who used mule trains to bring liquor across the border). We see these fearless lawmen taming oil boomtowns, springing the ambush of Bonnie and Clyde, facing down angry lynch mobs, and tracking the "Phantom Killer" of Texarkana. Utley also highlights the gradual evolution of this celebrated force, revealing that while West Texas Rangers still occasionally ride the range on horseback and crack down on smugglers and rustlers, East Texas Rangers--who work mostly in big cities--now ride in high-powered cars and contend with kidnappers, forgers, and other urban criminals. But East or West, today's Rangers have become sophisticated professionals, backed by crime labs and forensic science. Written by one of the most respected Western historians alive, here is the definitive account of the Texas Rangers, a vivid portrait of these legendary peace officers and their role in a changing West.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Prologuep. 1
The Border, 1910-1915p. 8
The "Bandit War," 1915p. 26
The Big Bend, 1913-1919p. 48
Austin, 1918-1919p. 68
Pat Neff's "Battles of Peace," 1921-1925p. 85
Ma and Pa Ferguson, 1925-1927p. 109
Dan Moody, 1927-1931p. 119
Ross and Bill Sterling, 1931-1933p. 142
Return of the Fergusons, 1933-1935p. 152
The Department of Public Safety, 1935p. 166
DPS Birth Pangs, 1935-1938p. 179
Homer Garrison, 1938-1968p. 192
Gambling...and Other Distractionsp. 216
Latino Uprisingp. 235
Change, 1965-1985p. 254
Highs and Lows, 1970sp. 265
Highs and Lows, 1980sp. 282
Highs and Lows, 1990sp. 303
A Summing-Upp. 329
Abbreviationsp. 342
Notesp. 344
Sourcesp. 381
Indexp. 391
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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