Catalogue

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The origins of FBI counterintelligence /
Raymond J. Batvinis.
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2007.
description
xii, 332 p.
ISBN
0700614958 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780700614950 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2007.
isbn
0700614958 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780700614950 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Rumrich -- A look back -- Controversy and confusion -- Interdepartmental intelligence conference -- Following the money -- Wires and bugs -- Opportunities missed -- Special overseas assignments -- British security coordination -- Special intelligence service -- Ducase -- Appendix A: Sebold's list of Abwehr requirements -- Appendix B: Duquesne ring conspirators -- Appendix C: Unindicted Duquesne ring coconspirators -- Appendix D: Sentences of the Duquesne ring conspirators -- Appendix E: Expenditures for special intelligence service operations, July 2, 1940-June 30, 1947.
catalogue key
6107416
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-317) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-02-01:
Longtime FBI agent Batvinis has produced a pioneering volume (originally his Catholic Univ. dissertation) that will be essential reading for all FBI and espionage buffs, but one that is very narrowly focused and lacking in context. Based primarily on extensive interviews and archival research, the book centers on the (pre-CIA) 1936-45 era, when the FBI, apparently with President Roosevelt's blessings, dominated US counterintelligence work. This topic has been drastically underplayed in prior FBI studies, which center on longtime director J. Edgar Hoover personally and/or the bureau's roles in fighting domestic crime and "subversion." Batvinis portrays an agency that, while essentially new to counterintelligence work, had considerable and widely publicized success in cracking German-directed WW II espionage rings. With his narrow focus, Batvinis claims Hoover became a national hero as a result (although other scholars date his lionization to the mid-1930s gangster era), portrays Hoover as led by FDR almost against his will into countersubversion (while others paint Hoover as always eager to expand FBI powers), and completely neglects the WW II Office of Strategic Services and connections with the postwar emergence of the CIA and the concomitant "Venona" Russian espionage revelations. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. J. Goldstein formerly, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An important book on a little-explored aspect of FBI history." -- Athan Theoharis
"A richly detailed account of the FBI's response to the world crisis of the 1930s and 1940s that overturns much accepted 'wisdom' about FBI intelligence failures and turf battles. Batvinis stays close to his sources while telling an engrossing story that should become the new standard account of FBI counter-intelligence. A stimulating and fascinating work." -- Richard Gid Powers
"A strong and compelling book on the FBI's pre-World War II transformation." -- Katherine Sibley
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2008
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Summaries
Long Description
As the world prepared for war in the 1930s, the United States discovered that it faced the real threat of foreign spies stealing military and industrial secrets--and that it had no established means to combat them. Into that breach stepped J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI. Although the FBI's expanded role in World War II has been well documented, few have examined the crucial period before Pearl Harbor when the Bureau's powers secretly expanded to face the developing international emergency. Former FBI agent Raymond Batvinis now tells how the Bureau grew from a small law enforcement unit into America's first organized counter-espionage and counterintelligence service. Batvinis examines the FBI's emerging new roles during the two decades leading up to America's entry into World War II to show how it cooperated and competed with other federal agencies. He takes readers behind the scenes, as the State Department and Hoover fought fiercely over the control of counterintelligence, and tells how the agency combined its crime-fighting expertise with its new wiretapping authority to spy on foreign agents. Based on newly declassified documents and interviews with former agents, Batvinis's account reconstructs and greatly expands our understanding of the FBI's achievements and failures during this period. Among these were the Bureau's mishandling of the 1938 Rumrich/Griebl spy case, which Hoover slyly used to broaden his agency's powers; its cracking of the Duquesne Espionage Case in 1941, which enabled Hoover to boost public and congressional support to new heights; and its failure to understand the value of Soviet agent Walter Krivitsky, which slowed Bureau efforts to combat Soviet espionage inAmerica. In addition, Batvinis offers a new view of the relationship between the FBI and the military, cites the crucial contributions of British intelligence to the FBI's counter-intelligence education, and reveals the agency's ultra-secret role in mining financial records for the Treasury Department. He also reviews the early days of the top-secret Special Intelligence Service, which quietly dispatched FBI agents posing as businessmen to South America to spy on their governments. With an insider's knowledge and a storyteller's skill, Batvinis provides a pageturning history narrative that greatly revises our views of the FBI--and also resonates powerfully with our own post-9/11 world.
Main Description
As the world prepared for war in the 1930s, the United States discovered that it faced the real threat of foreign spies stealing military and industrial secrets-and that it had no established means to combat them. Into that breach stepped J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI. Although the FBIs expanded role in World War II has been well documented, few have examined the crucial period before Pearl Harbor when the Bureaus powers secretly expanded to face the developing international emergency. Former FBI agent Raymond Batvinis now tells how the Bureau grew from a small law enforcement unit into Americas first organized counterespionage and counterintelligence service.Batvinis examines the FBIs emerging new roles during the two decades leading up to Americas entry into World War II to show how it cooperated and competed with other federal agencies. He takes readers behind the scenes, as the State Department and Hoover fought fiercely over the control of counterintelligence, and tells how the agency combined its crime-fighting expertise with its new wiretapping authority to spy on foreign agents. Based on newly declassified documents and interviews with former agents, Batviniss account reconstructs and greatly expands our understanding of the FBIs achievements and failures during this period. Among these were the Bureaus mishandling of the 1938 Rumrich/Griebl spy case, which Hoover slyly used to broaden his agencys powers; its cracking of the Duquesne Espionage Case in 1941, which enabled Hoover to boost public and congressional support to new heights; and its failure to understand the value of Soviet agent Walter Krivitsky, which slowed Bureau efforts to combat Soviet espionage in America. In addition, Batvinis offers a new view of the relationship between the FBI and the military, cites the crucial contributions of British intelligence to the FBIs counterintelligence education, and reveals the agencys ultra-secret role in mining financial records for the Treasury Department. He also reviews the early days of the top-secret Special Intelligence Service, which quietly dispatched FBI agents posing as businessmen to South America to spy on their governments. With an insiders knowledge and a storytellers skill, Batvinis provides a page-turning history narrative that greatly revises our views of the FBI-and also resonates powerfully with our own post-9/11 world.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Rumrichp. 3
A Look Backp. 29
Controversy and Confusionp. 52
Interdepartmental Intelligence Conferencep. 69
Following the Moneyp. 98
Wires and Bugsp. 120
Opportunities Missedp. 135
Special Overseas Assignmentsp. 159
British Security Coordinationp. 186
Special Intelligence Servicep. 207
Ducasep. 226
Conclusionp. 257
Sebold's List of Abwehr Requirementsp. 261
Duquesne Ring Conspiratorsp. 263
Unindicted Duquesne Ring Coconspiratorsp. 265
Sentences of the Duquesne Ring Conspiratorsp. 267
Expenditures for Special Intelligence Service Operations, July 2, 1940-June 30, 1947p. 269
Notesp. 271
Selected Bibliographyp. 307
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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