Catalogue


Building a neighborly community : post-Cold War China, Japan, and Southeast Asia /
Daojiong Zha and Weixing Hu.
imprint
Manchester, UK : Manchester University Press ; Vancouver : Distributed exclusively in Canada by UBC Press, 2006.
description
xii, 259 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719070643 (hbk.), 9780719070648 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Manchester, UK : Manchester University Press ; Vancouver : Distributed exclusively in Canada by UBC Press, 2006.
isbn
0719070643 (hbk.)
9780719070648 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6101854
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 237-253) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Weixing Hu is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Hong Kong.
Summaries
Main Description
The inaugural East Asian summit (EAS) in December 2005 was applauded as a historic event in East Asian community building. Yet, since the 1997 Asian financial crisis, East Asian states have created one forum after another for regional cooperation. What difference can the EAS bring to regional community building? What explains the dynamics and prospects of East Asian community building? Building a neighborly community examines East Asia's path of moving toward a more institutionalized community through analyzing political and economic interface between China, Japan, and Southeast Asia in the post-Cold War era. It argues the interaction between power politics and functional cooperation has caused a unique trajectory for regional community building. The emerging neighborly community is fundamentally different from those in other parts of the world. It relies on consultation and consensus building at a level comfortable to everyone involved. Book jacket.
Main Description
Building a Neighborly Community explores the political economy of post-cold war East Asian co-operation by examining the history of intra-regional co-operation, against the background of China's rise and Japan's relative decline, both real and perceived. The book in particular examines how East Asian states have dealt with the South China Sea as a region-wide security challenge and the imperative for self-help after the 1997 economic crisis.
Main Description
Building a neighborly community explores the political economy of post-cold war East Asian co-operation by examining the history of intra-regional co-operation, against the background of China's rise and Japan's relative decline, both real and perceived. The book in particular examines how East Asian states have dealt with the South China Sea as a region-wide security challenge and the imperative for self-help after the 1997 economic crisis. The book builds on the explanatory strength of analytical eclecticism, and ultimately concludes that China, South Korea, Japan, and ASEAN states have aimed for constructing a neighbourly community. The fundamental differences between a neighborly community and the kind of community that has emerged in Europe and North America are that qualification for membership is not conditional, the process of routine interactions is itself one of reassurance, the aim of inter-state interactions is to foster acceptance of each other, and changes in a member's foreign policy behaviour are accepted.
Long Description
"Building a Neighborly Community" explores the political economy of post-cold war East Asian co-operation by examining the history of intra-regional co-operation, against the background of China' s rise and Japan' s relative decline, both real and perceived. The book in particular examines how East Asian states have dealt with the South China Sea as a region-wide security challenge and the imperative for self-help after the 1997 economic crisis.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Building a Neighbourly Community' explores the political economy of post-Cold War East Asian co-operation by examining the history of intra-regional co-operation.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vi
List of abbreviationsp. x
Map of East Asiap. xii
Introductionp. 1
East Asian community building in theoretical perspectivep. 30
China and Southeast Asiap. 55
Japan and Southeast Asiap. 84
Engaging China and Japan the 'ASEAN way'p. 108
Managing security challenges: the South China Seap. 142
Economic diplomacy and the ASEAN + 3 processp. 170
ASEAN and Sino-Japanese relationsp. 197
Conclusion: building a neighborly communityp. 222
Select bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 254
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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