Catalogue


Robert Penn Warren, critic /
Charlotte H. Beck.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2006.
description
x, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1572334746 (acid-free paper), 9781572334748
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2006.
isbn
1572334746 (acid-free paper)
9781572334748
catalogue key
6100255
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [173]-179) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
Despite the fact that Robert Penn Warren was one of the most prolific critics of the twentieth century, Charlotte H. Beck's Robert Penn Warren, Critic is the first thorough study of Warren as a literary critic in his own right. Part of the blame for this surprising omission lies with Warren himself, who tended to belittle his critical persona, considering himself a poet first, fiction writer second, and critic last. Although Warren was educated at Vanderbilt and befriended by the original New Critics, Warren created and honed his own critical method, often in striking opposition to that of the New Critics. Using a largely chronological approach,Charlotte Beck has carefully traced the evolution of Warren's criticism, focusing on seminal examples of the critical books, essays, and introductions that Warren produced over a period of almost seventy years. Her surprising conclusions often run counter to previous evaluations of Warren's criticism, especially to those that complacently link Warren to Cleanth Brooks, his lifelong friend and collaborator, and to New Criticism in general. Beck demonstrates that Warren consistently treats writers holistically, taking into account biographical as well as historical data, to account for their entire body of work, rather than focusing on a single literary text. Beck's analysis of Warren's criticism will appeal not only to scholars of American literature and Southern literary history but also will contribute to the contemporary resurgence of interest in Warren's writing, demonstrating that Warren belongs in the first rank of twentieth-century American critics.
Long Description
Despite the fact that Robert Penn Warren was one of the most prolific critics of the twentieth century, Charlotte H. Beck's Robert Penn Warren, Critic is the first thorough study of Warren as a literary critic in his own right. Part of the blame for this surprising omission lies with Warren himself, who tended to belittle his critical persona, considering himself a poet first, fiction writer second, and critic last. Although Warren was educated at Vanderbilt and befriended by the original New Critics, Warren created and honed his own critical method, often in striking opposition to that of the New Critics. Using a largely chronological approach, Charlotte Beck has carefully traced the evolution of Warren's criticism, focusing on seminal examples of the critical books, essays, and introductions that Warren produced over a period of almost seventy years. Her surprising conclusions often run counter to previous evaluations of Warren's criticism, especially to those that complacently link Warren to Cleanth Brooks, his lifelong friend and collaborator, and to New Criticism in general. Beck demonstrates that Warren consistently treats writers holistically, taking into account biographical as well as historical data, to account for their entire body of work, rather than focusing on a single literary text. Beck's analysis of Warren's criticism will appeal not only to scholars of American literature and Southern literary history but also will contribute to the contemporary resurgence of interest in Warren's writing, demonstrating that Warren belongs in the first rank of twentieth-century American critics.
Table of Contents
Robert Penn Warren, critic malgre luip. 1
Warren's criticism in the 1920s and 1930s : reviews, agrarian apologetics, and the new criticismp. 11
The 1940s : a decade of criticismp. 41
The 1950s and 1960s : Warren's criticism in transitionp. 81
The prolific 1970sp. 107
Epilogue : the 1980sp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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