Catalogue


The politics of war : race, class, and conflict in revolutionary Virginia /
Michael A. McDonnell.
imprint
Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c2007.
description
xviii, 544 p.
ISBN
0807831085 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807831083 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c2007.
isbn
0807831085 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807831083 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6100252
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
McDonnell uses the Revolution in Virginia to examine the political and social struggles of a revolutionary society at war--with itself as much as with Great Britain. He documents the numerous contests within Virginia over mobilizing for war--struggles between ordinary Virginians and patriot leaders, between the lower and middle classes, and between blacks and whites. From these conflicts emerged a republican polity rife with racial and class tensions. The Battle of Yorktown did not resolve Virginia's internal conflicts. With its insights into the mobilization of popular support, the exposure of social rifts, and the inversion of power relations, McDonnell's analysis is relevant to any society at war.
Flap Copy
McDonnell uses the Revolution in Virginia to examine the political and social struggles of a revolutionary society at war_with itself as much as with Great Britain. He documents the numerous contests within Virginia over mobilizing for war_struggles between ordinary Virginians and patriot leaders, between the lower and middle classes, and between blacks and whites. From these conflicts emerged a republican polity rife with racial and class tensions. The Battle of Yorktown did not resolve Virginia's internal conflicts. With its insights into the mobilization of popular support, the exposure of social rifts, and the inversion of power relations, McDonnell's analysis is relevant to any society at war.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-02-01:
In this chronological study, McDonnell (Univ. of Sydney) explores in some depth the tension between the elite and allegedly "plebian" citizens during the Revolutionary War. While venting most of the troublesome issues confronting wartime Virginians, the author concentrates on militia problems, particularly relating to recruitment and the draft. Other than the draft, the author is oblivious to important civil liberty issues, not the least being the arrests and trials for treason during late 1781 and early 1782. Antiwar dissension is overall neglected. There are some exaggerations, e.g., saying that tenant protests in the Northern Neck in 1776 put Virginia on the edge of civil war. McDonnell's repetitive treatments are wearisome; a topical approach would have made for more clarity. More could be said of the powerful, pervasive office of war commissioner. The book ignores the posturing and rivalries among the officer corps of both the militia and the Continentals, which might have shed light on the "politics of war." Summing Up: Optional. Upper-division undergraduates and above. H. M. Ward emeritus, University of Richmond
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A big book in every sense of the word. . . . Contribute[s] greatly to the social history of the Revolutionary War. . . . Our sense of what the Revolution was and was not is considerably better now than it was before McDonnell's substantial achievement." - William and Mary Quarterly
"A big book in every sense of the word. . . . Contribute[s] greatly to the social history of the Revolutionary War. . . . Our sense of what the Revolution was and was not is considerably better now than it was before McDonnell's substantial achievement." --William and Mary Quarterly
A must and delightful read for any serious student of the early Republic."Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State University"
A must and delightful read for any serious student of the early Republic.- Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State University
"[An] extensively researched, clearly written analysis. . . . Offers a blueprint for how historians should examine the attempts by various groups of Americans to acquire liberty and independence in the second half of the eighteenth century." - Common-place
"[An] extensively researched, clearly written analysis. . . . Offers a blueprint for how historians should examine the attempts by various groups of Americans to acquire liberty and independence in the second half of the eighteenth century." --Common-place
"[An] impressive work. . . . An extremely detailed picture of Virginia at war. . . . [A] deeply researched and radical new take on the War for Independence and the creation of the American Revolution." - Journal of American Studies
"[An] impressive work. . . . An extremely detailed picture of Virginia at war. . . . [A] deeply researched and radical new take on the War for Independence and the creation of the American Revolution." --Journal of American Studies
[A] powerful new interpretation of the American Revolution in Virginia.Marcus Rediker, University of Pittsburgh
[A] powerful new interpretation of the American Revolution in Virginia. -Marcus Rediker, University of Pittsburgh
"Explores in some depth the tension between the elite and allegedly 'plebian' citizens during the Revolutionary War." - CHOICE
"Explores in some depth the tension between the elite and allegedly 'plebian' citizens during the Revolutionary War." --CHOICE
"McDonnell places himself firmly in a historiographic tradition that stresses the 'history from the bottom up' in their telling of the American Revolution, while at the same time elegantly wedding his analysis to the social history of warfare. . . . McDonnell should be congratulated for his aggressive insistence on the importance of the experience of the war in the transformations of independent Virginia, and his work should stimulate future work on the social context of the politics of war in revolutionary America." - Historical Journal
"McDonnell places himself firmly in a historiographic tradition that stresses the 'history from the bottom up' in their telling of the American Revolution, while at the same time elegantly wedding his analysis to the social history of warfare. . . . McDonnell should be congratulated for his aggressive insistence on the importance of the experience of the war in the transformations of independent Virginia, and his work should stimulate future work on the social context of the politics of war in revolutionary America." -Historical Journal
"McDonnell places himself firmly in a historiographic tradition that stresses the 'history from the bottom up' in their telling of the American Revolution, while at the same time elegantly wedding his analysis to the social history of warfare. . . . McDonnell should be congratulated for his aggressive insistence on the importance of the experience of the war in the transformations of independent Virginia, and his work should stimulate future work on the social context of the politics of war in revolutionary America." '”Historical Journal
"McDonnell's impressive book very powerfully sweeps away old myths and presents a powerful case of a Virginia riven by class and social divisions during the Revolutionary War and moving into the postwar era with a greater sense of trepidation than triumph. . . . A model of historical scholarship -- a work deeply researched, clearly written, and effectively argued, that adds significantly to our picture of Virginia during the Revolution." - Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"McDonnell's impressive book very powerfully sweeps away old myths and presents a powerful case of a Virginia riven by class and social divisions during the Revolutionary War and moving into the postwar era with a greater sense of trepidation than triumph. . . . A model of historical scholarship -- a work deeply researched, clearly written, and effectively argued, that adds significantly to our picture of Virginia during the Revolution." -Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"McDonnell's impressive book very powerfully sweeps away old myths and presents a powerful case of a Virginia riven by class and social divisions during the Revolutionary War and moving into the postwar era with a greater sense of trepidation than triumph. . . . A model of historical scholarship '” a work deeply researched, clearly written, and effectively argued, that adds significantly to our picture of Virginia during the Revolution." -Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"McDonnell's impressive book very powerfully sweeps away old myths and presents a powerful case of a Virginia riven by class and social divisions during the Revolutionary War and moving into the postwar era with a greater sense of trepidation than triumph. . . . A model of historical scholarship '” a work deeply researched, clearly written, and effectively argued, that adds significantly to our picture of Virginia during the Revolution." '”Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"McDonnell's impressive research allows him to give a fully rounded story of the multifaceted conflict within Virginia." - Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"McDonnell's impressive research allows him to give a fully rounded story of the multifaceted conflict within Virginia." --Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"One of the more important recent additions to American colonial and Revolutionary historiography." - Journal of the Early Republic
"One of the more important recent additions to American colonial and Revolutionary historiography." --Journal of the Early Republic
[P]ainstaking research and keen insights.Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis
[P]ainstaking research and keen insights. -Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis
"Provides new insights into Virginia society and its response to wartime mobilization. For scholars of the American Revolution and graduate students, this work provides a wealth of information on Revolutionary Virginia and sets a high standard in historical research." - North Carolina Historical Review
"Provides new insights into Virginia society and its response to wartime mobilization. For scholars of the American Revolution and graduate students, this work provides a wealth of information on Revolutionary Virginia and sets a high standard in historical research." --North Carolina Historical Review
"Required reading for students of the American Revolution." - The Historian
"Required reading for students of the American Revolution." --The Historian
"Specialists will appreciate McDonnell's mastery of the historiography of Virginia. But they and others will also recognise and applaud his determination to recall from the past ###individual people# forced to cope with the experience of war. . . . Wonderfully told." - Australian Book Review
"Specialists will appreciate McDonnell's mastery of the historiography of Virginia. But they and others will also recognise and applaud his determination to recall from the past ###individual people# forced to cope with the experience of war. . . . Wonderfully told." --Australian Book Review
"Students of the militia's history in America will find this study of great interest." - Journal of America's Military Past
"Students of the militia's history in America will find this study of great interest." -Journal of America's Military Past
"Successfully draws from a specific issue conclusions about the nature of the War of Independence and how political conflicts stirred up by the war lingered after the fighting ended. . . . A valuable addition to American Revolutionary War historiography. . . . McDonnell joins a growing list of historians whose analyses of early American societies at war tell us much about class, race, and conceptions of liberty in the American Revolution." - Journal of Military History
"Successfully draws from a specific issue conclusions about the nature of the War of Independence and how political conflicts stirred up by the war lingered after the fighting ended. . . . A valuable addition to American Revolutionary War historiography. . . . McDonnell joins a growing list of historians whose analyses of early American societies at war tell us much about class, race, and conceptions of liberty in the American Revolution." --Journal of Military History
"The fullest account yet of the struggles among Virginians over the Revolution. . . . McDonnell offers a new and intriguing perspective on this major issue." - Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
"The fullest account yet of the struggles among Virginians over the Revolution. . . . McDonnell offers a new and intriguing perspective on this major issue." --Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
"There is much that is fresh and valuable in this book." - American Historical Review
"There is much that is fresh and valuable in this book." --American Historical Review
"This book . . . demands careful reading by all who write or care about eighteenth-century Virginia." - The Journal of American History
"This book . . . demands careful reading by all who write or care about eighteenth-century Virginia." --The Journal of American History
YA? powerful new interpretation of the American Revolution in Virginia.Marcus Rediker, University of Pittsburgh
YP'ainstaking research and keen insights.Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2008
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Summaries
Long Description
War often unites a society behind a common cause, but the notion of diverse populations all rallying together to fight on the same side disguises the complex social forces that come into play in the midst of perceived unity.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
List of Mapsp. xv
Abbreviations and Short Titlesp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
The Ebullition of Patriotism
Mustering Patriotism: The Problem of Popular Mobilization, 1774-1775p. 19
Those Who Aim at Too Much: The Revolution Beginsp. 49
Checking Wild Irregular Sallies: Patriot Leaders Reassert Controlp. 75
Movements for Independence
Plebeian Infamy: The Minutemen and Their Worldp. 105
The Burning of Norfolk: Patriot Leaders Become Reluctant Revolutionariesp. 135
The Spirit of Levelling: Movements for Independence, January-May 1776p. 175
Revolutionary Settlement: Creating a New Governmentp. 216
The Limits of Allegiance
Fit for Common Service? Mobilization Problems, 1776-1777p. 247
The Politics of Lower-Class Draft Resistance, 1777-1778p. 281
Paralysis and Division, 1778-1780p. 315
Revolution of Fools and Knaves
Revolutionary Demands: War Comes to the Southp. 367
Asserting Fundamental Rights: Militia Service and Resistance, 1781p. 398
Defeatp. 435
Toward the New Republic: The Revolutionary Legacy of the War for Independencep. 479
Indexp. 529
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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