Catalogue


Space and the 'march of mind' : literature and the physical sciences in Britain, 1815-1850 /
Alice Jenkins
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007
description
257 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0199209928 (hbk.), 9780199209927 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007
isbn
0199209928 (hbk.)
9780199209927 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6099841
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [235]-250) and index
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An estimable book."- Studies in English Literature 1500-1900
"An estimable book."- Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 "An impressive range of historical data...Thanks to this pathbreaking study, we can almost certainly expect to see further analyses of so-called "hard sciences" in relation to literary history."-- Philological Quarterly
"An estimable book."-Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 "An impressive range of historical data...Thanks to this pathbreaking study, we can almost certainly expect to see further analyses of so-called "hard sciences" in relation to literary history."--Philological Quarterly
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Discussing the idea of space in the first half of the 19th century, this book uses contemporary poetry, essays, and fiction as well as scientific papers, textbooks, and journalism to give an account of 19th-century literature's relationship with science.
Long Description
This book is about the idea of space in the first half of the nineteenth century. It uses contemporary poetry, essays, and fiction as well as scientific papers, textbooks, and journalism to give a new account of nineteenth-century literature's relationship with science. In particular it brings the physical sciences - physics and chemistry - more accessibly and fully into the arena of literary criticism than has been the case until now.Writers whose work is discussed in this book include many who will be familiar to a literary audience (including Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Hazlitt), some well-known in the history of science (including Faraday, Herschel, and Whewell), and a raft of lesser-known figures. Alice Jenkins draws a new map of the interactions between literature and science in the first half of the nineteenth century, showing how both disciplines were wrestling with the same central political and intellectual concerns- regulating access to knowledge, organising knowledge in productive ways, and formulating the relationships of old and new knowledges.Space has become a subject of enormous critical interest in literary and cultural studies. Space and the 'March of Mind' gives a wide-ranging account of how early nineteenth-century writers thought about - and thought with - space. Burgeoning mass access to print culture combined with rapid scientific development to create a crisis in managing knowledge. Contemporary writers tried to solve this crisis by rethinking the nature of space. Writers in all genres and disciplines,from all points on the political spectrum, returned again and again to ideas and images of space when they needed to set up or dismantle boundaries in the intellectual realm, and when they wanted to talk about what kinds of knowledge certain groups of readers wanted, needed, or deserved. This book provides a rich newpicture of the early nineteenth century's understanding of its own culture.
Main Description
This book is about the idea of space in the first half of the nineteenth century. It uses contemporary poetry, essays, and fiction as well as scientific papers, textbooks, and journalism to give a new account of nineteenth-century literature's relationship with science. In particular it brings the physical sciences--physics and chemistry--more accessibly and fully into the arena of literary criticism than has been the case until now. Writers whose work is discussed in this book include many who will be familiar to a literary audience (including Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Hazlitt), some well-known in the history of science (including Faraday, Herschel, and Whewell), and a raft of lesser-known figures. Alice Jenkins draws a new map of the interactions between literature and science in the first half of the nineteenth century, showing how both disciplines were wrestling with the same central political and intellectual concerns--regulating access to knowledge, organizing knowledge in productive ways, and formulating the relationships of old and new knowledges. Space has become a subject of enormous critical interest in literary and cultural studies.Space and the 'March of Mind'gives a wide-ranging account of how early nineteenth-century writers thought about--and thoughtwith--space. Burgeoning mass access to print culture combined with rapid scientific development to create a crisis in managing knowledge. Contemporary writers tried to solve this crisis by rethinking the nature of space. Writers in all genres and disciplines, from all points on the political spectrum, returned again and again to ideas and images of space when they needed to set up or dismantle boundaries in the intellectual realm, and when they wanted to talk about what kinds of knowledge certain groups of readers wanted, needed, or deserved. This book provides a rich new picture of the early nineteenth century's understanding of its own culture.
Table of Contents
Culture as nature : landscape metaphors and access to the world of learningp. 29
Organizing the space of knowledgep. 55
Disciplinary boundaries and border disputesp. 80
Space and the languages of sciencep. 113
Aspiring to the abstract : pure space and geometryp. 141
Bodies in space : ether, light, and the beginnings of the fieldp. 176
Chaos, the void, and poetryp. 208
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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