Catalogue


Real words : language and system in Hegel /
Jeffrey Reid.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2007.
description
xvi, 175 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802091725, 9780802091727
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2007.
isbn
0802091725
9780802091727
catalogue key
6098860
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Wilson, Joyce. 2008/07/23.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [159]-169) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-09-01:
Reid (Univ. of Ottawa) offers here a collection of essays, most previously published. Real Words does not consist of a linear argument, but instead develops several points in various contexts. Its points are compressed, and so not fully articulated. Reid interprets Hegel as arguing that language is the middle term between mind and world. Language connects thought and being, such that the signifier and the signified are identical in language. The meanings of words are objective, rather than the subjective and arbitrary assertions of individuals. The content of philosophy is language, and so philosophy is always the philosophy of something, such as art, history, mind, or nature. Philosophy is the unification of thought and world in language as found in the various disciplines. Nature becomes part of Hegel's system as mediated through the findings of the sciences, for example, and it is through written accounts that history is appropriated. Reid denies that the world has a dialectical development. What dialectically develops is language as it connects thought and world. Reid explicates Hegel's claims, but he does not evaluate them. Summing Up: Optional. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. J. M. Fritzman Lewis and Clark College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2007
Choice, September 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
There exists a very particular grasp of the relation between language and objectivity in the work of G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831), one that rejects the idea of truth as the reflection between words and what they represent. Jeffrey Reid's Real Wordsis an examination of Hegel's notion of scientific language (i.e. the language of his system) and its implications to a type of discourse that is itself true objectivity. Hegel sees scientific logos as real, actual, and true, where there is no distance between signifier and signified and where the word is the effective thing. The words of Hegel's system are meant to be objective: they 'take place' in the world; they are not the arbitrary constructions of the individual philosopher. This concept of language is only possible through the idea of content, real words that actually embody the truth of nature, history, law, art and philosophy itself. Real Wordspresents an original way of understanding one of the most important philosophers in the Western tradition.
Main Description
There exists a very particular grasp of the relation between language and objectivity in the work of G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831), one that rejects the idea of truth as the reflection between words and what they represent.Jeffrey Reid's Real Words is an examination of Hegel's notion of scientific language (i.e. the language of his system) and its implications to a type of discourse that is itself true objectivity. Hegel sees scientific logos as real, actual, and true, where there is no distance between signifier and signified and where the word is the effective thing. The words of Hegel's system are meant to be objective: they 'take place' in the world; they are not the arbitrary constructions of the individual philosopher. This concept of language is only possible through the idea of content, real words that actually embody the truth of nature, history, law, art and philosophy itself.Real Words presents an original way of understanding one of the most important philosophers in the Western tradition.
Table of Contents
The objective discourse of sciencep. 3
The ontological grasp of judgmentp. 18
Why Hegel didn't join the 'Kant-Klub' : reason and speculative discoursep. 29
The fiery crucible, Yorick's skull, and leprosy in the sky : the language of nature (with a concluding unscientific postscriptum)p. 40
Presenting the past : Hegel's epistemological historiographyp. 58
The state university : the University of Berlin and its founding contradictionsp. 71
Music and monosyllables : the language of pleasure and necessityp. 85
Hegel's critique of Solger : the problem of scientific communicationp. 96
On Schleiermacher and postmodernityp. 104
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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