Catalogue


The literature of jealousy in the age of Cervantes /
Steven Wagschal.
imprint
Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, 2006.
description
x, 220 p. : ill.
ISBN
082621696X (hard cover : alk. paper), 9780826216960 (hard cover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, 2006.
isbn
082621696X (hard cover : alk. paper)
9780826216960 (hard cover : alk. paper)
contents note
Jealousy and epistemology in Lope de Vega's "Honor plays" -- Women, jealousy, and power -- Representing dramatic jealousy : from comic to tragic -- Religion, race, and ethnicity in Cervantes's Jealous old man from Extremadura -- Cervantes's virtuous jealousy -- Myth and the fractured "I" in Góngora -- Góngora on the beautiful and the sublime.
catalogue key
6095130
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-09-01:
This engaging study of early modern Spanish literature built around the theme of jealousy scrutinizes plays, narrative works, and poetry. Wagschal (Indiana Univ.) wants to show both the prevalence of the jealousy motif and its variations within the literary traditions of the period. He notes that as early as 1611 Sebastian de Covarrubias observed that jealousy is a key ingredient of writing in Spain and Italy. Using an admirable number of sources, old and new, Wagschal offers what could be termed a poetics of jealousy, which serves to anchor his readings of individual texts. These texts include selected plays of Lope de Vega (including Arminda celosa); works by Cervantes, among them El celoso extremeno and La casa de los cellos; and poems by Luis de Gongora, e.g., the cancion "Que de envidiosos montes levantados." Through analyses structured around a general topic, Wagschal is able to combine aesthetics, ethics, ideology, and psychology. Jealousy in its multiple manifestations also reflects the competitive mind-set of baroque artists. The links among the texts are often subtle, but the commentaries are consistently perceptive and impressively interdisciplinary. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. E. H. Friedman Vanderbilt University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"His readings are always careful, insightful, and stimulating. . . . His study should be of interest to anyone who is concerned with the representation of emotions in literature." -Frederick de Armas, author of Cervantes, Raphael, and the Classics
“His readings are always careful, insightful, and stimulating. . . . His study should be of interest to anyone who is concerned with the representation of emotions in literature.” -Frederick de Armas, author of Cervantes, Raphael, and the Classics
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2007
Choice, September 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Frequent and complex representations of jealousy in early modern Spanish literature offer symbolically rich and often contradictory images. Steven Wagschal examines these occurrences by illuminating the theme of jealousy in the plays of Lope de Vega, the prose of Miguel de Cervantes, and the complex poetry of Luis de GÓngora. Noting the prevalence of this emotion in their work, he reveals what jealousy offered these writers at a time when Spain was beginning its long decline. Wagschal examines jealousy not only in canonical texts-The Jealous Old Man from Extremadura, The Commanders of Cordoba-but also in less-studied writings such as Lope de Vega'sJealous ArmindaandIn Love but Discreetand GÓngora's "What of the Tall Envious Mountains." Through close analysis of numerous works, read in relation to one another, he demonstrates how the rhetorical elaboration of jealousy is linked to the ideological makeup of the texts-complicating issues of race, class, gender, morality, epistemology, and aesthetics-and proposes that the theme of jealousy offered a means for working through political and cultural problems involving power. Grounding his study in the work of thinkers ranging from Vives and Descartes to Freud and DeSousa, Wagschal also draws on classical antiquity to unravel myths that impinge upon the texts he considers. By showing that the greatest hyperbole of each of these writers is a representation of jealousy, he calls for a reconsideration of an era's literary giants, arguing not only for a reinterpretation of settled views on Cervantes but also for a reconsideration of GÓngora's role in the development of modern European aesthetics. With its fresh insights into the interrelationships among literature, art, and society, Wagschal's study offers background theory for analyzing the emotions in literature and is the first book to treat an emotion in any national literature from the perspective of contemporary philosophy of mind. With its cogent insights into the jealous mind, it raises issues relevant both to the early modern period and to our contemporary world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Frequent and complex representations of jealousy in early modern Spanish literature offer symbolically rich and often contradictory images. This work examines these occurrences by illuminating the theme of jealousy in the plays of Lope de Vega, the prose of Miguel de Cervantes, and the complex poetry of Luis de Gongora.
Library of Congress Summary
"Explores the theme of jealousy in early modern Spanish literature through the works of Lope de Vega, Cervantes, and Góngora. Using the philosophical frameworks of Vives, Descartes, Freud, and DeSousa, Wagschal proposes that the theme of jealousy offered a means for working through political and cultural problems involving power"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Frequent and complex representations of jealousy in early modern Spanish literature offer symbolically rich and often contradictory images. Steven Wagschal examines these occurrences by illuminating the theme of jealousy in the plays of Lope de Vega, the prose of Miguel de Cervantes, and the complex poetry of Luis de G ngora. Noting the prevalence of this emotion in their work, he reveals what jealousy offered these writers at a time when Spain was beginning its long decline. Wagschal examines jealousy not only in canonical texts- The Jealous Old Man from Extremadura, The Commanders of Cordoba-but also in less-studied writings such as Lope de Vega’s Jealous Armindaand In Love but Discreetand G ngora’s “What of the Tall Envious Mountains.” Through close analysis of numerous works, read in relation to one another, he demonstrates how the rhetorical elaboration of jealousy is linked to the ideological makeup of the texts-complicating issues of race, class, gender, morality, epistemology, and aesthetics-and proposes that the theme of jealousy offered a means for working through political and cultural problems involving power. Grounding his study in the work of thinkers ranging from Vives and Descartes to Freud and DeSousa, Wagschal also draws on classical antiquity to unravel myths that impinge upon the texts he considers. By showing that the greatest hyperbole of each of these writers is a representation of jealousy, he calls for a reconsideration of an era’s literary giants, arguing not only for a reinterpretation of settled views on Cervantes but also for a reconsideration of G ngora’s role in the development of modern European aesthetics. With its fresh insights into the interrelationships among literature, art, and society, Wagschal’s study offers background theory for analyzing the emotions in literature and is the first book to treat an emotion in any national literature from the perspective of contemporary philosophy of mind. With its cogent insights into the jealous mind, it raises issues relevant both to the early modern period and to our contemporary world.
Main Description
Frequent and complex representations of jealousy in early modern Spanish literature offer symbolically rich and often contradictory images. Steven Wagschal examines these occurrences by illuminating the theme of jealousy in the plays of Lope de Vega, the prose of Miguel de Cervantes, and the complex poetry of Luis de Góngora. Noting the prevalence of this emotion in their work, he reveals what jealousy offered these writers at a time when Spain was beginning its long decline. Wagschal examines jealousy not only in canonical texts- The Jealous Old Man from Extremadura, The Commanders of Cordoba-but also in less-studied writings such as Lope de Vega's Jealous Armindaand In Love but Discreetand Góngora's "What of the Tall Envious Mountains." Through close analysis of numerous works, read in relation to one another, he demonstrates how the rhetorical elaboration of jealousy is linked to the ideological makeup of the texts-complicating issues of race, class, gender, morality, epistemology, and aesthetics-and proposes that the theme of jealousy offered a means for working through political and cultural problems involving power. Grounding his study in the work of thinkers ranging from Vives and Descartes to Freud and DeSousa, Wagschal also draws on classical antiquity to unravel myths that impinge upon the texts he considers. By showing that the greatest hyperbole of each of these writers is a representation of jealousy, he calls for a reconsideration of an era's literary giants, arguing not only for a reinterpretation of settled views on Cervantes but also for a reconsideration of Góngora's role in the development of modern European aesthetics. With its fresh insights into the interrelationships among literature, art, and society, Wagschal's study offers background theory for analyzing the emotions in literature and is the first book to treat an emotion in any national literature from the perspective of contemporary philosophy of mind. With its cogent insights into the jealous mind, it raises issues relevant both to the early modern period and to our contemporary world.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction Understanding Jealousiesp. 1
Jealousy and Epistemology in Lope de Vega's "Honor Plays"p. 22
Women, Jealousy, and Powerp. 50
Representing Dramatic Jealousy: From Comic to Tragicp. 75
Religion, Race, and Ethnicity in Cervantes's: Jealous Old Man from Extremadurap. 98
Cervantes's Virtuous Jealousyp. 121
Myth and the Fractured "I" in Gongorap. 136
Gongora on the Beautiful and the Sublimep. 157
Conclusion: A Culture of Jealousyp. 188
Works Citedp. 193
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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