Catalogue


The art of the start : the time-tested, battle-hardened guide for anyone starting anything /
Guy Kawasaki.
imprint
New York : Portfolio, 2004.
description
xii, 226 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1591840562
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Portfolio, 2004.
isbn
1591840562
catalogue key
6092935
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
Read Me First The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not ?Eureka!? (I found it!) but ?That's funny....' ?Isaac Asimov There are many ways to describe the ebb and flow, yin and yang, bubble-blowing and bubble-bursting phases of business cycles. Here's another one: microscopes and telescopes. In the microscope phase, there's a cry for level-headed thinking, a return to fundamentals, and going ?back to basics.' Experts magnify every detail, line item, and expenditure, and then demand full-blown forecasts, protracted market research, and all-encompassing competitive analysis.In the telescope phase, entrepreneurs bring the future closer. They dream up ?the next big thing,? change the world, and make late-adopters eat their dust. Lots of money is wasted, but some crazy ideas do stick, and the world moves forward. When telescopes work, everyone is an astronomer, and the world is full of stars. When they don't, everyone whips out their microscopes, and the world is full of flaws. The reality is that you need both microscopes and telescopes to achieve success. The problem is that this means gathering information that is spread among hundreds of books, magazines, and conferences. It also means talking to dozens of experts and professionals'if you can get, and afford, an audience. You could spend all your time learning and not doing. And doing, not learning to do, is the essence of entrepreneurship. The Art of the Startalleviates this pain. My goal is to help you use your knowledge, love, and determination to create something great without getting bogged down in theory and unnecessary details. My presumption is that your goal is to change the world'not study it. If your attitude is ?Cut the crap and just tell me what I need to do,? you've come to the right place. You might be wondering, Who, exactly, is ?you? The reality is that ?entrepreneur? is not a job title. It is the state of mindof people who want to alter the future. (It certainly isn't limited to Silicon Valley types seeking venture capital.) Hence, this book is for people in a wide range of startup endeavors: ? guys and gals in garages creating the next great company ? brave souls in established companies bringing new products and services to market ? saints starting schools, churches, and not-for-profits Great companies. Great divisions. Great schools. Great churches. Great not-for-profits. When it comes to the fundamentals of starting up, they are more alike than they are different. The key to their success is to survive the microscope tasks while bringing the future closer. Let's get started. Guy Kawasaki Palo Alto, California Kawasaki@garage.com CHAPTER 1 The Art of Starting Everyone should carefully observe which way his heart draws him, and then choose that way with all his strength. ?Hasidic saying GIST (GREAT IDEAS FOR STARTING THINGS) I use a top-ten list format for all my speeches, and I would love to begin this book with a top-ten list of the most important things an entrepreneur must accomplish. However, there aren't ten'there are only five: 1. MAKE MEANING (inspired by John Doerr). The best reason to start an organization is to make meaning'to create a product or service that makes the world a better place. So your first task is to decide how you can make meaning. 2. MAKE MANTRA. Forget mission statements; they're long, boring, and irrelevant. No one can ever remember them'much less implement them. Instead, take your meaning and make a mantra out of it. This will set your entire team on the right course. 3. GET GOING. Start creating and delivering your product or service. Think soldering irons, compilers, hammers, saw
First Chapter
Read Me First

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not ôEureka!ö (I found it!) but ôThatÆs funny....ö
ùIsaac Asimov

There are many ways to describe the ebb and flow, yin and yang, bubble-blowing and bubble-bursting phases of business cycles. HereÆs another one: microscopes and telescopes. In the microscope phase, thereÆs a cry for level-headed thinking, a return to fundamentals, and going ôback to basics.ö Experts magnify every detail, line item, and expenditure, and then demand full-blown forecasts, protracted market research, and all-encompassing competitive analysis.

In the telescope phase, entrepreneurs bring the future closer. They dream up ôthe next big thing,ö change the world, and make late-adopters eat their dust. Lots of money is wasted, but some crazy ideas do stick, and the world moves forward.

When telescopes work, everyone is an astronomer, and the world is full of stars. When they donÆt, everyone whips out their microscopes, and the world is full of flaws. The reality is that you need both microscopes and telescopes to achieve success.

The problem is that this means gathering information that is spread among hundreds of books, magazines, and conferences. It also means talking to dozens of experts and professionalsùif you can get, and afford, an audience. You could spend all your time learning and not doing. And doing, not learning to do, is the essence of entrepreneurship.

The Art of the Start alleviates this pain. My goal is to help you use your knowledge, love, and determination to create something great without getting bogged down in theory and unnecessary details. My presumption is that your goal is to change the worldùnot study it. If your attitude is ôCut the crap and just tell me what I need to do,ö youÆve come to the right place.

You might be wondering, Who, exactly, is ôyouö? The reality is that ôentrepreneurö is not a job title. It is the state of mind of people who want to alter the future. (It certainly isnÆt limited to Silicon Valley types seeking venture capital.) Hence, this book is for people in a wide range of startup endeavors:

ò guys and gals in garages creating the next great company
ò brave souls in established companies bringing new products and services to market
ò saints starting schools, churches, and not-for-profits

Great companies. Great divisions. Great schools. Great churches. Great not-for-profits. When it comes to the fundamentals of starting up, they are more alike than they are different. The key to their success is to survive the microscope tasks while bringing the future closer. LetÆs get started.

Guy Kawasaki
Palo Alto, California
Kawasaki@garage.com

CHAPTER 1
The Art of Starting

Everyone should carefully observe which way his heart draws him, and then choose that way with all his strength.
ùHasidic saying

GIST (GREAT IDEAS FOR STARTING THINGS)

I use a top-ten list format for all my speeches, and I would love to begin this book with a top-ten list of the most important things an entrepreneur must accomplish. However, there arenÆt tenùthere are only five:

1. MAKE MEANING (inspired by John Doerr). The best reason to start an organization is to make meaningùto create a product or service that makes the world a better place. So your first task is to decide how you can make meaning.
2. MAKE MANTRA. Forget mission statements; theyÆre long, boring, and irrelevant. No one can ever remember themùmuch less implement them. Instead, take your meaning and make a mantra out of it. This will set your entire team on the right course.
3. GET GOING. Start creating and delivering your product or service. Think soldering irons, compilers, hammers, saws, and AutoCADùwhatever tools you use to build products and services. DonÆt focus on pitching, writing, and planning.
4. DEFINE YOUR BUSINESS MODEL. No matter what kind of organization youÆre starting, you have to figure out a way to make money. The greatest idea, technology, product, or service is short-lived without a sustainable business model.
5. WEAVE A MAT (MILESTONES, ASSUMPTIONS, AND TASKS). The final step is to compile three lists: (a) major milestones you need to meet; (b) assumptions that are built into your business model; and (c) tasks you need to accomplish to create an organization. This will enforce discipline and keep your organization on track when all hell breaks looseùand all hell will break loose.

MAKE MEANING
I have never thought of writing for reputation and honor. What I have in my heart must come out; that is the reason why I compose.
ùLudwig van Beethoven

Many books about entrepreneurship begin with a rigorous process of self-examination, asking you to determine if you are truly up to the task of starting an organization. Some typical examples are

ò Can you work long hours at low wages?
ò Can you deal with rejection after rejection?
ò Can you handle the responsibility of dozens of employees?

The truth is, it is impossible to answer questions like this in advance, and they ultimately serve no purpose. On the one hand, talk and bravado are cheap. Saying youÆre willing to do something doesnÆt mean that you will do it.

On the other hand, realizing that you have doubt and trepidation doesnÆt mean you wonÆt build a great organization. How you answer these questions now has little predictive power regarding what youÆll actually do when you get caught up in a great idea.

The truth is that no one really knows if he* is an entrepreneur until he becomes oneùand sometimes not even then. There really is only one question you should ask yourself before starting any new venture:

Do I want to make meaning?

Meaning is not about money, power, or prestige. ItÆs not even about creating a fun place to work. Among the meanings of ômeaningö are to

ò Make the world a better place.
ò Increase the quality of life.
ò Right a terrible wrong.
ò Prevent the end of something good.

Goals such as these are a tremendous advantage as you travel down the difficult path ahead. If you answer this question in the negative, you may still be successful, but it will be harder to become so because making meaning is the most powerful motivator there is.

ItÆs taken me twenty years to come to this understanding.

In 1983, when I started in the Macintosh Division of Apple Computer, beating IBM was our reason for existence. We wanted to send IBM back to the typewriter business holding its Selectric typewriter balls.

In 1987, our reason for existence became beating Windows and Microsoft. We wanted to crush Microsoft and force Bill Gates to get a job flipping fish at the Pike Place Market.

In 2004, I am a managing director in an early-stage venture capital firm called Garage Technology Ventures. I want to enable people to create great products, build great companies, and change the world.

The causation of great organizations is the desire to make meaning. Having that desire doesnÆt guarantee that youÆll succeed, but it does mean that if you fail, at least you failed doing something worthwhile.

MAKE MANTRA
Close your eyes and think about how you will serve your customers. What kind of meaning do you see your organization making? Most people refer to this as the ôWhyö or mission statement of an organization.

Crafting a mission statement is usually one of the first steps entrepreneurs undertake. Unfortunately, this process is usually a painful and frustrating experience that results in exceptional mediocrity. This is almost inevitable when a large number of people are commissioned to craft something designed to make an even larger number of people (employees, shareholders, customers, and partners) happy.

The fundamental shortcoming of most mission statements is that everyone expects them to be highfalutin and all-encompassing. The result is a long, boring, commonplace, and pointless joke.* In The Mission Statement Book, Jeffrey Abrams provides 301 examples of mission statements that demonstrate that companies are all writing the same mediocre stuff. To wit, this is a partial list of the frequency with which mission statements in AbramsÆs sample contained the same words:

ò Bestù94
ò Communitiesù97
ò Customersù211
ò Excellenceù77
ò Leaderù106
ò Qualityù169*

Fortune (or Forbes, in my case) favors the bold, so IÆll give you some advice that will make life easy for you: Postpone writing your mission statement. You can come up with it later when youÆre successful and have lots of time and money to waste. (If youÆre not successful, it wonÆt matter that you didnÆt develop one.)

Instead of a mission statement and all the baggage that comes with it, craft a mantra for your organization. The definition of mantra is

A sacred verbal formula repeated in prayer, meditation, or incantation, such as an invocation of a god, a magic spell, or a syllable or portion of scripture containing mystical potentialities.å

What a great thing a mantra is! How many mission statements evoke such power and emotion?

The beauty of a mantra is that everyone expects it to be short and sweet. (Arguably, the worldÆs shortest mantra is the single Hindi word Om.) You may never have to write your mantra down, publish it in your annual report, or print it on posters. Indeed, if you do have to ôenforceö your mantra in these ways, itÆs not the right mantra.

Following are five examples that illustrate the power of a good mantra:

ò Authentic athletic performance (Nike).ç
ò Fun family entertainment (Disney).?
ò Rewarding everyday moments (Starbucks).

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-07-26:
Kawasaki (Rules for Revolutionaries) draws upon his dual background as an evangelist for Apple's Macintosh computer and as a Silicon Valley venture capitalist in this how-to for launching any type of business project. Each chapter begins with "GIST" ("great ideas for starting things"), covering a variety of facets to consider, from identifying your customer base and writing a business plan to establishing partnerships and building brand identity. Minichapters zero in on particular jobs that will need doing, while FAQ sections address the questions readers are most likely to have: Kawasaki covers the basics in an effectively casual tone. Much of the advice, however, consists of generic banalities-start your company's name with a letter that comes early in the alphabet, use big type in presentation slides for older businessmen with declining eyesight, and avoid writing e-mails in all capital letters-that can be found in any mediocre guide. Fortunately, Kawasaki does rise to the occasion here and there. He goes into great detail when it comes to raising capital and offers effective methods for sorting through the nonsense associated with interviewing prospective employees. (Sept. 9) Forecast: Drawn in part from readers of the Forbes column from which the book takes its title, Kawasaki's fan base will seek this one out (and overlook the weaker sections to get to the usable nuggets). (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-11-01:
Kawasaki has been a Silicon Valley fixture since he helped put Apple Computer Company on the map. Since then, he has started a successful venture capital company and written seven books (e.g., Rules for Revolutionaries). His newest work addresses entrepreneurs who want to grow beyond being a company of one as well as innovators who work for large companies. Kawasaki writes in a conversational style that references his own life experience and sources as divergent as Peter Drucker and Seth Godin. The result is a handbook that has lots of useful information, though it will cause most would-be start-up artists to think twice about ever approaching a venture capitalist. It will also inspire people with great ideas to think hard about building a solid business with real cash flow. Unfortunately, the book seems to be written around the needs of technology start-ups and is not quite as useful for traditional businesses. Therefore, only public libraries with a vast business collection should add, but business school libraries should consider.-Stephen Turner, Turner & Assocs., San Francisco (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A successful entrepreneur requires three things: a garage, an idea, and this book--Guy's irrepressible guide to the raw essentials of life in a young company. I wish we could post all this information on Sequoia Capital's Web site because it would make our jobs much easier." --Michael Moritz, Sequoia Capital "When God made the universe, He took Guy's advice and started small and put his whole heart into it. Okay, not everything turned out perfect, but as The Art of the Start makes clear, there are no guarantees, only great opportunities. Read this book and then go do something wonderful." --Geoffrey Moore, author of Crossing the Chasm "This is a delightful, complete, and consummately practical entrepreneur's handbook--quintessential Kawasaki. Every person who wants to start a business should read it. And read the footnote on page eight. There's more good stuff in here, but this alone is worth the price of the book." --Clayton Christensen, author of The Innovator's Dilemma and The Innovator's Solution "I have built my business into an internationally famous brand, and yet after reading this book, I have this nearly uncontrollable urge to chuck my whole business and start all over again. Guy's book revealed so many things I had never even suspected and shattered so many of my illusions, that it read like a novel. I would love to be the bank for the people who read this book." --Jay Conrad Levinson, author of the Guerrilla Marketing series of books "As useful for the next great not-for-profit as for the next great VC-funded startup. Anyone trying to change the world should read The Art of the Start . I wish it had been around when I started Teach for America." --Wendy Kopp, president and founder of Teach for America
"A successful entrepreneur requires three things: a garage, an idea, and this book-Guy's irrepressible guide to the raw essentials of life in a young company. I wish we could post all this information on Sequoia Capital's Web site because it would make our jobs much easier." -Michael Moritz, Sequoia Capital "When God made the universe, He took Guy's advice and started small and put his whole heart into it. Okay, not everything turned out perfect, but as The Art of the Start makes clear, there are no guarantees, only great opportunities. Read this book and then go do something wonderful." -Geoffrey Moore, author of Crossing the Chasm "This is a delightful, complete, and consummately practical entrepreneur's handbook-quintessential Kawasaki. Every person who wants to start a business should read it. And read the footnote on page eight. There's more good stuff in here, but this alone is worth the price of the book." -Clayton Christensen, author of The Innovator's Dilemma and The Innovator's Solution "I have built my business into an internationally famous brand, and yet after reading this book, I have this nearly uncontrollable urge to chuck my whole business and start all over again. Guy's book revealed so many things I had never even suspected and shattered so many of my illusions, that it read like a novel. I would love to be the bank for the people who read this book." -Jay Conrad Levinson, author of the Guerrilla Marketing series of books "As useful for the next great not-for-profit as for the next great VC-funded startup. Anyone trying to change the world should read The Art of the Start . I wish it had been around when I started Teach for America." -Wendy Kopp, president and founder of Teach for America
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, July 2004
Library Journal, November 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A new product, a new service, a new company, a new division, a new anything - where there's a will, Kawasaki shows the way with his essential steps to launching one's dreams.
Main Description
A new product, a new service, a new company, a new division, a new organization, a new anything--where there's a will, here's the way. It begins with a dream that just won't quit, the once-in-a-lifetime thunderbolt of pure inspiration, the obsession, the world-beater, the killer app, the next big thing. Everyone who wants to make the world a better place becomes possessed by a grand idea. But what does it take to turn your idea into action? Whether you are an entrepreneur, intrapreneur, or not-for-profit crusader, there's no shortage of advice available on issues such as writing a business plan, recruiting, raising capital, and branding. In fact, there are so many books, articles, and Web sites that many startups get bogged down to the point of paralysis. Or else they focus on the wrong priorities and go broke before they discover their mistakes. In The Art of the Start, Guy Kawasaki brings two decades of experience as one of business's most original and irreverent strategists to offer the essential guide for anyone starting anything, from a multinational corporation to a church group. At Apple in the 1980s, he helped lead one of the great companies of the century, turning ordinary consumers into evangelists. As founder and CEO of Garage Technology Ventures, a venture capital firm, he has field-tested his ideas with dozens of newly hatched companies. And as the author of bestselling business books and articles, he has advised thousands of people who are making their startup dreams real. From raising money to hiring the right people, from defining your positioning to creating a brand, from creating buzz to buzzing the competition, from managing a board to fostering a community, this book will guide you through an adventure that's more art than science--the art of the start.
Main Description
A new product, a new service, a new company, a new division, a new organization, a new anything-where there's a will, here's the way. It begins with a dream that just won't quit, the once-in-a-lifetime thunderbolt of pure inspiration, the obsession, the world-beater, the killer app, the next big thing. Everyone who wants to make the world a better place becomes possessed by a grand idea. But what does it take to turn your idea into action? Whether you are an entrepreneur, intrapreneur, or not-for-profit crusader, there's no shortage of advice available on issues such as writing a business plan, recruiting, raising capital, and branding. In fact, there are so many books, articles, and Web sites that many startups get bogged down to the point of paralysis. Or else they focus on the wrong priorities and go broke before they discover their mistakes. In The Art of the Start, Guy Kawasaki brings two decades of experience as one of business's most original and irreverent strategists to offer the essential guide for anyone starting anything, from a multinational corporation to a church group. At Apple in the 1980s, he helped lead one of the great companies of the century, turning ordinary consumers into evangelists. As founder and CEO of Garage Technology Ventures, a venture capital firm, he has field-tested his ideas with dozens of newly hatched companies. And as the author of bestselling business books and articles, he has advised thousands of people who are making their startup dreams real. From raising money to hiring the right people, from defining your positioning to creating a brand, from creating buzz to buzzing the competition, from managing a board to fostering a community, this book will guide you through an adventure that's more art than science-the art of the start.
Main Description
What does it take to turn ideas into action? What are the elements of a perfect pitch? How do you win the war for talent? How do you establish a brand without bucks? These are some of the issues everyone faces when starting or revitalizing any undertaking, and Guy Kawasaki, former marketing maven of Apple Computer, provides the answers.The Art of the Startwill give you the essential steps to launch great products, services, and companies'whether you are dreaming of starting the next Microsoft or a not-for-profit that's going to change the world. It also shows managers how to unleash entrepreneurial thinking at established companies, helping them foster the pluck and creativity that their businesses need to stay ahead of the pack. Kawasaki provides readers with GIST?Great Ideas for Starting Things'including his field-tested insider's techniques for bootstrapping, branding, networking, recruiting, pitching, rainmaking, and, most important in this fickle consumer climate, building buzz.At Apple, Kawasaki helped turn ordinary customers into fanatics. As founder and CEO of Garage Technology Ventures, he has tested his iconoclastic ideas on real- world start- ups. And as an irrepressible columnist for Forbes, he has honed his best thinking about The Art of the Start.
Main Description
What does it take to turn ideas into action? What are the elements of a perfect pitch? How do you win the war for talent? How do you establish a brand without bucks? These are some of the issues everyone faces when starting or revitalizing any undertaking, and Guy Kawasaki, former marketing maven of Apple Computer, provides the answers. The Art of the Start will give you the essential steps to launch great products, services, and companies—whether you are dreaming of starting the next Microsoft or a not-for-profit that’s going to change the world. It also shows managers how to unleash entrepreneurial thinking at established companies, helping them foster the pluck and creativity that their businesses need to stay ahead of the pack. Kawasaki provides readers with GIST—Great Ideas for Starting Things—including his field-tested insider’s techniques for bootstrapping, branding, networking, recruiting, pitching, rainmaking, and, most important in this fickle consumer climate, building buzz. At Apple, Kawasaki helped turn ordinary customers into fanatics. As founder and CEO of Garage Technology Ventures, he has tested his iconoclastic ideas on real- world start- ups. And as an irrepressible columnist for Forbes , he has honed his best thinking about The Art of the Start .
Main Description
What does it take to turn ideas into action? What are the elements of a perfect pitch? How do you win the war for talent? How do you establish a brand without bucks? These are some of the issues everyone faces when starting or revitalizing any undertaking, and Guy Kawasaki, former marketing maven of Apple Computer, provides the answers.The Art of the Startwill give you the essential steps to launch great products, services, and companies—whether you are dreaming of starting the next Microsoft or a not-for-profit that’s going to change the world. It also shows managers how to unleash entrepreneurial thinking at established companies, helping them foster the pluck and creativity that their businesses need to stay ahead of the pack. Kawasaki provides readers with GIST—Great Ideas for Starting Things—including his field-tested insider’s techniques for bootstrapping, branding, networking, recruiting, pitching, rainmaking, and, most important in this fickle consumer climate, building buzz.At Apple, Kawasaki helped turn ordinary customers into fanatics. As founder and CEO of Garage Technology Ventures, he has tested his iconoclastic ideas on real- world start- ups. And as an irrepressible columnist for Forbes, he has honed his best thinking about The Art of the Start.
Unpaid Annotation
A new product, a new service, a new company, a new division, a new anything--where there's a will, here's the way, with Kawasaki's essential steps to launching one's dreams.
Table of Contents
Contents A friend is one to whom you can pour out the contents of your heart, chaff and grain alike. Knowing that the gentlest of hands will take and sift it, keep what is worth keeping, and with a breath of kindness, blow the rest away. öanonymous Read Me Firstxi
Causation
The Art of Startingp. 3
Articulation
The Art of Positioningp. 29
The Art of Pitchingp. 44
The Art of Writing a Business Planp. 66
Activation
The Art of Bootstrappingp. 79
The Art of Recruitingp. 100
The Art of Raising Capitalp. 119
Proliferation
The Art of Partneringp. 151
The Art of Brandingp. 167
The Art of Rainmakingp. 192
Obligation
The Art of Being a Menschp. 211
Afterwordp. 217
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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