Catalogue


The aid chain : coercion and commitment in development NGOs /
Tina Wallace with Lisa Bornstein and Jennifer Chapman.
imprint
Bourton on Dunsmore, Rugby, Warwickshire, UK : ITDG Publishing, 2006.
description
xviii, 199 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1853396265 (hbk.), 9781853396267 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bourton on Dunsmore, Rugby, Warwickshire, UK : ITDG Publishing, 2006.
isbn
1853396265 (hbk.)
9781853396267 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6080492
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [181]-189) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tina Wallace, worked in development, teaching at Universities in Uganda and Nigeria as well as in the UK, and she was involved in establishing the Gender and Strategic Planning Units in Oxfam Lisa Bornstein teaches and carries out research at the University of McGill in Canada
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] scholarly and readable guide....this work will be a classic."
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Significant proportions of aid already flow through the non-governmental sector, but questions are increasingly being asked about the role of NGOs and whether they can deliver on their ambitious claims. This study examines conditionality and mutual commitment between international aid donors and recipient NGOs, North and South. Fieldwork and case study material from Uganda and South Africa are used to support the authors? contention that the fast changing aid sector has--in the context of a dynamic policy environment--encouraged the mainstreaming of a managerial approach that does not admit of any analysis of power relations or cultural diversity. This increasing--essentially technical-- definition of the roles of NGOs has worked to limit the extent of the very development that the organizations were initially established to promote.
Main Description
Donors and UK NGOs have adopted increasingly similar approaches over the past ten years, yet little time or thought has apparently been spent on examining whether these enabled the kind of changes that they were aiming for. The Aid Chain presents three country case studies looking at the chain of aid money from donors in the UK, to UK NGOs, to partners and field offices in Uganda and South Africa, and how they use and account for their funding. The book examines how far local strategies and projects are influenced by changing donor policies and other external forces, and how far by internal imperatives. Each case study covers, donors and NGOs that are linked directly together through the funding chain, and a selection of other agencies, enabling a wider exploration of the issues. The book presents a range of findings of direct relevance and importance within each country context, and others that are more widely applicable. Book jacket.
Main Description
Significant proportions of aid already flow through the non-governmental sector, but questions are increasingly being asked about the role of NGOs and whether they can deliver on their ambitious claims. This study examines conditionality and mutual commitment between international aid donors and recipient NGOs, North and South. Fieldwork and case study material from Uganda and South Africa are used to support the authors' contention that the fast changing aid sector has--in the context of a dynamic policy environment--encouraged the mainstreaming of a managerial approach that does not admit of any analysis of power relations or cultural diversity. This increasing--essentially technical-- definition of the roles of NGOs has worked to limit the extent of the very development that the organizations were initially established to promote.
Main Description
Significant proportions of aid already flow through the non-governmental sector, but questions are increasingly being asked about the role of NGOs and whether they can deliver on their ambitious claims. This study examines conditionality and mutual commitment between international aid donors and recipient NGOs, North and South. Fieldwork and case study material from Uganda and South Africa are used to support the authors contention that the fast changing aid sector has--in the context of a dynamic policy environment--encouraged the mainstreaming of a managerial approach that does not admit of any analysis of power relations or cultural diversity. This increasing--essentially technical-- definition of the roles of NGOs has worked to limit the extent of the very development that the organizations were initially established to promote.
Main Description
Significant proportions of aid already flow through the non-governmental sector, but questions are increasingly being asked about the role of NGOs and whether they can deliver on their ambitious claims. This study examines conditionality and mutual commitment between international aid donors and recipient NGOs, North and South. Fieldwork and case study material from Uganda and South Africa are used to support the authors " contention that the fast changing aid sector has--in the context of a dynamic policy environment--encouraged the mainstreaming of a managerial approach that does not admit of any analysis of power relations or cultural diversity. This increasing--essentially technical-- definition of the roles of NGOs has worked to limit the extent of the very development that the organizations were initially established to promote.
Main Description
The Aid Chain explores the role of funding conditions in shaping co-operation and resistance as aid moves from donors, to NGOs, to local communities. Significant proportions of aid flow through the non-governmental sector but questions are increasingly being asked about the role of NGOs and whether they can deliver on their ambitious claims. This study examines whether the existing aid processes widely used by donors and NGOs are effective in tackling poverty and exclusion. Findings from fieldwork in Uganda, South Africa and the UK are used to show how the fast changing aid sector has, in the context of a dynamic policy environment, encouraged the mainstreaming of a managerial approach that does not admit of any analysis of power relations or cultural diversity. This increasing definition of the roles of NGOs as essentially technical, limits the extent of the very development that the organizations were initially established to promote.'...a scholarly and readable guide...this work will be a classic.' Tony Benn'This disturbing and dramatically important book has been crying out to be written. It is a stark revelation of uncomfortable realities from which we often try to hide...Anyone working in an aid organization who is serious about achieving the MDGs has to read this book, and to act on its lessons.' Robert Chambers
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Figure, tables and boxesp. xiv
About the authorsp. xv
Acronymsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Coercion and compliancep. 4
Commitmentp. 5
The researchp. 7
The research methodologyp. 9
Structure of the bookp. 17
The changing context for the work of development NGOsp. 19
Introductionp. 19
The new funding mechanismsp. 21
The challenges of the new aid architecturep. 23
Contrasting definitions of development: what is the project?p. 26
Concluding commentp. 28
The management of developmentp. 31
Introductionp. 31
NGOs and the packaging of aidp. 32
The language and practice of rational managementp. 34
Given the flaws, why has this approach dominated?p. 37
Those with power can promote the approaches they preferp. 38
The hold of logframe analysisp. 39
Participatory planning and human developmentp. 40
The conceptual basis of participatory planning within donor frameworksp. 43
Other approaches to planning and implementation existp. 44
The missing elementsp. 45
Concluding commentp. 47
The major UK donors and the flow of aid through the NGO sectorp. 49
Introductionp. 49
The donor context: funding flows 2000-3p. 51
DFIDp. 52
Who can access this funding?p. 53
Changing grant models and conditionsp. 56
Local fundingp. 60
Contractsp. 60
The European Unionp. 61
Medium-sized UK donors: Community Fund and Comic Reliefp. 63
Small UK donors: trusts and foundationsp. 68
UK NGOs as aid recipientsp. 69
The NGO context in Uganda and South Africap. 73
Ugandap. 73
NGOs in Ugandap. 76
South Africap. 82
Development challenges in South Africap. 84
Conclusionp. 89
Normative conditions: rational management of the aid chainp. 91
Project cycle management tools in the UKp. 92
Some different trendsp. 94
Project cycle management tools in South Africap. 95
Project cycle management in Ugandap. 100
Comparative perspectives on the benefits of the logframep. 104
Conclusionp. 106
The ties that bindp. 109
Questioning the status quo as heresyp. 109
The ties that bindp. 111
Donor contracts deepening the trendsp. 120
Loosening the tiesp. 122
Conclusionp. 128
Relationships: partnerships, power and participationp. 129
Introductionp. 129
The experiences of a faith-based organization in relating to European donorsp. 130
Donors encouraging alliances and networking: relationships in practicep. 133
Trying to build different, sustainable relations with local NGOsp. 140
Conclusionp. 144
Chains of influence in South Africap. 147
South African NGOs as partners: from negotiation to vulnerabilityp. 148
NGOs and gender mainstreaming: power, tools and meaningsp. 150
Beyond negotiation: training and organizational development NGOs in South Africap. 155
Conclusionsp. 157
Listening to the past and building a new futurep. 161
Other research supports our findings, which are relevant globallyp. 161
The key findings concerning the policies and procedures of the aid chainp. 161
The questions raised by these findingsp. 168
But isn't this all very depressing?p. 173
Alternative ways of workingp. 176
Appendixp. 179
Organisations interviewed for the mid-level survey of NGO-donor relations in South Africa and Uganda (see Figure 1.2 in chapter 1) that were not in the original aid chain sample established in the UK (see Table 1.1 in chapter 1)p. 179
Referencesp. 181
Websitesp. 189
Indexp. 191
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