Catalogue


Origins of democracy in ancient Greece /
Kurt A. Raaflaub, Josiah Ober, and Robert W. Wallace ; with chapters by Paul Cartledge and Cynthia Farrar.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
description
xi, 242 p.
ISBN
0520245628 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520245624 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
isbn
0520245628 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520245624 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6080453
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A balanced, high-quality analysis of the developing nature of Athenian political society and its relationship to 'democracy' as a timeless concept."--Mark Munn, author ofThe School of History
Flap Copy
"A balanced, high-quality analysis of the developing nature of Athenian political society and its relationship to 'democracy' as a timeless concept."--Mark Munn, author of "The School of History"
Flap Copy
"A balanced, high-quality analysis of the developing nature of Athenian political society and its relationship to 'democracy' as a timeless concept."--Mark Munn, author of The School of History
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-07-01:
Scholars of ancient Greek history and culture will find this volume stimulating for its content and method, and especially for the ideas and issues that permeate it. Situated at the conjunction of history, classics, and political theory, this work by Raaflaub (Brown), Ober (Stanford), and Wallace (Cambridge) focuses on issues important to historical investigation and on democratic thinking and practice that originated in Greece: (1) democracy as institutions and values; (2) the evolution of democracy from rule by aristocrats and elites to rule by community and laws; (3) the role of leaders such as Solon, Cleisthenes, and Ephialtes, and the effects of collective action; (4) the contributions of hoplites on the battlefield, rowers in warships, and the design of foreign policy; (5) communal decision making in assembly, and the extent to which citizenship was granted; (6) the emergence of egalitarian principles in a society of strong men and heroes; and (7) the particular character of Athenian democracy in the wider context of ancient Greek society. The five contributors disagree yet constantly reference each other as they examine how democracy evolved in ancient Greece, and the preconditions and crises that made it possible--demonstrating the ancient principle of debating differing opinions in public. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above; general readers. L. J. Alderink emeritus, Concordia College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
This book presents a state-of-the-art debate about the origins of Athenian democracy by five eminent scholars. The result is a stimulating, critical exploration and interpretation of the extant evidence on this intriguing and important topic. The authors address such questions as: Why was democracy first realized in ancient Greece? Was democracy "invented" or did it evolve over a long period of time? What were the conditions for democracy, the social and political foundations that made this development possible? And what factors turned the possibility of democracy into necessity and reality? The authors first examine the conditions in early Greek society that encouraged equality and "people's power." They then scrutinize, in their social and political contexts, three crucial points in the evolution of democracy: the reforms connected with the names of Solon, Cleisthenes, and Ephialtes in the early and late sixth and mid-fifth century. Finally, an ancient historian and a political scientist review the arguments presented in the previous chapters and add their own perspectives, asking what lessons we can draw today from the ancient democratic experience. Designed for a general readership as well as students and scholars, the book intends to provoke discussion by presenting side by side the evidence and arguments that support various explanations of the origins of democracy, thus enabling readers to join in the debate and draw their own conclusions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The contributors to this text present a debate about the origins of Athenian democracy. The result is a stimulating critical exploration and interpretation of the extant evidence on this intriguing topic.
Table of Contents
About the Authorsp. vii
Chronology of Eventsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
"People's Power" and Egalitarian Trends in Archaic Greecep. 22
Revolutions and a New Order in Solonian Athens and Archaic Greecep. 49
"I Besieged That Man": Democracy's Revolutionary Startp. 83
The Breakthrough of Demokratia in Mid-Fifth-Century Athensp. 105
Democracy, Origins of: Contribution to a Debatep. 155
Power to the Peoplep. 170
Bibliographyp. 197
Index of Primary Sourcesp. 225
General Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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