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The making of early Chinese classical poetry /
Stephen Owen.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Asia Center : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2006.
description
360 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0674021363 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780674021365
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Asia Center : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2006.
isbn
0674021363 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780674021365
catalogue key
6079627
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [349]-354) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-07-01:
Arguably the most erudite and prolific scholar/translator of English language studies of traditional Chinese poetry and poetics, Owen (Harvard) has published everything from introductory surveys to highly specialized technical studies of classical Chinese verse. The present work--six chapters plus a substantial introduction and seven useful appendixes--presents a detailed and fairly comprehensive treatment of how the standard corpus of "classical Chinese poetry" evolved and gained ever-wider acceptance. The author demonstrates how ahistorical consistencies, from internal structure to treatment of common themes and personae, often had more influence on the placement of a poem than historical evidence. His study of the evolution of anonymous poems, folk songs, and poems in imitation of earlier works is especially interesting. The organization of chapters, in combination with the detailed index, makes this work useful as a reference resource as well as an overview of the evolution (production through reproduction) of the corpus of early Chinese classical poetry. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. W. Walls emeritus, Simon Fraser University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Arguably the most erudite and prolific scholar/translator of English language studies of traditional Chinese poetry and poetics, Owen has published everything from introductory surveys to highly specialized technical studies of classical Chinese verse. The present work--six chapters plus a substantial introduction and seven useful appendixes--presents a detailed and fairly comprehensive treatment of how the standard corpus of "classical Chinese poetry" evolved and gained ever-wider acceptance.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
Over the centuries, early Chinese classical poetry became embedded in a chronological account with great cultural resonance and came to be transmitted in versions accepted as authoritative. But modern scholarship has questioned components of the account and cast doubt on the accuracy of received texts. The result has destabilized the study of early Chinese poetry. This study adopts a double approach to the poetry composed between the end of the first century B.C.E. and the third century C.E. First, it examines extant material from this period synchronically, as if it were not historically arranged, with some poems attached to authors and some not. By setting aside putative differences of author and genre, Stephen Owen argues, we can see that this was "one poetry," created from a shared poetic repertoire and compositional practices. Second, it considers how the scholars of the late fifth and early sixth centuries selected this material and reshaped it to produce the standard account of classical poetry. As Owen shows, early poetry comes to us through reproduction-reproduction by those who knew the poem and transmitted it, by musicians who performed it, and by scribes and anthologists-all of whom changed texts to suit their needs.
Table of Contents
"Han" poetry and the southern dynastiesp. 23
A "grammar" of early poetryp. 73
Immortalsp. 139
Death and the feastp. 178
Author and speakerp. 214
Imitationp. 260
Yuefu as a generic termp. 301
The musical traditionsp. 308
Anthologies and poetry in the five syllable linep. 313
"As performed by the Jin musicians"p. 319
Examples of the topic "human life is brief"p. 327
Shijing echoes in the "old poems" : a casep. 329
Imitations, retellings, and renditionsp. 336
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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