Catalogue


Advertising sin and sickness : the politics of alcohol and tobacco marketing, 1950-1990 /
Pamela E. Pennock.
imprint
DeKalb : Northern Illinois University Press, c2007.
description
viii, 282 p. : ill.
ISBN
0875803687 (clothbound : alk. paper), 9780875803685 (clothbound : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
DeKalb : Northern Illinois University Press, c2007.
isbn
0875803687 (clothbound : alk. paper)
9780875803685 (clothbound : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6079344
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-275) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-12-01:
Historian Pennock (Univ. of Michigan-Dearborn) delivers an insightful, well-researched study of the politics of alcohol and tobacco marketing in recent US history. She breaks down her work into three distinct stages. First, she examines the largely unsuccessful endeavor of the post-Prohibition temperance movement to restrict the marketing of alcohol in the 1950s. Then she details the more successful campaign of anti-smoking advocates to require a warning label on cigarette packaging and to prohibit the broadcast media from advertising tobacco products. Finally, she explores the reemergence of an effort to limit the marketing of alcohol in the 1970s-80s. Throughout, Pennock does a particularly nice job of linking these distinct movements with broader social trends, ranging from the rise of mass consumerism in the 1950s to the emergence of consumer rights groups and healthy lifestyle concerns in the 1960s-70s. Pennock concludes that her study displays Americans' ambivalence about "their incessant appetite for consumer goods and their traditional desires for limits and restraint," as well as the difficulty in trying to determine where and when a democratic society can draw the line on free speech. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. P. B. Levy York College of Pennsylvania
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Meticulously researched. A splendid book that is sure to find interested audiences in many academic fields, as well as in activist circles."- Business History Review "The author quite rightly sees this history as an important element in the unfolding reaction to consumer culture in the United States and the uneasiness sometimes associated with the growth of marketing to children."-James Gilbert, University of Maryland "Researched in fascinating detail ... a valuable and well-argued addition to the literature."- Addiction
“Meticulously researched. A splendid book that is sure to find interested audiences in many academic fields, as well as in activist circles.”- Business History Review “The author quite rightly sees this history as an important element in the unfolding reaction to consumer culture in the United States and the uneasiness sometimes associated with the growth of marketing to children.”-James Gilbert, University of Maryland “Researched in fascinating detail ... a valuable and well-argued addition to the literature.”- Addiction
This item was reviewed in:
ForeWord Magazine, May 2007
Choice, December 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In the second half of the twentieth century, despite shifting rhetoric and changing participants, debates over the the regulation of alcohol and cigarette marketing remained essentially a contest over American values. The politics of advertising these products reflect profound cultural dilemmas about consumerism and private enterprise, morality and health, scientific authority and the legitimate regulation of commercial speech.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The politics of advertising alcohol and cigarette products reflects profound cultural dilemmas about consumerism and private enterprise, morality and health, scientific authority and the legitimate regulation of commercial speech. This text looks at this area.
Main Description
Temperance advocates believed they could eradicate alcohol by persuading consumers to avoid it; prohibitionists put their faith in legislation forbidding its manufacture, transportation, and sale. After the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment, however, reformers sought a new method-targeting advertising. In Advertising Sin and Sickness , Pamela E. Pennock documents three distinct periods in the history of the national debate over the regulation of alcohol and tobacco marketing. Tracing the fate of proposed federal policies, she introduces their advocates and opponents, from politicians and religious leaders to scientists and businessmen. In the 1950s, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and other religious organizations joined hands in an effort to ban all alcohol advertising. They quickly found themselves at odds, however, with an increasingly urbane mainstream American culture. In the 1960s, moralists took backstage to consumer activists and scientific authorities in the campaign to control cigarette advertising and mandate labeling. Secular and scientific arguments came to dominate policy debates, and the controversy over alcohol marketing during the 1970s and 1980s highlighted the issues of substance abuse, public health, and consumer rights. The politics of alcohol and tobacco advertising, Pennock concludes, reflect profound cultural ambivalence about consumerism and private enterprise, morality and health, scientific authority and the legitimate regulation of commercial speech. Today, the United States continues to face difficult questions about the proper role of the federal government when powerful industries market potentially harmful but undeniably popular products.
Table of Contents
Introduction - health, morality, and free speechp. 3
The failed fight to ban alcohol advertising, 1947-1958
Temperance and mass societyp. 15
The industries' regulatory responsep. 36
Legislative battles - politics and rhetoricp. 61
The battle to regulate cigarette marketing, 1960s
Emergence of the postwar antismoking movementp. 91
The warning label debatep. 120
The next push - restricting advertisingp. 142
The new temperance movement and alcohol marketing restrictions, 1970s and 1980s
The political, legal, and scientific context of regulationp. 169
Policy contests - warning labels and advertising controlsp. 197
Conclusion - the elusive quest for restraintsp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem