Catalogue


Fuseli's Milton gallery : turning readers into spectators /
Luisa Cale.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press ; New York : Published in the United States by Oxford University Press, 2006.
description
xiv, 259 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0199267383 (pbk. : acid-free paper), 9780199267385 (pbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press ; New York : Published in the United States by Oxford University Press, 2006.
isbn
0199267383 (pbk. : acid-free paper)
9780199267385 (pbk. : acid-free paper)
contents note
The literary galleries, the market, and the field of art -- The spectator turned reader : printed text at the galleries -- The reader turned spectator : visual narratives -- Satan encountering death, sin interposing : Milton' s allegory and the politics of seeing -- The plot of Adam and Eve.
general note
A comprehensive account of the circulation and adaptation of literature in late 18th-century art, explores the visual dimension of reading in an emerging visual culture and offers a range of new ways of reading literature and painting together.
catalogue key
6079091
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Bentley, G.E., Jr. 2008/01/01.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Luisa Cal is Lecturer in the School of English and Humanities at Birkbeck, University of London.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work calls into question the separation of reading and viewing as autonomous aesthetic practices. It analyses exhibitions as important sites of Romantic sociability and an interrelated medium for the literature, debates and controversies of the Revolutionary period.
Main Description
Between 1791 and 1799 Swiss painter Henry Fuseli turned Milton's Paradise Lost into a series of 40 pictures that were exhibited in London in 1799 and 1800. Starting from Fuseli's adaptation, Luisa Cal analyzes how visual practices impact on the act of reading and calls into question the separation of reading and viewing as autonomous aesthetic practices.
Main Description
Between 1791 and 1799 Swiss painter Henry Fuseli turned Milton'sParadise Lostinto a series of 40 pictures that were exhibited in London in 1799 and 1800. Starting from Fuseli's adaptation, Luisa Cal analyzes how visual practices impact on the act of reading and calls into question the separation of reading and viewing as autonomous aesthetic practices.
Main Description
Between 1791 and 1799 Swiss painter Henry Fuseli turned Milton's Paradise Lost into a series of 40 pictures that were exhibited in London in 1799 and 1800. Starting from Fuseli's adaptation, Luisa Cale analyzes how visual practices impact on the act of reading and calls into question the separation of reading and viewing as autonomous aesthetic practices.
Main Description
Fuseli's Milton Gallery challenges the antipictorial theories and canons of Romantic period culture. Between 1791 and 1799 Swiss painter Henry Fuseli turned Milton's Paradise Lost into a series of 40 pictures. Fuseli's project and other literary galleries developed within an expanding marketfor illustrated books and a culture of anthologization used to reading British and other 'classics' in terms of the visualization of key moments in the text. Thus transformed into repositories of virtual pictures literary texts became ideal sources of subjects for painters. Illustrating Britishliterature was a way of inventing a national 'grand style' to fit the needs of a consumer society. Cale calls into question the separation of reading and viewing as autonomous aesthetic practices. To 'turn readers into spectators' meant to place readers and reading within the dizzying world of associations offered by an emerging culture of exhibitions. Attending to the energized reading effectsdeveloped by Fuseli's Gallery we rediscover a new side of the Romantic imagination which is not the solitary mentalist experience preferred by Wordsworth and Coleridge, nor divorced from the senses, let alone a refuge from the crowded public spaces of the Revolutionary period. Rather, Fuseli'sembodied aesthetic exemplifies the associationist psychology espoused by the radical circle convening around the publisher Joseph Johnson, including Joseph Priestley and Mary Wollstonecraft. This book analyses exhibitions as important sites of Romantic sociability and one of many interrelatedmediums for the literature, debates and controversies of the Revolutionary period.
Table of Contents
List of Platesp. xi
List of Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: 'Turning Readers into Spectators'p. 1
The Literary Galleries and the Field of Artp. 16
Commerce, Art, and Public Culturep. 18
Literary Investmentsp. 29
Fuseli's Milton Galleryp. 42
Private Interest-Public Benefit: Fuseli's Careerp. 52
The Spectator Turned Reader: Printed Text at the Galleriesp. 58
The Spectator as Readerp. 59
Reading Aids at Exhibitionsp. 64
Macklin's Catalogue: Excerpting and Viewing the Poetsp. 70
Fuseli's Catalogue: Excerpting and Abridging Miltonp. 78
Fuseli's Milton: Epic and Paintingp. 96
Poems on the Galleries: The Reader Turned Spectator Turned Authorp. 99
The Reader Turned Spectator: Visual Narrativesp. 105
Visual Bookkeepingp. 105
Educating the Eye: A Reader's Progressp. 112
Technologies of Vision: Magic Lanterns, the Eidophusikon, and Panoramasp. 114
Viewing Practices and Moving Picturesp. 121
Gallery Plotsp. 126
Towards Montagep. 131
'Satan encount' ring Death, Sin interposing': Milton's Allegory and the Politics of Seeingp. 142
Representing Supernatural Beingsp. 144
Lapland Orgiesp. 162
Pictures at Exhibitions and the Politics of Obscurityp. 171
The Plot of Adam and Evep. 184
Conclusionp. 215
Appendix: 'List of Pictures in the Milton Gallery', The Times, 28 May 1799p. 221
Bibliographyp. 225
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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