Catalogue


77 dances : Japanese calligraphy by poets, monks, and scholars, 1568-1868 /
Stephen Addiss ; foreword by Richard Waller.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Boston, Mass. : Weatherhill, 2006.
description
xiv, 259 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 31 cm.
ISBN
0834805715 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780834805712
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston, Mass. : Weatherhill, 2006.
isbn
0834805715 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780834805712
general note
Published in conjunction with an exhibition held at the Joel and Lila Harnett Museum of Art, University of Richmond, Richmond, Va.; the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Ala.; the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; and at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach, Fla.
catalogue key
6077157
 
Acquired through Fred S. Haines fund
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-254) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
The first book on Japanese calligraphy from the significant Momoyama and Edo periods (15681868), 77 Dances examines the art of writing at a time when it was undergoing a remarkable flowering, as illustrated by over one hundred sumptuous illustrations. Everything from complex Zen conundrums to gossamer haiku poems were written with verve, energy, and creativity that display how deeply the fascination for calligraphy had penetrated into the social fabric of Japan. Examining the varied groups of calligraphers creating works for diverse audiences will show how these artistic worlds both maintained their own independence and interacted to create a rich brocade of calligraphic techniques and styles.The book begins with basic information on calligraphy, followed by six main sections, each representing a major facet of the art, with an introductory essay followed by detailed analyses of the seventy-seven featured works. The essays include: The revival of Japanese courtly aesthetics in writing out waka poems on highly decorated paperThe use of Chinese writing styles and script formsScholars who took up the brush to compose poems in Chinese expressing their Confucian idealsCalligraphy by major literati poets and paintersThe development of haiku as practiced by master poet-painters The work of famous Zen masters such as Hakuin and Ryokan Pages 89. Pages 8283. Pages 22021.
Main Description
The first book on Japanese calligraphy from the significant Momoyama and Edo periods (1568–1868), 77 Dances examines the art of writing at a time when it was undergoing a remarkable flowering, as illustrated by over one hundred sumptuous illustrations. Everything from complex Zen conundrums to gossamer haiku poems were written with verve, energy, and creativity that display how deeply the fascination for calligraphy had penetrated into the social fabric of Japan. Examining the varied groups of calligraphers creating works for diverse audiences will show how these artistic worlds both maintained their own independence and interacted to create a rich brocade of calligraphic techniques and styles. The book begins with basic information on calligraphy, followed by six main sections, each representing a major facet of the art, with an introductory essay followed by detailed analyses of the seventy-seven featured works. The essays include: " The revival of Japanese courtly aesthetics in writing out waka poems on highly decorated paper " The use of Chinese writing styles and script forms " Scholars who took up the brush to compose poems in Chinese expressing their Confucian ideals " Calligraphy by major literati poets and painters " The development of haiku as practiced by master poet-painters " The work of famous Zen masters such as Hakuin and Ryokan
Main Description
The first book on Japanese calligraphy from the significant Momoyama and Edo periods (15681868), 77 Dances examines the art of writing at a time when it was undergoing a remarkable flowering, as illustrated by over one hundred sumptuous illustrations. Everything from complex Zen conundrums to gossamer haiku poems were written with verve, energy, and creativity that display how deeply the fascination for calligraphy had penetrated into the social fabric of Japan. Examining the varied groups of calligraphers creating works for diverse audiences will show how these artistic worlds both maintained their own independence and interacted to create a rich brocade of calligraphic techniques and styles. The book begins with basic information on calligraphy, followed by six main sections, each representing a major facet of the art, with an introductory essay followed by detailed analyses of the seventy-seven featured works. The essays include: The revival of Japanese courtly aesthetics in writing out waka poems on highly decorated paper The use of Chinese writing styles and script forms Scholars who took up the brush to compose poems in Chinese expressing their Confucian ideals Calligraphy by major literati poets and painters The development of haiku as practiced by master poet-painters The work of famous Zen masters such as Hakuin and Ryokan
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Fundamentals of East Asian Calligraphyp. 5
The Revival of Waka Calligraphyp. 13
Emperor Goyozei (1571-1617), On the Oi Riverp. 17
Konoe Nobutada (1565-1614), Letter of Congratulationsp. 19
Hon'ami Koetsu (1558-1637), Poem on Decorated Paperp. 13
Shojo Shokado (1584-1639), Li Po Prefacep. 25
Karasumaru Mitsuhiro (1579-1638), Waka on Decorated Tanzakup. 29
Konoe Iehiro (1667-1736), Heart Sutrap. 31
Gion Kaji (active early eighteenth century), Waiting for Blossomsp. 35
Gion Yuri (1694-1764), Five Lotus Sutra Wakap. 38
Ike Gyokuran (1728-1784), Three Waka on Flowersp. 41
Ota Nanpo (1749-1823), Kyoka: Saigyo's Catp. 44
Kamo Suetaka (1751-1841), Choraku-ji's Cherry Blossomsp. 46
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875), Lotus Cupp. 48
Calligraphers in the Karayo (Chinese) Traditionp. 52
Kitajima Setsuzan (1636-1697), Eight Immortals of the Wine Cupp. 59
Hosoi Kotaku (1658-1735), The Old Drunkard's Pavilion (Screens)p. 60
Sasaki Shizuma (1619-1695), Tehon of the "Thousand-Character Essay"p. 65
Sasaki Shogen (n.d.), Tu Fu Quatrainp. 67
Hayashi Doei (1640-1708), Flowery Purity Palacep. 70
Ko Ten'i (Watanabe Gentai, 1649-1722), Window Snowp. 72
Mitsui Shinna (1700-1782), Eight Immortals of the Wine Cupp. 74
Morimoto Itsuzan (1702-1778), Single Line of Seal Scriptp. 77
Cho Tosai (1713-1786), Seal-Script Triptychp. 80
Ryu Kobi (Ryu Soro, 1714-1792), Dragons Growlp. 82
Sawada Toko (1732-1796), On the Riverbankp. 85
Ichikawa Beian (1779-1858), Ink Bamboo Songp. 88
Maki Ryoko (1787-1833), Tea Songp. 90
Tokai Okon (1816-1888), Cloudsp. 94
Calligraphy by Confucian Scholarsp. 99
Hayashi Razan (1583-1657), Facing the Moonp. 104
Nakae Toju (1608-1648), Bring the Ch'inp. 107
Kumazawa Banzan (1619-1691), Letter with a Poemp. 109
Ito Jinsai (1627-1705), Ripening Plumsp. 112
Ito Togai (1670-1736), Quote from the I Chingp. 114
Ogyu Sorai (1666-1728), The Setting Sunp. 117
Hattori Nankaku (1683-1759), Spring and Autumn Quatrainsp. 119
Uno Meika (1698-1745), Spring in Kitanop. 122
Shibano Ritsuzan (1734-1807), Poem on Mount Fujip. 125
Koga Seiri (1752-1817), Magnoliasp. 127
Kameda Bosai (1754-1826), Old Treesp. 130
Rai San'yo (1780-1832), The Ballad of Sanjo Bridgep. 132
Calligraphy by Literati Poets and Paintersp. 136
Ishikawa Jozan (1583-1672), Draft in Clerical Scriptp. 139
Gion Nankai (1676-1751), Autumn Viewp. 142
Ike Taiga (1723-1776), Couplet on a Fanp. 144
Uragami Gyokudo (1745-1820), Evening Viewp. 147
Nukina Kaioku (1778-1863), Poems on Sencha Setp. 150
Shinozaki Shochiku (1782-1851), Still Brightp. 153
Ema Saiko (1787-1861), On Becoming Fiftyp. 155
Yanagawa Seigan (1789-1858), Rain over the Streamp. 157
The Haiku Calligraphy Traditionp. 160
Kaga no Chiyo (1703-1775), Six Spring Haikup. 163
Yosa Buson (1716-1784), Letter to Kitop. 165
Oemaru (1722-1805), Fallen Leavesp. 168
Inoue Shiro (1742-1812), Falling Rainp. 170
Den Kikusha (1753-1826), Flowers of the Four Seasonsp. 173
Sakai Hoitsu (1761-1828), Haiku on a Fanp. 175
Takebe Socho (1761-1814), Charcoal Kilnsp. 177
Kobayashi Issa (1763-1827), Garden Butterflyp. 181
Sakurai Baishitsu (1769-1852), Four Seasons Haikup. 183
Zen Calligraphyp. 185
Sakugen Shuryo (1501-1579), The Voice of the Raindropsp. 189
Fugai Ekun (1568-1654), Six Windows Shutp. 193
Takuan Soho (1573-1645), All Things Revolvep. 194
Kogetsu Sogan (1574-1643), You Are Leavingp. 197
Gyokushu Soban (1600-1668), The Mosquito Bites the Iron Bullp. 199
Gesshu Soko (1618-1696), Huang-po's Buddha-Dharmap. 202
Tetsugyu Dosa (1628-1700), The Paper-Buddha Statuep. 204
Tetsugen Doko (1630-1682), Moon-Mindp. 207
Kakuzan Dosho (1640-1717), Death Poemp. 209
Bankei Yotaku (1622-1693), Leisurely Cloudsp. 213
Kogetsu Zenzai (1667-1751), Not Thinking Good or Evilp. 215
Daido Bunka (1680-1752), Heart-Mindp. 217
Hakuin Ekaku (1685-1768), Kotobukip. 220
Torei Enji (1721-1792), Mantra to Kokuzop. 223
Tominaga Jakugon (1702-1771), Wind Arisesp. 227
Jiun Onko (1718-1804), Horsesp. 228
Gocho Kankai (1739-1835), Striking the Bamboop. 231
Seisetsu Shucho (1746-1820), One More Katsup. 235
Inzan Ien (1754-1817), Complete Understandingp. 237
Daien Buttsu (d. 1825), Mumonkan Koanp. 237
Daigu Ryokan (1758-1831), On the Road in Shinshup. 239
Fugai Honko (1779-1847), The Mountain Spiritp. 243
Glossaryp. 247
Selected Bibliographyp. 249
Indexp. 255
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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