Catalogue


Writing against revolution : literary conservatism in Britain, 1790-1832 /
Kevin Gilmartin.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
description
xii, 316 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521861136 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780521861137 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
isbn
0521861136 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780521861137 (hardback : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6066248
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-310) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-08-01:
Study of British counterrevolutionary literature of the Romantic period has become a crowded field, so this reviewer was surprised to find that Gilmartin (Cal Tech) breaks so much new ground. After one gets past the author's excessive readiness to make his own political commitments clear, the book delivers fresh discussions of what is really central in Hannah More and of artistic innovation in the anti-Jacobin novel (a form usually found simply to call on established generic expectations). The most pressing question in this field is now how to relate the anti-Jacobinism of the 1790s to the more wide-ranging kinds of conservatism of the years leading up to Waterloo and the first Reform Bill. Gilmartin does not face this question head-on, but he provides many hints, especially in a superb final chapter, which parallels the rightward turns of Coleridge and Southey. His discussion is complex and allusive, which limits the book's audience to ambitious scholars. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. L. Patey Smith College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'the strengths of this book are the detailed and persuasive readings of liminal texts … all such 'expression' was a tribute to the radical culture which forced it into existence.' BARS Bulletin & Review
"...Writing against Revolution succeeds admirably in what it sets out to do: it uncovers the breadth, diversity, and complexity of counterrevolutionary writing in the Romantic period. With impeccable research in both primary and critical texts, Gilmartin brings the controversies of the early decades of the nineteenth century to life." -Judith W. Page,University of Florida
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Library
Kevin Gilmartin explores the literary forms of counterrevolutionary expression in Britain, showing that while conservative movements were often inclined to treat print culture as a dangerously unstable field, a whole range of print forms became central tools in the counterrevolutionary campaign. Beginning with the pamphlet campaigns of the loyalist Association movement and the Cheap Repository in the 1790s, Gilmartin analyses the role of periodical reviews and anti-Jacobin fiction in the campaign against revolution, and closes with a new account of the conservative careers of Robert Southey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
Description for Bookstore
Kevin Gilmartin explores the literary forms of counterrevolutionary expression in Britain, analysing the role of periodical reviews and anti-Jacobin fiction in the campaign against revolution, and closes with a fresh account of the conservative careers of Robert Southey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
Description for Bookstore
Kevin Gilmartin explores the literary forms of counterrevolutionary expression in Britain, analysing the role of periodical reviews and anti-Jacobin fiction in the campaign against revolution, and closes with a new account of the conservative careers of Robert Southey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Gilmartin explores the literary forms of counterrevolutionary expression in Britain, showing that while conservative movements were often inclined to treat print culture as a dangerously unstable field, a whole range of print forms became central tools in the counterrevolutionary campaign.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. VIII
Acknowledgmentsp. IX
List of abbreviationsp. XI
Introduction: Reconsidering counterrevolutionary expressionp. 1
In the theater of counterrevolution: loyalist association and vernacular addressp. 19
"Study to be quiet": Hannah More and counterrevolutionary moral reformp. 55
Reviewing subversion: the function of criticism at the present crisisp. 96
Subverting fictions: the counterrevolutionary form of the novelp. 150
Southey, Coleridge, and the end of anti-Jacobinism in Britainp. 207
Notesp. 253
Bibliographyp. 295
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem