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Justice and the social contract : essays on Rawlsian political philosophy /
Samuel Freeman.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
description
xii, 340 pages ; 25 cm
ISBN
0195301412, 9780195301410 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
isbn
0195301412
9780195301410 (alk. paper)
contents note
pt. I.A theory of justice. Reason and agreement in social contract views ; Utilitarianism, deontology, and the priority of right ; Consequentialism, publicity, stability, and property-owning democracy ; Rawls and luck egalitarianism ; Congruence and the good of justice -- pt. II. Political liberalism. Political Liberalism and the possibility of a just democratic constitution ; Public reason and political justification -- pt. III. The law of peoples. The law of peoples, social cooperation, human rights, and distributative justice ; Distributative justice and the law of peoples.
abstract
"This text collects articles on the influential philosopher John Rawls. It places Rawls within historical context in the social contract tradition, and addresses criticisms of this position. It is useful to a range of scholars interested in Rawls and the expanse of his influence."
catalogue key
6059835
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-06-01:
The editor of John Rawls's Collected Papers (1999) and Essays in the History of Political Philosophy (2007), Freeman (law and philosophy, Univ. of Pennsylvania) here collects nine essays of commentary on Rawls's work (seven previously published), most of them a defense of Rawls against his critics. In essays on A Theory of Justice, Freeman describes the distinguishing characteristics of Rawls's social contract, defends his account of the distinction between deontological and teleological moral theories, distinguishes his position from "luck egalitarianism," and shows the centrality for Rawls of the claim that any theory of justice must be able to win widespread allegiance. Several essays show how Rawls's own recognition of the failure of his argument in A Theory of Justice, that "justice as fairness" could win adherents from proponents of any moral theory, led to the more qualified reformulations of Political Liberalism, in which political legitimacy replaces "justice as fairness" and a conjectured consensus about political legitimacy replaces the argument that justice is necessarily congruent with the good. Two essays on The Law of Peoples explain why Rawls insists that principles of distributive justice do not apply globally. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through practitioners. D. H. Rice University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Freeman is one of the leading political philosophers of his generation.His influential papers include some of the most sophisticated and illuminatingdiscussions of themes from Rawls's earlier and later work. This importantcollection will be essential reading for anyone with a serious interest inpolitical philosophy." --R. Jay Wallace, University of California atBerkeley
"Freeman is one of the leading political philosophers of his generation. His influential papers include some of the most sophisticated and illuminating discussions of themes from Rawls's earlier and later work. This important collection will be essential reading for anyone with a seriousinterest in political philosophy." --R. Jay Wallace, University of California at Berkeley
"Freeman is the leading authority on the thought and writing of John Rawls, and Rawls was the leading political and social philosopher of the twentieth century. Freeman's clear, careful, and deeply informed studies in these essays offer important insight about basic questions of interpretationand justification--about Rawls's contractualism, about his relation to utilitarianism, about the idea of public reason, and about his reasons for limiting his principles of distributive justice to the self-contained nation-state."--Thomas Nagel, New York University
"Highly recommended."--D.H. Rice, CHOICE "Freeman seems to have read almost all of the classical philosophical sources on which Rawls drew, to have assimilated large stretches of contemporary and secondary literature, and to have thought deeply about every sentence Rawls ever wrote.... The result is an extraordinarily substantial set of papers...this is a very valuable book."-- Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews "Freeman is the leading authority on the thought and writing of John Rawls, and Rawls was the leading political and social philosopher of the twentieth century. Freeman's clear, careful, and deeply informed studies in these essays offer important insight about basic questions of interpretation and justification--about Rawls's contractualism, about his relation to utilitarianism, about the idea of public reason, and about his reasons for limiting his principles of distributive justice to the self-contained nation-state."--Thomas Nagel, New York University "Freeman is one of the leading political philosophers of his generation. His influential papers include some of the most sophisticated and illuminating discussions of themes from Rawls's earlier and later work. This important collection will be essential reading for anyone with a serious interest in political philosophy." --R. Jay Wallace, University of California at Berkeley
"Highly recommended."--D.H. Rice,CHOICE "Freeman seems to have read almost all of the classical philosophical sources on which Rawls drew, to have assimilated large stretches of contemporary and secondary literature, and to have thought deeply about every sentence Rawls ever wrote.... The result is an extraordinarily substantial set of papers...this is a very valuable book."--Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews "Freeman is the leading authority on the thought and writing of John Rawls, and Rawls was the leading political and social philosopher of the twentieth century. Freeman's clear, careful, and deeply informed studies in these essays offer important insight about basic questions of interpretation and justification--about Rawls's contractualism, about his relation to utilitarianism, about the idea of public reason, and about his reasons for limiting his principles of distributive justice to the self-contained nation-state."--Thomas Nagel, New York University "Freeman is one of the leading political philosophers of his generation. His influential papers include some of the most sophisticated and illuminating discussions of themes from Rawls's earlier and later work. This important collection will be essential reading for anyone with a serious interest in political philosophy." --R. Jay Wallace, University of California at Berkeley
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text collects articles on the influential philosopher John Rawls. It places Rawls within historical context in the social contract tradition, and addresses criticisms of this position. It is useful to a range of scholars interested in Rawls and the expanse of his influence.
Main Description
John Rawls (1921-2002) was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers and continues to be among the most widely discussed of contemporary thinkers. His work, particularly A Theory of Justice, is integral to discussions of social and international justice, democracy, liberalism,welfare economics, and constitutional law, in departments of philosophy, politics, economics, law, public policy, and others. Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, two of which are previously unpublished. Freeman places Rawls within historical context in the social contract tradition, addresses criticisms of his positions, anddiscusses the implications of his views on issues of distributive justice, liberalism and democracy, international justice, and other subjects. This collection will be useful to the wide range of scholars interested in Rawls and theories of justice.
Main Description
John Rawls (1921-2002) was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers and continues to be among the most widely discussed of contemporary thinkers. His work, particularlyA Theory of Justice,is integral to discussions of social and international justice, democracy, liberalism, welfare economics, and constitutional law, in departments of philosophy, politics, economics, law, public policy, and others. Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, two of which are previously unpublished. Freeman places Rawls within historical context in the social contract tradition, addresses criticisms of his positions, and discusses the implications of his views on issues of distributive justice, liberalism and democracy, international justice, and other subjects. This collection will be useful to the wide range of scholars interested in Rawls and theories of justice.
Main Description
Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, two of which are previously unpublished.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
A Theory of Justice
Reason and Agreement in Social Contract Viewsp. 17
Utilitarianism, Deontology, and the Priority of Rightp. 45
Consequentialism, Publicity, Stability, and Property-Owning Democracyp. 75
Rawls and Luck Egalitarianismp. 111
Congruence and the Good of Justicep. 143
Political Liberalism
Political Liberalism and the Possibility of a Just Democratic Constitutionp. 175
Public Reason and Political Justificationp. 215
The Law of Peoples
The Law of Peoples, Social Cooperation, Human Rights, and Distributive Justicep. 259
Distributive Justice and the Law of Peoplesp. 297
Remarks on John Rawls (Memorial Service, Sanders Theater, Harvard University, February 27, 2003)p. 323
John Rawls: Friend and Teacher (Chronicle Review: The Chronicle of Higher Education, December 13, 2002)p. 325
Indexp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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