Catalogue


Plagiarism and literary property in the Romantic period /
Tilar J. Mazzeo.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.
description
xiv, 236 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0812239679 (acid-free paper), 9780812239676
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.
isbn
0812239679 (acid-free paper)
9780812239676
catalogue key
6055652
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [189]-226) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-06-01:
During the long history of plagiarism, unacknowledged borrowings, even when extensive, were not automatically regarded as plagiarism. Attitudes changed radically in the late 18th century when imagination, genius, and above all originality became the most revered qualities in any work of art. Plagiarism came to reflect aesthetic failure and deplorable theft. Contrary to long-entrenched opinion, Mazzeo (Colby College) asserts that "during the Romantic period, plagiarism was primarily concerned neither with textual parallels nor with moral failure." Yet more surprisingly, she writes that "British writers understood plagiarism according to criteria that were distinct from twenty-first century constructions of the charge." Publishing another writer's work as one's own, she claims, was not regarded as plagiarism if improved on, and Coleridge's extensive appropriations are today mistakenly judged by standards unknown in his lifetime. Each of these statements is contestable and in this reviewer's judgment, false. Nevertheless, this is not a negligible work. The author has read prodigiously and provides a vast amount of material bearing on laws governing literary property, much of it obscure. She discusses in detail plagiarism charges against Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Clare that have often been dismissed or ignored. The bibliography is extensive and the analytical index excellent. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and researchers. N. Fruman emeritus, University of Minnesota
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Mazzeo's new book is . . . smart and insightful, and points out that eighteenth-century writers took a certain amount of borrowing for granted. What mattered was whether you were sneaky about it and, even more important, whether you improved upon what you took, by weaving it seamlessly into your own text and adding some new context or insight."- New York Times
"The author has read prodigiously and provides a vast amount of material bearing on laws governing literary property, much of it obscure. She discusses in detail plagiarism charges against Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Clare that have often been dismissed or ignored. The bibliography is extensive."--Choice
"The author has read prodigiously and provides a vast amount of material bearing on laws governing literary property, much of it obscure. She discusses in detail plagiarism charges against Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Clare that have often been dismissed or ignored. The bibliography is extensive."- Choice
"Mazzeo's new book is . . . smart and insightful, and points out that eighteenth-century writers took a certain amount of borrowing for granted. What mattered was whether you were sneaky about it and, even more important, whether you improved upon what you took, by weaving it seamlessly into your own text and adding some new context or insight."--New York Times
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
In a series of articles published in Tait's Magazinein 1834, Thomas DeQuincey catalogued four potential instances of plagiarism in the work of his friend and literary competitor Samuel Taylor Coleridge. DeQuincey's charges and the controversy they ignited have shaped readers' responses to the work of such writers as Coleridge, Lord Byron, William Wordsworth, and John Clare ever since. But what did plagiarism mean some two hundred years ago in Britain? What was at stake when early nineteenth-century authors levied such charges against each other? How would matters change if we were to evaluate these writers by the standards of their own national moment? And what does our moral investment in plagiarism tell us about ourselves and about our relationship to the Romantic myth of authorship? In Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period, Tilar Mazzeo historicizes the discussion of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century plagiarism and demonstrates that it had little in common with our current understanding of the term. The book offers a major reassessment of the role of borrowing, textual appropriation, and narrative mastery in British Romantic literature and provides a new picture of the period and its central aesthetic contests. Above all, Mazzeo challenges the almost exclusive modern association of Romanticism with originality and takes a fresh look at some of the most familiar writings of the period and the controversies surrounding them.
Main Description
In a series of articles published inTait's Magazinein 1834, Thomas DeQuincey catalogued four potential instances of plagiarism in the work of his friend and literary competitor Samuel Taylor Coleridge. DeQuincey's charges and the controversy they ignited have shaped readers' responses to the work of such writers as Coleridge, Lord Byron, William Wordsworth, and John Clare ever since. But what did plagiarism mean some two hundred years ago in Britain? What was at stake when early nineteenth-century authors levied such charges against each other? How would matters change if we were to evaluate these writers by the standards of their own national moment? And what does our moral investment in plagiarism tell us about ourselves and about our relationship to the Romantic myth of authorship? InPlagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period, Tilar Mazzeo historicizes the discussion of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century plagiarism and demonstrates that it had little in common with our current understanding of the term. The book offers a major reassessment of the role of borrowing, textual appropriation, and narrative mastery in British Romantic literature and provides a new picture of the period and its central aesthetic contests. Above all, Mazzeo challenges the almost exclusive modern association of Romanticism with originality and takes a fresh look at some of the most familiar writings of the period and the controversies surrounding them.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this book, Tilar Mazzeo historicises the discussion of the late 18th and early 19th century plagiarism and demonstrates that it had little in common with our understanding of the term.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Romantic Plagiarism and the Critical Inheritancep. 1
Coleridge, Plagiarism, and Narrative Masteryp. 17
Property and the Margins of Literary Print Culturep. 49
"The Slip-Shod Muse": Byron, Originality, and Aesthetic Plagiarismp. 86
Monstrosities Strung into an Epic: Travel Writing and the Defense of "Modern" Poetryp. 122
Poaching on the Literary Estate: Class, Improvement, and Enclosurep. 144
Afterwordp. 182
Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 227
Acknowledgmentsp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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