Catalogue


Designing with blends : conceptual foundations of human-computer interaction and software engineering /
Manuel Imaz, David Benyon.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : MIT Press, 2007.
description
xi, 229 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0262090422 (alk. paper), 9780262090421 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
added author
imprint
Cambridge, MA : MIT Press, 2007.
isbn
0262090422 (alk. paper)
9780262090421 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6054134
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"For too many years, software engineers and computer scientists have deliberately designed human beings out of the systems they developed. In Designing with Blends,Benyon and Imaz bring to these fields the sensibility of cognitive scientists: a concern for how ordinary people think, not simply how systems work. In the process, they show that conceptual blending is an even more powerful tool for good software design than metaphors were. As we move into the age of embodied computing, designing with blends will become what all software programmers do, whether they are aware of it or not." -Tim Rohrer, Director, Colorado Advanced Research Institute
"An excellent and detailed demonstration of the ways in which cognitive science provides new tools for software design."--Mark Turner, Institute Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science, Case Western Reserve University
"For too many years, software engineers and computer scientists have deliberately designed human beings out of the systems they developed. In *Designing with Blends*, Benyon and Imaz bring to these fields the sensibility of cognitive scientists: a concern for how ordinary people think, not simply how systems work. In the process, they show that conceptual blending is an even more powerful tool for good software design than metaphors were. As we move into the age of embodied computing, designing with blends will become what all software programmers do, whether they are aware of it or not."--Tim Rohrer, Director, Colorado Advanced Research Institute
"For too many years, software engineers and computer scientists have deliberately designed human beings out of the systems they developed. In Designing with Blends, Benyon and Imaz bring to these fields the sensibility of cognitive scientists: a concern for how ordinary people think, not simply how systems work. In the process, they show that conceptual blending is an even more powerful tool for good software design than metaphors were. As we move into the age of embodied computing, designing with blends will become what all software programmers do, whether they are aware of it or not." - Tim Rohrer , Director, Colorado Advanced Research Institute
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Summaries
Main Description
The evolution of the concept of mind in cognitive science over the past 25 years creates new ways to think about the interaction of people and computers. New ideas about embodiment, metaphor as a fundamental cognitive process, and conceptual integration-a blending of older concepts that gives rise to new, emergent properties-have become increasingly important in software engineering (SE) and human-computer interaction (HCI). If once computing was based on algorithms, mathematical theories, and formal notations, now the use of stories, metaphors, and blends can contribute to well-informed, sensitive software design. In Designing with Blends, Manuel Imaz and David Benyon show how these new metaphors and concepts of mind allow us to discover new aspects of HCI-SE. After 60 years, digital technology has come of age, but software design has not kept pace with technological sophistication; people struggle to understand and use their computers, cameras, phones, and other devices. Imaz and Benyon argue that the dominance of digital media in our lives demands changes in HCI-SE based on advances in cognitive science. The idea of embodied cognition, they contend, can change the way we approach design by emphasizing the figurative nature of interaction. Imaz and Benyon offer both theoretical grounding and practical examples that illustrate the advantages of applying cognitive concepts to software design. A new view of cognition, they argue, will develop a cognitive literacy in software and interaction design that helps designers understand the opportunities of digital technology and provides people with a more satisfying interactive experience.
Main Description
The evolution of the concept of mind in cognitive science over the past 25 years creates new ways to think about the interaction of people and computers. New ideas about embodiment, metaphor as a fundamental cognitive process, and conceptual integration--a blending of older concepts that gives rise to new, emergent properties--have become increasingly important in software engineering (SE) and human-computer interaction (HCI). If once computing was based on algorithms, mathematical theories, and formal notations, now the use of stories, metaphors, and blends can contribute to well-informed, sensitive software design. In Designing with Blends, Manuel Imaz and David Benyon show how these new metaphors and concepts of mind allow us to discover new aspects of HCI-SE.After 60 years, digital technology has come of age, but software design has not kept pace with technological sophistication; people struggle to understand and use their computers, cameras, phones, and other devices. Imaz and Benyon argue that the dominance of digital media in our lives demands changes in HCI-SE based on advances in cognitive science. The idea of embodied cognition, they contend, can change the way we approach design by emphasizing the figurative nature of interaction. Imaz and Benyon offer both theoretical grounding and practical examples that illustrate the advantages of applying cognitive concepts to software design. A new view of cognition, they argue, will develop a cognitive literacy in software and interaction design that helps designers understand the opportunities of digital technology and provides people with a more satisfying interactive experience.
Bowker Data Service Summary
If once computing was based on algorithms, formal notations, and mathematical theories, now the use of stories, metaphors, and blends can contribute to well-informed, sensitive software design. In 'Designing with Blends', the authors show how these metaphors and concepts of mind allow us to discover new aspects of HCI-SE.
Main Description
The evolution of the concept of mind in cognitive science over the past 25 years creates new ways to think about the interaction of people and computers. New ideas about embodiment, metaphor as a fundamental cognitive process, and conceptual integration--a blending of older concepts that gives rise to new, emergent properties--have become increasingly important in software engineering (SE) and human-computer interaction (HCI). If once computing was based on algorithms, mathematical theories, and formal notations, now the use of stories, metaphors, and blends can contribute to well-informed, sensitive software design. In Designing with Blends, Manuel Imaz and David Benyon show how these new metaphors and concepts of mind allow us to discover new aspects of HCI-SE. After 60 years, digital technology has come of age, but software design has not kept pace with technological sophistication; people struggle to understand and use their computers, cameras, phones, and other devices. Imaz and Benyon argue that the dominance of digital media in our lives demands changes in HCI-SE based on advances in cognitive science. The idea of embodied cognition, they contend, can change the way we approach design by emphasizing the figurative nature of interaction. Imaz and Benyon offer both theoretical grounding and practical examples that illustrate the advantages of applying cognitive concepts to software design. A new view of cognition, they argue, will develop a cognitive literacy in software and interaction design that helps designers understand the opportunities of digital technology and provides people with a more satisfying interactive experience.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Growing Up in the Digital Agep. 1
Things Digitalp. 2
The Felt Sense of Thinkingp. 5
A Short History of Cognitionp. 7
Concepts of Softwarep. 10
Human-Computer Interactionp. 13
Framing the Problemp. 15
Cognition and the Bodyp. 19
Cognitive Modelsp. 21
Concepts and Categoriesp. 26
Image Schematap. 30
Embodied Cognitionp. 35
Metaphors and Blendsp. 37
Metaphorp. 37
Mental Spacesp. 40
Blendsp. 43
Metaphor or Blend?p. 48
The Desktop Metaphorp. 50
Metaphors and Figurative Languagep. 54
Blends in Human-Computer Interaction and Software Engineeringp. 57
Types of Integration Networksp. 57
Figurative Language in SEp. 61
Figurative Language in HCIp. 66
SE Examples of Blendsp. 70
Software Engineeringp. 77
Concepts and Notationsp. 77
Entity-Relationship Modelsp. 82
State-Transition Diagramsp. 85
The Top-Down Methodp. 86
Data-Flow Diagramsp. 88
The OO Paradigmp. 90
A Basic Ontology for SEp. 98
Human-Computer Interactionp. 103
Principles of Blendsp. 106
Actions in HCIp. 114
Tasks in HCIp. 120
Goals and Personaep. 123
Future Interactionsp. 130
Understanding Requirementsp. 135
Perspectives on Requirementsp. 135
Requirements in SEp. 144
Scenariosp. 152
Use Casesp. 162
Patternsp. 167
Designing with Blendsp. 171
Metaphor and Designp. 171
Analysisp. 173
Designp. 179
Designing a Home Information Centerp. 183
Conclusionsp. 191
Reflectionsp. 193
Emerging Views on HCIp. 194
Personal Spacesp. 198
Fluency in Conceptual Integrationp. 201
Critical Perspectivesp. 204
Summaryp. 206
Referencesp. 209
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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