Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The great American crime decline /
Franklin E. Zimring.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
description
xiv, 258 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195181158 (alk. paper), 9780195181159
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
isbn
0195181158 (alk. paper)
9780195181159
catalogue key
6052723
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-10-01:
The dramatic decline in conventional crime during the 1990s has been widely celebrated, and had not been widely anticipated. Prominent criminologist Zimring (law, Berkeley) explores in depth the specific nature of the decline and the credibility of the various factors and policies to which it has been attributed. The first two chapters identify the parameters of the crime decline and the environment in which it occurred. The two chapters in part 2 examine the various causes and explanations for this decline. The third part looks at the special cases of Canada and New York City. The fourth and final part includes two chapters on likely future directions, and lessons from the experience of the 1990s. To his credit, Zimring disavows simplistic, one-dimensional answers. A complex of factors was involved in the crime decline, and available data cannot fully explain it. A basic limitation of this study is that the author adopts the conventional conception of crime, and says nothing whatsoever about white collar crime. This book, which includes several appendixes, compares most closely with Alfred Blumstein and Joel Wallman, eds., The Crime Drop in America (2000). Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. D. O. Friedrichs University of Scranton
Reviews
Review Quotes
"'Success has many fathers,' and the Great Crime Decline of the 1990s is no exception. Who or what should actually get the credit? Frank Zimring provides an engaging guide to the data and the principal claimants for paternity. There are no simple answers here, but the reader will be rewardedwith fresh and important lessons about crime, crime control, and the criminological enterprise, delivered with his usual wit and verve."--Philip J. Cook, Duke University
"The crime drop of the 1990s was an important phenomenon that has led many scholars to search for the factors that contributed to it. Frank Zimring, one of the most prolific and important scholars of crime and criminal justice, addresses others' perspectives, some critically and some withvaluable elaboration, and adds a number of his own. The result is a very readable volume that answers some questions and raises many more for future research."--Alfred Blumstein, Carnegie Mellon University
"The Great American Crime Decline poses a vigorous and thoughtful challenge to existing theories and research on American crime trends. Zimring's engaging prose and provocative arguments should interest scholars, policymakers, and anyone interested in the causes and consequences of thenation's longest crime drop on record. A masterful contribution."--Richard Rosenfeld, University of Missouri-St. Louis
"To his credit, Zimring disavows simplistic, one-dimensional answers....Recommended."--CHOICE
"When you examine a complicated matter such as the crime reduction in the U.S., seeking the causes for such reductions, be prepared for statistics. But it is worth it, particularly when one finds that New York City's drop in crime in all seven index crime rates are 'roughly double the nationalaverage.' Reading this book will greatly enhance your understanding of this crucial issue and put you on the path to becoming an expert."--Edward I. Koch, 105th Mayor of New York City
"When you examine a complicated matter such as the crime reduction in the U.S., seeking the causes for such reductions, be prepared for statistics. But it is worth it, particularly when one finds that New York City's drop in crime in all seven index crime rates are 'roughly double the national average.' Reading this book will greatly enhance your understanding of this crucial issue and put you on the path to becoming an expert."--Edward I. Koch, 105th Mayor of New York City "'Success has many fathers,' and the Great Crime Decline of the 1990s is no exception. Who or what should actually get the credit? Frank Zimring provides an engaging guide to the data and the principal claimants for paternity. There are no simple answers here, but the reader will be rewarded with fresh and important lessons about crime, crime control, and the criminological enterprise, delivered with his usual wit and verve."--Philip J. Cook, Duke University "The crime drop of the 1990s was an important phenomenon that has led many scholars to search for the factors that contributed to it. Frank Zimring, one of the most prolific and important scholars of crime and criminal justice, addresses others' perspectives, some critically and some with valuable elaboration, and adds a number of his own. The result is a very readable volume that answers some questions and raises many more for future research."--Alfred Blumstein, Carnegie Mellon University "The Great American Crime Decline poses a vigorous and thoughtful challenge to existing theories and research on American crime trends. Zimring's engaging prose and provocative arguments should interest scholars, policymakers, and anyone interested in the causes and consequences of the nation's longest crime drop on record. A masterful contribution."--Richard Rosenfeld, University of Missouri-St. Louis "To his credit, Zimring disavows simplistic, one-dimensional answers....Recommended."--CHOICE
"When you examine a complicated matter such as the crime reduction in the U.S., seeking the causes for such reductions, be prepared for statistics. But it is worth it, particularly when one finds that New York City's drop in crime in all seven index crime rates are 'roughly double the national average.' Reading this book will greatly enhance your understanding of this crucial issue and put you on the path to becoming an expert."--Edward I. Koch, 105th Mayor of New York City "Zimring writes with a style and language that makes this book accessible to readers both inside and outside of academia. His comprehensive review and explanation of crime statistics will be understandable to more casual readers while his critical review of the various reasons offered to explain the crime decline is done in the careful, thorough, well-researched, and thought-provoking way that is expected in Zimring's work...this book is a rich compilation of numbers, analysis, and insight that is organized to give the reader a deeper understanding of American crime rates and the complex interplay of factors that might explain its decline in the 1990s."-- Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare "'Success has many fathers,' and the Great Crime Decline of the 1990s is no exception. Who or what should actually get the credit? Frank Zimring provides an engaging guide to the data and the principal claimants for paternity. There are no simple answers here, but the reader will be rewarded with fresh and important lessons about crime, crime control, and the criminological enterprise, delivered with his usual wit and verve."--Philip J. Cook, Duke University "I learned a tremendous amount from Frank Zimring's highly readable and penetrating examination of the US drop in crime in the 1990s. Zimring is unsurpassed in his mastery of the relevant crime literature and the wildly varying pronouncements that have emerged from it over the last 40 years."-- Punishment and Society "The crime drop of the 1990s was an important phenomenon that has led many scholars to search for the factors that contributed to it. Frank Zimring, one of the most prolific and important scholars of crime and criminal justice, addresses others' perspectives, some critically and some with valuable elaboration, and adds a number of his own. The result is a very readable volume that answers some questions and raises many more for future research."--Alfred Blumstein, Carnegie Mellon University " The Great American Crime Decline poses a vigorous and thoughtful challenge to existing theories and research on American crime trends. Zimring's engaging prose and provocative arguments should interest scholars, policymakers, and anyone interested in the causes and consequences of the nation's longest crime drop on record. A masterful contribution."--Richard Rosenfeld, University of Missouri-St. Louis "To his credit, Zimring disavows simplistic, one-dimensional answers....Recommended."-- CHOICE "[Zimring] produced a masterpiece of scientific work, making sense of the data when possible and showing his readers when it is not possible to conclude anything. This is exactly what a scientific approach should yield...Zimring covers his topics comprehensively...His book demonstrates how research should be done to bring about understanding about changes in the crime rate."-- -Net: Business Network
"When you examine a complicated matter such as the crime reduction in the U.S., seeking the causes for such reductions, be prepared for statistics. But it is worth it, particularly when one finds that New York City's drop in crime in all seven index crime rates are 'roughly double the national average.' Reading this book will greatly enhance your understanding of this crucial issue and put you on the path to becoming an expert."--Edward I. Koch, 105th Mayor of New York City "Zimring writes with a style and language that makes this book accessible to readers both inside and outside of academia. His comprehensive review and explanation of crime statistics will be understandable to more casual readers while his critical review of the various reasons offered to explain the crime decline is done in the careful, thorough, well-researched, and thought-provoking way that is expected in Zimring's work...this book is a rich compilation of numbers, analysis, and insight that is organized to give the reader a deeper understanding of American crime rates and the complex interplay of factors that might explain its decline in the 1990s."--Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare "'Success has many fathers,' and the Great Crime Decline of the 1990s is no exception. Who or what should actually get the credit? Frank Zimring provides an engaging guide to the data and the principal claimants for paternity. There are no simple answers here, but the reader will be rewarded with fresh and important lessons about crime, crime control, and the criminological enterprise, delivered with his usual wit and verve."--Philip J. Cook, Duke University "I learned a tremendous amount from Frank Zimring's highly readable and penetrating examination of the US drop in crime in the 1990s. Zimring is unsurpassed in his mastery of the relevant crime literature and the wildly varying pronouncements that have emerged from it over the last 40 years."--Punishment and Society "The crime drop of the 1990s was an important phenomenon that has led many scholars to search for the factors that contributed to it. Frank Zimring, one of the most prolific and important scholars of crime and criminal justice, addresses others' perspectives, some critically and some with valuable elaboration, and adds a number of his own. The result is a very readable volume that answers some questions and raises many more for future research."--Alfred Blumstein, Carnegie Mellon University "The Great American Crime Declineposes a vigorous and thoughtful challenge to existing theories and research on American crime trends. Zimring's engaging prose and provocative arguments should interest scholars, policymakers, and anyone interested in the causes and consequences of the nation's longest crime drop on record. A masterful contribution."--Richard Rosenfeld, University of Missouri-St. Louis "To his credit, Zimring disavows simplistic, one-dimensional answers....Recommended."--CHOICE "[Zimring] produced a masterpiece of scientific work, making sense of the data when possible and showing his readers when it is not possible to conclude anything. This is exactly what a scientific approach should yield...Zimring covers his topics comprehensively...His book demonstrates how research should be done to bring about understanding about changes in the crime rate."---Net: Business Network
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Many theories--from the routine to the bizarre--have been offered up to explain the crime decline of the 1990s. Was it record levels of imprisonment? An abatement of the crack cocaine epidemic? More police using better tactics? Or even the effects of legalized abortion? And what can we expectfrom crime rates in the future? Franklin E. Zimring here takes on the experts, and counters with the first in-depth portrait of the decline and its true significance. The major lesson from the 1990s is that relatively superficial changes in the character of urban life can be associated with up to75% drops in the crime rate. Crime can drop even if there is no major change in the population, the economy or the schools. Offering the most reliable data available, Zimring documents the decline as the longest and largest since World War II. It ranged across both violent and non-violent offenses, all regions, and every demographic. All Americans, whether they live in cities or suburbs, whether rich or poor, are safertoday. Casting a critical and unerring eye on current explanations, this book demonstrates that both long-standing theories of crime prevention and recently generated theories fall far short of explaining the 1990s drop. A careful study of Canadian crime trends reveals that imprisonment and economicfactors may not have played the role in the U.S. crime drop that many have suggested. There was no magic bullet but instead a combination of factors working in concert rather than a single cause that produced the decline. Further--and happily for future progress, it is clear that declines in the crime rate do not require fundamental social or structural changes. Smaller shifts inpolicy can make large differences. The significant reductions in crime rates, especially in New York, where crime dropped twice the national average, suggests that there is room for other cities to repeat this astounding success. In this definitive look at the great American crime decline, Franklin E. Zimring finds no pat answersbut evidence that even lower crime rates might be in store.
Table of Contents
What Happened in the 1990s?
The Size and Character of the Crime Declinep. 3
The Environment for Optimism: Crime Trends and Attitudes about the Effectiveness of Crime Policiesp. 25
The Search for Causes
The Usual Suspects: Imprisonment, Demography, and the Economyp. 45
Progeny of the 1990s: Three New Explanations of Declinep. 73
Two New Perspectives
Which Twin Has the Toni? Some Statistical Lessons from Canadap. 107
New York City's Natural Experimentp. 135
Twenty-First Century Lessons
What Happens Next?p. 171
Seven Lessons from the 1990sp. 195
Crime and Abortion Policy in Europe, Canada, and Australiap. 211
Supplementary Statistics on Crime Trends in Canada during the 1990sp. 223
Trends for the City of New York and the United States during the 1990sp. 229
Measuring the Extent of Decline in Selected High-Decline Citiesp. 237
Referencesp. 243
Indexp. 250
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem